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Journal Articles

HARRIS, P., Griffin, D. W., & Murray, S. (2008). Testing the Limits of Optimistic Bias: Event and Person Moderators in a Multi-Level Framework. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 95, 1225-1237. N. D. Weinstein (1980) established that optimistic bias, the tendency to see others as more vulnerable to risks than the self, varies across types of event. Subsequently, researchers have documented that this phenomenon, also known as comparative optimism, also varies across types of people. The authors integrate hypotheses originally advanced by Weinstein concerning event-characteristic moderators with later arguments that such optimism may be restricted to certain subgroups. Using multilevel modeling over 7 samples (N = 1,436), the authors found that some degree of comparative optimism was present for virtually all individuals and events. Holding other variables constant, higher perceived frequency and severity were associated with less comparative optimism, higher perceived controllability and stereotype salience with more comparative optimism. Frequency, controllability, and severity were associated more with self-risk than with average-other risk, whereas stereotype salience was associated more with average-other risk than with self-risk. Individual differences also mattered: comparative optimism was related negatively to anxiety and positively to defensiveness and self-esteem. Interaction results imply that both individual differences and event characteristics should jointly be considered in understanding optimistic bias (or comparative optimism) and its application to risk communication. Further details

HARRIS, P., & Stobart, J. (1986). Sex role stereotyping in British television advertisements at different times of the day: An extension and refinement of Manstead and McCulloch (1981). British Journal of Social Psychology, 25, 155-164.

ARMITAGE, C. J. (2008). A volitional help sheet to encourage smoking cessation: A randomized exploratory trial. Health Psychology, 27, 557-566. Objective: The volitional help sheet draws on Gollwitzer's (1993) concept of implementation intentions by encouraging smokers to link temptations to smoke with appropriate behavioral responses derived from Prochaska and DiClemente's (1983) transtheoretical model. Design: One hundred and ninety three smokers were randomly allocated to receive questionnaires, planning instruction and a volitional help sheet or one of three control conditions: Questionnaire-only; questionnaire plus planning instruction; or questionnaire, planning instruction plus volitional help sheet without the explicit instruction to link temptations to smoke with appropriate behavioral responses. Main Outcome Measures: Nicotine dependence, number of cigarettes smoked and quit status. Results: Findings revealed significant decreases in nicotine dependence, number of cigarettes smoked and increases in quitting in the volitional help sheet condition, relative to the control conditions, Fs(3, 189) = 7.48 to 10.78, ps < .01, …p2s = .11 to .15. This pattern of findings did not hold for social cognitive variables, with few differences between the volitional help sheet (standard instructions) group and the other conditions. Conclusion: The findings provide support for the use of implementation intentions to protect against health risk behaviors and are congruent with laboratory research showing that implementation intentions are a case of strategic automaticity. Further details

McNally, C., BEAIL, N., & Kellett, S. (2008). The experience of detention under the Mental Health Act (1983). advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities., 1(4), 47-53. This study explored the experiences of detention under the Mental Health Act (1983) of people with learning disabilities. Seven semi-structured one-to-one interviews were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Participants had mild learning disabilities and had been detained under the Mental Health Act in England for compulsory assessment and treatment within a two-year period prior to the study. A number of valuable insights emerged, including: the impact of perceived lack of control over self, experiences of vulnerability/powerlessness/victimisation (both prior to and following detention), participant's sense of care versus punishment; the development of 'role' within the mental health system and attribution of blame. Further details

McNally, C., BEAIL, N., & KELLETT, S. (2007). The experience of detention under the Mental Health Act (1983). advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities., 1, 48-53.

HARRIS, P. (1984). Shyness and Psychological Imperialism; On the dangers of ignoring the ordinary language roots of the terms we deal with. European Journal Of Social Psychology, 14, 169-181.

HARRIS, P. (1984). The hidden face of shyness: A message from the shy for researchers and practitioners. Human Relations, 37, 1079-1094.

MAY, J. (1984). The songflight of the Lapwing on Lundy. Lundy Field Society Annual Report, 35, 19-24.

HARRIS, P. (1985). Asch's data and the 'Asch Effect': A critical note. British Journal of Social Psychology, 24, 229-230.

Overton, P. G., Dean, P., & REDGRAVE, P. (1985). Detection of stimuli in the far periphery by rats; possible role of superior colliculus. Exp. Brain Res., 59, 559-569.

Cooper, C., Kline, P., & MAY, J. (1986). "The measurement of authoritarianism, psychoticism and other traits by objective tests: a cross validation." Personality and Individual Differences, 7, 15-21.

Kline, P., MAY, J., & Cooper, C. (1986). Correlations among elementary cognitive tasks. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 56, 111-118.

MAY, J., Cooper, C., & Kline, P. (1986). The reliability of reaction times in some elementary cognitive tasks. Personality and Individual Differences, 7, 893-895.

Daniels, D., MAY, J., & Lewis, R. (1987). Vocalisations of the Oystercatcher. Devon Birds.

MAY, J., & Kline, P. (1987). "Extraversion, Neuroticism, Obsessionality and the Type A Behaviour Pattern." British Journal of Medical, 60, 253-259. Further details

MAY, J., & Kline, P. (1987). Measuring the effects upon cognitive abilities of sleep loss during continuous operations. British Journal of Psychology, 78, 443-455. Further details

MAY, J., & Kline, P. (1987). Factors influencing failure on stressful army training courses. Personality and Individual Differences, 8, 947-949.

MAY, J., Kline, P., & Cooper, C. (1987). "A brief, computerised form of a schematic analogy task." British Journal of Psychology, 78, 29-39. Further details

HARRIS, P., & Wilshire, P. (1988). Estimating the prevalence of shyness in the 'Global Village': Pluralistic ignorance or false consensus? Journal of Personality, 56, 405-415.

MAY, J., & Kline, P. (1988). An objective measure of fatigue derived from a set of brief tasks. Work and Stress, 2, 59-70.

MAY, J., & Kline, P. (1988). Problems in using an adjective checklist to measure fatigue. Personality and Individual Differences, 9, 831-832.

Overton, P. G., & DEAN, P. (1988). Detection of visual stimuli after lesions of the superior colliculus in the rat; deficit not confined to the far periphery. . Behav. Brain Res., 31, 1-15.

STONE, J. V. (1988). "Connectionist Models: Theoretical Status, Form and Function." Artificial Intelligence and Simulation of Behaviour, 15-18.

Byerley, P., MAY, J., Brooks, P., Keil, K., Whitefield, A., & Denley, I. (1990). Enabling States: A new approach to usability. Proceedings of the 13th International Symposium on Human Factors in Telecommunications, 285-294.

GURNEY, K., & Wright, M. J. (1990). A neural model of velocity encoding. Perception, 19, (3)401-402.

Mathews, A., Mogg, K., MAY, J., & Eysenck, M. (1990). Implicit and explicit memory bias in anxiety. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 98, 236-240.

MAY, J., Bšcker, M., Barnard, P. J., & Green, A. J. K. (1990). Characterising structural and dynamic aspects of the interpretation of visual interface objects. Esprit '90 Conference proceedings, 819-834. Further details

NICOLSON, R. I., & FAWCETT, A. J. (1990). Automaticity: A new framework for dyslexia research? Cognition, 35, "(2), 159-182." Further details

Wright, M. J., & GURNEY, K. (1990). Speed discrimination and motion detection in 2-dimensional patterns. Perception, 19, 341-342.

ARMITAGE, C. J. (2009). Is there utility in the transtheoretical model? British Journal of Health Psychology, 14, 195-210. OBJECTIVES: The transtheoretical model is arguably the dominant model of health behaviour change, having received unprecedented research attention, yet it has simultaneously attracted exceptional criticism. However, the criticisms have been directed almost exclusively at the stages of change, just one of fourteen components of the transtheoretical model, which may have diverted attention away from more fruitful avenues of research based on the model. DESIGN AND METHODS: Narrative review. RESULTS: The evidence would suggest some flaws in the concept of stages of change as currently articulated in the transtheoretical model. On a conceptual level, even studies incorporating the five stages of change point to a model that better fits Gollwitzer (1993) and Heckhausen's (1991) idea of a motivational phase followed by a volitional phase. Potentially the processes of change components of the transtheoretical model may actually prove the most useful, yet have been under-researched, at least experimentally. Three studies that successfully utilise the processes of change to reduce alcohol consumption, encourage smoking cessation and increase physical activity are described. CONCLUSIONS: Elements of the transtheoretical model offer promise in developing effective health behaviour change interventions, but the question arises as to whether extracting these elements undermines completely the idea of a transtheoretical model. Further details

CARROLL, D. J., Apperly, I. A., & Riggs, K. J. (2007). Choosing between two objects reduces 3-year-olds' errors on a reverse-contingency test of executive function. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology. In the present experiment, we used a reversed-contingency paradigm (the windows task: [Russell, J., Mauthner, N., Sharpe, S., & Tidswell, T. (1991). The windows task as a measure of strategic deception in preschoolers and autistic subjects. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 9, 331-349]) to explore the effect of alterations in the task array on 3-year-old children's strategic reasoning. Children were offered a choice between either a desirable object and an undesirable object, or between a desirable object and an empty location. There was significantly better performance on the two-object version of the task. This difference was evident even on subsequent trials when the second object was removed and the empty location reintroduced. This suggests that presenting children with a choice between two objects helps them to formulate a strategy, rather than to execute a previously determined response. Further details

CARROLL, D. J., Apperly, I. A., & Riggs, K. J. (2007). The executive demands of strategic reasoning are modified by the way in which children are prompted to think about the task: Evidence from 3- to 4-year-olds. Cognitive Development, 22(1), 142-148. We investigated a test of strategic reasoning (the Windows task) that in different studies has yielded contrasting pictures of young children's executive abilities [Russell, J., Mauthner, N., Sharpe, S., & Tidswell, T. (1991). The “windows task” as a measure of strategic deception in preschoolers and autistic subjects. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 9, 331–349; Samuels, M. C., Brooks, P. J., & Frye, D. (1996). Strategic game playing through the windows task. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 14, 159–172]. An experiment with 52 three- to four-year-olds showed robust effects of different wordings for the prompts used to ask children to respond, and found that a single exposure to the facilitating wording led to improved performance on subsequent trials where the standard wording was used. This suggests that the effect of the wording was to help children infer an appropriate basis for responding, and not to reduce the trial-by-trial working memory or inhibitory demands of the task. Further details

KNOWLES, R., Tai, S., Christensen, I., & Bentall, R. P. (2005). Coping with depression and vulnerability to mania: A factor analytic study of Nolen-Hoeksema's (1991) Response Styles Questionnaire. British Journal Of Clinical Psychology, 44, 99-112. Objectives. To assess the factor structure of the Nolen-Hoeksema (I99I) Response Styles Questionnaire (RSQ), and to investigate the relationship between coping with depression and other measures of affective symptomatology in a student sample. Design. A factor analytic study of the RSQ followed by an investigation of the relationship between RSQ scale scores and measures of affective symptomatology. Method. Five hundred twenty-eight undergraduate students completed a battery of questionnaires comprising the RSQ, Beck Depression Inventory, Hypomania Personality Questionnaire, Positive and Negative Affect Scale and the Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale. Factor analysis of the RSQ was performed and correlational and regression analyses were conducted on the data from the other four questionnaire measures. Results. Factor analysis revealed a meaningful 3-factor solution which measured coping styles characterized by (i) rumination; (ii) pleasant distraction and problem-solving; and (iii) risk-taking. Rumination and risk-taking were independently associated with both depression and hypomania scores, and hypomania was associated with both depression and dysfunctional attitudes. Additional relationships between coping and the other measures are also reported. Conclusions. The results support the validity of the coping styles concept and suggest their natural separation into three distinct strategies. Abnormal coping is discussed as a potential contributing factor to affective symptoms, including symptoms of bipolar disorder. Further details

Byerley, P., MAY, J., Whitefield, A., & Denley, I. (1991). Enabling States: designing usable telecommunications systems. IEEE Journal of Selected Areas in Communication, 9, "(4), 524-530".

Caycho, L., Gunn, P., & SIEGAL, M. (1991). Counting in children with Down Syndrome. American Journal on Mental Retardation, 95, 575-583.

DEAN, P., MAYHEW, J. E. W., Thacker, N., & Langdon, P. (1991). Saccade Control In a Simulated Robot Camera-Head System - Neural Net Architectures For Efficient Learning Of Inverse Kinematics. Biological Cybernetics, 66, 1: 27-36. Further details

Eysenck, M., Mogg, K., MAY, J., Richards, A., & Mathews, A. (1991). Bias in interpretation of ambiguous sentences related to threat in anxiety. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 100, 144-150.

FAWCETT, A. J., & NICOLSON, R. I. (1991). Vocabulary Training forDyslexic Children. Journal Of Learning Disabilities, 24, 379-383. Further details

Mathews, A., MAY, J., Mogg, K., & Eysenck, M. (1991). Attentional bias in anxiety: selective search or defective filtering? Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 99, 166-173.

Mogg, K., Mathews, A., Eysenck, M., & MAY, J. (1991). "Biased cognitive operations in anxiety: artefact, processing priorities, or attentional search?" Behaviour Research and Therapy, 29, 459-467.

Mogg, K., Mathews, A., MAY, J., Grove, M., Eysenck, M., & Weinman, J. (1991). Assessment of cognitive bias in anxiety and depression using a colour perception task. Cognition and Emotion, 5, 221-238.

NORMAN, P., Fitter, M., & WALL, T. (1991). General-Practitioners Subjective Experience Of Surgery Workload. Social Science and Medicine, 33, 2: 161-166.

Overton, P. G., & Clark, D. (1991). N-methyl-D-aspartate increases the excitability of nigrostriatal dopamine terminals. Eur. J. Pharmacol., 201, 117-120.

SIEGAL, M., & Beattie, K. (1991). Where to look first for children's knowledge of false beliefs. Cognition, 38, 1-12.

Wright, M. J., & GURNEY, K. (1991). Solving the aperture problem for stereoscopic motion in depth. Perception, 20, 120-120.

Devalle, M. N., & NORMAN, P. (1992). "Causal Attributions, Health Locus Of Control Beliefs and Life-Style Changes Among Preoperative Coronary Patients." Psychology and Health, 7, 3: 201-211. Further details

FAWCETT, A. J., & NICOLSON, R. I. (1992). Automatisation Deficits in Balance for Dyslexic Children. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 75, 507-529. Further details

GURNEY, K. (1992). Training nets of hardware realizable sigma-pi units. Neural Networks, 5, (2)289-303. Further details

GURNEY, K. (1992). Training Recurrent Nets of Hardware realisable Sigma-Pi Units. International Journal of Neural Systems, 3, 31-42.

GURNEY, K. (1992). Weighted Nodes and RAM-Nets: A Unified Approach. Journal of Intelligent Systems, 2, 155-186.

GURNEY, K., & Wright, M. J. (1992). A self-organizing neural network model of image velocity encoding. Biological Cybernetics, 68, (2)173-181. Further details

GURNEY, K., & Wright, M. J. (1992). Digital Nets and intelligent systems. Journal of Intelligent Systems, 2, 1-10.

GURNEY, K., & Wright, M. J. (1992). Coherence and transparency in nonrigid plaid motion. Perception, 20, (1)84-84.

Kashima, Y., SIEGAL, M., Tanaka, K., & Kashima, E. S. (1992). Do people believe that attitudes are consistent with behavior? Towards a cultural psychology of attribution processes. British Journal of Social Psychology, 31, 111-124.

Marrow, L., Overton, P. G., & Clark, D. (1992). Amelioration of some neuroleptic-induced deficits by the NMDA antagonist MK-801 in a conditioned reaction time task. Behav. Pharmacol., 3, 57-64.

NICOLSON, R. I., & FAWCETT, A. J. (1992). Spelling Remediation For Dyslexic-Children Using the Selfspell Programs. Lecture Notes In Computer Science, 602, 503-515. Further details

Overton, P. G., & Clark, D. (1992). Electrophysiological evidence that intrastriatally administered N-methyl-D-aspartate augments striatal dopamine tone in the rat. J. Neural Transm. [P.D. Sect.], 4, 1-14.

OVErton, P. G., & Clark, D. (1992). Iontophoretically administered drugs acting at the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor modulate burst firing in A9 dopamine neurons in the rat. Synapse, 10, 131-140.

Overton, P. G., Elliott, P. J., Hagan, R. M., & Clark, D. (1992). Neurokinin agonists differentially affect A9 and A10 dopamine cells in the rat. Eur. J. Pharmacol., 213, 165-166.

REDGRAVE, P., Simkins, M., Overton, P., & DEAN, P. (1992). Anticonvulsant role of nigrotectal projection in the maximal electroshock model of epilepsy - l. Mapping of the dorsal midbrain with bicuculline. . Neuroscience, 46, 379-390.

STONE, J. V. (1992). The Adaptive Bisector Method: Separating Slant and Tilt in Obtaining Shape from Texture. "British Machine Vision Conference, Leeds 1992", 177-186. Further details

STONE, J. V. (1992). The Optimal Elastic Net: Finding Solutions to the Travelling Salesman Problem. "International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks, Brighton 1992." 170-174. Further details

STONE, J. V. (1992). Shape From Local and Global Analysis of Texture. Transactions Royal Society London, 339, 1287: 1253-1265. Further details

Wright, M. J., & GURNEY, K. (1992). Dependence of stereomotion on the orientation of spatial-frequency components. Ophthalmic and Physiological Optics, 12, 264-268. Further details

Wright, M. J., & GURNEY, K. (1992). "Coherence, transparency and the discrimination of rigid and nonrigid motion." Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, 33, 1050-1050.

Wright, M. J., & GURNEY, K. (1992). Lower threshold of motion for one-dimensional and 2-dimensional patterns in central and peripheral-vision. Vision Research, 32, 121-134. Further details

ANDRADE, J., & Meudell, P. R. (1993). Is spatial information encoded automatically in memory? Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 46A, "(2), 365-375." Further details

Baddeley, A., Papagno, C., & ANDRADE, J. (1993). The sandwich effect: The role of attentional factors in serial recall. "Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition". Further details

Barnard, P. J., & MAY, J. (1993). Cognitive Modelling for User Requirements. "Computers, Communication and Usability: Design issues, research and methods for integrated services", 101-146. Further details

BUCKLEY, D., & FRISBY, J. P. (1993). "Interaction of stereo, texture and outline cues in the shape perception of three-dimensional ridges." Vision Research, 33, 919-933. Further details

FAWCETT, A. J., Chattopadhyay, A. K., Kandler, R. H., Jarratt, J. A., NICOLSON, R. I., & Proctor, M. (1993). Event-related potentials and dyslexia. Annals Of the New York Academy Of Sciences, 682, 342-345. Further details

GURNEY, K. (1993). Training Nets Of Stochastic Units Using System-Identification. Neural Networks, 6, (1)133-145. Further details

Marrow, L., Overton, P. G., & Clark, D. (1993). Disruption of conditioned reaction time performance by dopamine receptor antagonists in the rat. Behav. Pharmacol., 4, 15-28.

MAY, J., & Barnard, P. J. (1993). Using Structural Descriptions of Interfaces to Automate the Modelling of User Cognition. Modelling and User Adaptive Interfaces, 3, 27-64. Further details

MAY, J., Tweedie, L., & Barnard, P. J. (1993). Modelling User Performance in Visually Based Interactions. People and Computers VIII, 95-110. Further details

Mšhlmann, D., Nachreiner, F., NICKEL, P., & Schlechter, H. (1993). Does the controller in freight forwarding require traffic radio? [in German]. Der Spediteur, 41, 189-196.

Munglani, R., ANDRADE, J., Sapsford, D. J., Baddeley, A. D., & Jones, J. G. (1993). A measure of consciousness and memory during isoflurane administration: The coherent frequency. British Journal of Anaesthesia, 71, "(5), 633-641." Further details

NICOLSON, R. I., & FAWCETT, A. J. (1993). Towards the origins of dyslexia. Dyslexia and its remediation, 371-392. Further details

NICOLSON, R. I., & FAWCETT, A. J. (1993). Children With Dyslexia Classify Pure-Tones Slowly. Annals Of the New York Academy Of Sciences, 682, 387-389. Further details

NORMAN, P. (1993). Predicting the Uptake Of Health Checks In General-Practice - Invitation Methods and Patients Health Beliefs. Social Science and Medicine, 37, 1: 53-59. Further details

NORMAN, P., & Conner, M. (1993). Role Of Social Cognition Models In Predicting Attendance At Health Checks. Psychology and Health, 8, 6: 447-462. Further details

STONE, J. V. (1993). Computer Vision: What Is The Object? "Prospects for AI, Proc. Artificial Intelligence and Simulation of Behaviour, Birmingham 1993 ", 199-208. Further details

ANDRADE, J. (1994). Is learning during anaesthesia implicit?: Commentary on Shanks & St. John. Behavioural and Brain Sciences, 17(3), 395-396.

ANDRADE, J., & Munglani, R. (1994). Therapeutic suggestions during general anaesthesia (letter to the editor). British Journal of Anaesthesia, 72.

ANDRADE, J., Munglani, R., Jones, J. G., & Baddeley, A. D. (1994). Cognitive performance during anaesthesia. Consciousness and Cognition, 3, "(2), 148-165". Further details

Baddeley, A., & ANDRADE, J. (1994). "Reversing the word-length effect: A comment on Caplan, Rochon and Waters." Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology. Further details

Baddeley, A., & MAY, J. (1994). Fifty years of the MRC Applied Psychology Unit. The Psychologist, 7, "(11), 513-514".

Bolouri, H., Morgan, P., & GURNEY, K. (1994). "Design, Manufacture and Evaluation Of a Scalable High-Performance Neural System." Electronics Letters, 30, (5) pp 426-427. Further details

BUCKLEY, D., FRISBY, J. P., & Freeman, J. (1994). Lightness perception can be affected by surface curvature from stereopsis. Perception, 23, 869-881. Further details

FAWCETT, A. J., & NICOLSON, R. I. (1994). Persistent Deficits In Motor Skill Of Children With Dyslexia. Journal Of Motor Behavior, 27, 3: 235-240. Further details

FAWCETT, A. J., & NICOLSON, R. I. (1994). Naming Speed In Children With Dyslexia. Journal Of Learning Disabilities, 27, 10: 641-646. Further details

G.W.Z., B., FAWCETT, A. J., & NICOLSON, R. I. (1994). Adults With Dyslexia Have a Deficit In Voice Recognition. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 78, 1: 304-306. Further details

HARRIS, P. R., & Middleton, W. (1994). Unrealistic optimism about health and the illusion of control: On being less at risk but no more in control than others. British Journal of Social Psychology, 33, 369-386.

MAY, J., & Barnard, P. J. (1994). Supportive Evaluation of Interface Design. Proceedings of the First Workshop on Cognitive Modelling and Interface Design, Vienna, 14-17 Dec.

MAYHEW, J. E. W., & Langdon, P. (1994). Learning and Maintaining Saccadic Accuracy - a Model Of Brain-Stem- Cerebellar Interactions. Journal Of Cognitive Neuroscience, 6, 2: 117-138. Further details

Middleton, W., HARRIS, P. R., & Hollely, C. (1994). Condom use in heterosexual students: Justifications for unprotected intercourse. Health Education Journal, 53, 147-154.

NICOLSON, R. I., & FAWCETT, A. J. (1994). Reaction-Times and Dyslexia. Quarterly Journal Of Experimental Psychology Section a-Human Experimental Psychology, 47, 1: 29-48. Further details

NICOLSON, R. I., & FAWCETT, A. J. (1994). Comparison Of Deficits In Cognitive and Motor-Skills Among Children With Dyslexia. Annals Of Dyslexia, 44, 147-164. Further details

Occhipinti, S., & SIEGAL, M. (1994). Reasoning about food and contamination. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 66, 243-253.

STONE, J. V. (1994). Learning Spatio-temporal Invariances. "Proceedings of British Machine Vision Conference, York 1994", 681-690.

STONE, J. V. (1994). Evolutionary Robots: Our Hands In Their Brains? "Proceedings of the Artificial Life Conference, Boston 1994", 400-405. Further details

STONE, J. V., & Lister, R. (1994). On the Relative Time Complexities of Standard and Conjugate Gradient Back-Propagation. "Proc. IEEE Int. Conf. Neural Networks, Orlando 1994", 84-87. Further details

Wiseman, R., HARRIS, P., & Middleton, W. (1994). Luckiness and psi: An initial study. Journal of the Society for Psychical Research, 60, 1-15.

ANDRADE, J. (1995). Learning during anaesthesia: A review. British Journal of Psychology, 86, "(4), 479-506." Further details

Barnard, P. J., & MAY, J. (1995). Interactions with Advanced Graphical Interfaces and the Deployment of Latent Human Knowledge. "Eurographics Workshop on the Design, Specification and Verification of Interactive Systems", 15-48. Further details

Brachacki, G. W. Z., NICOLSON, R. I., & FAWCETT, A. J. (1995). Impaired Recognition Of Traffic Signs In Adults With Dyslexia. Journal Of Learning Disabilities, 28, 297-301. Further details

DEAN, P. (1995). Modelling the Role Of the Cerebellar Fastigial Nuclei In Producing Accurate Saccades - the Importance Of Burst Timing. Neuroscience, 68, 4: 1059-1077. Further details

FAWCETT, A. J., & NICOLSON, R. I. (1995). Persistence of phonological awareness deficits in older children with dyslexia. Reading and Writing, 7, 361-376. Further details

FRISBY, J. P., BUCKLEY, D., & Horsman, J. M. (1995). "Integration of stereo, texture, and outline cues during pinhole viewing of real ridge-shaped objects and stereograms of ridges." Perception, 24, 181-198. Further details

FRISBY, J. P., BUCKLEY, D., Wishart, K. A., PORRILL, J., GŒrding, J., & MAYHEW, J. E. W. (1995). Interaction of stereo and texture cues in the perception of three-dimensional steps. Vision Research, 35, 1463-1472. Further details

Grogan, S., Conner, M., Willits, D., & NORMAN, P. (1995). Development Of a Questionnaire to Measure Patients Satisfaction With General-Practitioners Services. British Journal Of General Practice, 45, 399: 525-529. Further details

GURNEY, K. (1995). Untitled. Neural Networks, 8, (3)489-489.

HOCKEY, G. R. J., & Maule, A. J. (1995). Unscheduled manual interventions in automated process control. Ergonomics, 38, 2504-2524.

Lister, R., & STONE, J. V. (1995). "Error Functions, Error Signals, and Conjugate Gradient Back Propagation." "International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks, Cambridge ", 76-81.

Lister, R., & STONE, J. V. (1995). Error Functions and Conjugate Gradient Back Propagation. "Australian Conference on Neural Networks, Sydney", 130-133.

MAY, J., & Barnard, P. J. (1995). Four easy pieces for assessing the usability of multimodal interaction: the CARE properties. Human-Computer Interaction: Interact '95, 115-120. Further details

MAY, J., & Barnard, P. J. (1995). Towards supportive evaluation during design. Interacting with Computers, 7, 115-143. Further details

MAY, J., & Barnard, P. J. (1995). Cinematography and Interface Design. Human-Computer Interaction: Interact'95, 26-31. Further details

MAY, J., Scott, S., & Barnard, P. (1995). Structuring Displays: a psychological guide. Eurographics Tutorial Notes Series, PS95 TN4.

NICOLSON, R. I., & FAWCETT, A. J. (1995). Dyslexia is more than a phonological disability. Dyslexia: An International Journal of Research and Practice, 1, 19-37. Further details

NICOLSON, R. I., FAWCETT, A. J., & DEAN, P. (1995). Time-Estimation Deficits In Developmental Dyslexia - Evidence Of Cerebellar Involvement. Proceedings Of the Royal Society Of London Series B-Biological Sciences, 259, 1354: 1343-1347. Further details

NORMAN, P. (1995). Applying the Health Belief Model to the Prediction Of Attendance At Health Checks In General-Practice. British Journal Of Clinical Psychology, 34, 3: 461-470. Further details

NORMAN, P. (1995). Health Locus Of Control and Health Behavior - an Investigation Into the Role Of Health Value and Behavior-Specific Efficacy Beliefs. Personality and Individual Differences, 18, 2: 213-218. Further details

NORMAN, P., & Bonnett, C. (1995). Managers Intentions to Be Assessed For National Vocational Qualifications - an Application Of the Theory Of Planned Behavior. Social Behavior and Personality, 23, 1: 59-67. Further details

NORMAN, P., Collins, S., Conner, M., Martin, R., & Rance, J. (1995). "Attributions, Cognitions, and Coping Styles - Teleworkers Reactions to Work-Related Problems." Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 25, 2: 117-128. Further details

NORMAN, P., & Smith, L. (1995). "The Theory Of Planned Behavior and Exercise - an Investigation Into the Role Of Prior Behavior, Behavioral Intentions and Attitude Variability." European Journal Of Social Psychology, 25, 4: 403-415. Further details

Overton, P. G., & Greenfield, S. A. (1995). Determinants of neuronal firing pattern in the guinea-pig subthalamic nucleus: An in vivo and in vitro comparison. J. Neural Transm. [P.D. Sect.], 10, 41-54.

Overton, P. G., O'Callaghan, J. F. X., & Greenfield, S. A. (1995). Possible intermixing of neurons from the subthalamic nucleus and substantia nigra pars compacta in the guinea-pig. . Exp. Brain Res., 107, 151-165.

Peterson, C. C., & SIEGAL, M. (1995). "Deafness, conversation, and theory of mind." Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 36, 459-474.

Russo, R., & ANDRADE, J. (1995). The directed forgetting effect in word fragment completion: An application of the process dissociation procedure. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 48A, "(2), 405-423". Further details

SIEGAL, M. (1995). Becoming mindful of food and conversation. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 6, 177-181.

STONE, J. V. (1995). Hierarchical Learning of Spatio-Temporal Invariances. "International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks, Cambridge 1995", 110-115.

STONE, J. V. (1995). The Sinking Is Green Stone: Using Spatio-Temporal Cues in Vision. Image Processing, 7, 4: 20-25. Further details

STONE, J. V., & Bray, A. (1995). A Learning Rule for Extracting Spatio-Temporal Invariances. Network, 6, 3: 1-8. Further details

STONE, J. V., & Isard, S. (1995). Adaptive Scale Filtering: A General Method for Obtaining Shape From Texture. IEEE Trans. Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, 17, 7: 713-718. Further details

STONE, J. V., & Thornton, C. (1995). Can Artificial Neural Networks Learn Useful Regularities? "International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks, Cambridge 1995", 201-205.

Tattesall, A. J., & HOCKEY, G. R. J. (1995). Level of operator control and changes in heart rate variability during simulated flight maintenance. Human Factors, 37, 682-698.

Tong, Z. Y., Overton, P. G., & Clark, D. (1995). Chronic administration of (+)-amphetamine alters the reactivity of midbrain dopaminergic neurons to prefrontal cortex stimulation in the rat. Brain Res., 674, 63-74.

Wright, M. J., & GURNEY, K. (1995). From spatiotemporal tuning to velocity analysis. In Basic and Clinical Perspectives on Vision Research Kluwer.

Wright, M. J., & GURNEY, K. (1995). Discrimination of rotation sense in gratings and plaids. Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, 36, S 635-S 635.

Wright, M. J., & GURNEY, K. (1995). The discrimination of dynamic orientation changes in gratings. Perception, 24, 665-679. Further details

Adams, W., FRISBY, J. P., BUCKLEY, D., Hippesley-Cox, S. D., J., G., & PORRILL, J. (1996). Pooling vertical disparity information in the human visual system. Perception, 25, 165-176. Further details

ANDRADE, J. (1996). "Investigations of hypesthesia: Using anesthetics to explore relationships between consciousness, learning and memory." Consciousness and Cognition, 5, 562-580. Further details

ANDRADE, J., Sapsford, D., Jeevaratnum, D., Pickworth, A., & Jones, J. (1996). The coherent frequency in the electroencephalogram as an objective measure of cognitive function during propofol sedation. Anesthesia and Analgesia, 83, 6: 1279-1284. Further details

Barnard, P. J., MAY, J., & Salber, D. (1996). Deixis and points of view in media spaces: an empirical gesture. Behaviour and Information Technology, 15, 37-50. Further details

BEAIL, N., & Warden, S. (1996). Sexual Abuse of Adults with Learning Disabilities. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 39, "(5), 382-387".

Bellotti, V., Blandford, A., Duke, D., MacLean, A., MAY, J., & Nigay, L. (1996). Controlling Accessibility In Computer Mediated Communications: A Systematic Analysis Of The Design Space. Human Computer Interaction, 11, 357-432. Further details

BLADES, M., & SPENCER, C. P. (1996). The development of children's ability to use spatial representations. Advances in Child Development and Behavior, 25, 157-199.

Buckingham Shum, S. B., Blandford, A., Duke, D., Good, J., MAY, J., Paterno, F., et al. (1996). Multidisciplinary Modelling for User-Centred System Design: An Air Traffic Control Case Study. People and Computers XI, 201-219. Further details

BUCKLEY, D., FRISBY, J. P., & Blake, A. (1996). Does the human visual system implement an ideal observer theory of slant from texture? Vision Research, 36, 1163-1176. Further details

Conner, M., & NORMAN, P. (1996). Body weight and shape control: examining component behaviours. Appetite, 27, 135-150. Further details

DEAN, P. (1996). Motor unit recruitment in a distributed model of extraocular muscle. Journal of Neurophysiology, 76, 727-742. Further details

DEAN, P. (1996). Saccades and the adjustable pattern generator. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 19, 441-442. Further details

FAWCETT, A. J., NICOLSON, R. I., & DEAN, P. (1996). Impaired performance of children with dyslexia on a range of cerebellar tasks. Annals Of Dyslexia, 46, 259-283. Further details

FRISBY, J. P., BUCKLEY, D., & Duke, P. A. (1996). Evidence for good recovery of lengths of real objects seen with natural stereo viewing. Perception, 25, 129-154. Further details

FRISBY, J. P., BUCKLEY, D., & Freeman, J. (1996). Stereo and texture cue integration in the perception of planar and curved large real surfaces. Attention and Performance, XVI, 77-92.

GURNEY, K., & Wright, M. J. (1996). A biologically plausible model of early visual motion processing II: Psychophysical application. Biological Cybernetics, 74, 349-358.

GURNEY, K., & Wright, M. J. (1996). A model for the spatial integration and differentiation of velocity signals. Vision Research, 36, 2939-2955.

GURNEY, K., & Wright, M. J. (1996). Rotation and radial motion thresholds support a 2-stage model of differential motion analysis. Perception, 25, 5-26.

GURNEY, K., & Wright, M. J. (1996). A biologically plausible model of early visual motion processing I: Theory and implementation. Biological Cybernetics, 74, 339-348.

HARRIS, P. (1996). Sufficient grounds for optimism? The relationship between perceived controllability and optimistic bias. Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, 15, 9-52.

Harvey, I., & STONE, J. V. (1996). Unicycling Helps Your French: Spontaneous Recovery of Associations by Learning Unrelated Tasks. Neural Computation, 8, 697- 704. Further details

HOCKEY, G. R. J., Payne, R. L., & Rick, J. T. (1996). Intra-individual patterns of hormonal and affective adaptation to work demands: An n=2 study of junior doctors. Biological Psychology, 42, 393-411.

KENT, G. (1996). Shared understandings for informed consent: The relevance of psychological research on the provision of information. Social Science and Medicine, 43, 10: 1517-1523. Further details

King, S. M., Shehab, S., DEAN, P., & REDGRAVE, P. (1996). Differential expression of fos-like immunoreactivity in the descending projections of superior colliculus after electrical stimulation in the rat. Behavioural Brain Research, 78, 131-145. Further details

Leung, P., & CONNOLLY, K. J. (1996). Distractibility in hyperactive and conduct-disordered children. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 37, 305-212. Further details

Ling, J., & BLADES, M. (1996). Incidental recall of color information by children and adults. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 10, 141-150. Further details

March, P., & HARRIS, P. (1996). Beliefs about stories: Parents' and therapists' explanations of childhood difficulties. Contemporary Family Therapy, 18, 291-304.

MARTLEW, M., & CONNOLLY, K., J. (1996). Human figure drawings by schooled and unschooled children in Papua New Guinea. Child Development, 67, 2743-2762. Further details

Maule, A. J., & HOCKEY, G. R. J. (1996). The effects of mood on risk taking behaviour. The Psychologist, 9, 464-467.

MAY, J., & Barnard, P. (1996). A modest experiment in the humanely useful use of electronic archives. Behaviour and Information Technology, 15, 193-201. Further details

MAYHEW, J. E. W., Askew, S., ZHENG, Y., PORRILL, J., Westby, G. W. M., REDGRAVE, P., et al. (1996). Cerebral vasomotion: 0.1 Hz oscillation in reflectance imaging of neural activity. NeuroImage, 4, "No. 3, 183-193."

Middleton, W., HARRIS, P., & Surman, M. (1996). Give 'em enough rope: Perception of health and safety risks in bungee jumpers. Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, 15, 68-79.

Newcombe, P. A., & SIEGAL, M. (1996). Where to look first for suggestibility in children's memory. Cognition, 59, 337-356.

NORMAN, P., & Conner, M. (1996). Predicting health check attendance among prior attenders and non-attenders: the role of prior behaviour in the theory of planned behaviour. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 26, 1010-1026. Further details

NORMAN, P., & Parker, S. (1996). The interpretation of change in verbal reports: implications for health psychology. Psychology and Health, 11, 301-314. Further details

Occhipinti, S., & SIEGAL, M. (1996). Cultural evolution and divergent rationalities in human reasoning. Ethos: Journal of Psychological Anthropology, 24, 510-526.

Overton, P. G., Tong, Z. Y., & Clark, D. (1996). A pharmacological analysis of the burst events induced in midbrain dopaminergic neurons by electrical stimulation of the prefrontal cortex in the rat. J. Neural Transm. [Gen. Sect.], 103, 523-540.

OVERTON, P. G., Tong, Z. Y., & Clark, D. (1996). Preferential occupation of mineralocorticoid receptors by corticosterone enhances glutamate-induced burst firing in rat midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Brain Res., 737, 146-154.

PRESCOTT, T. J. (1996). Spatial representation for navigation in animats. Adaptive Behaviour, 4, (2): 85-123.

Richards, A., French, C., & HARRIS, P. (1996). Does clock-watching make you clock wise? Memory, 4, 49-58.

SHEERAN, P., & Orbell, S. (1996). How confidently can we infer health beliefs from questionnaire responses? Psychology and Health, 11, 2: 273-290. Further details

SHEERAN, P., Spears, R., Abraham, C., & Abrams, D. (1996). "Religiosity, gender and the double standard." Journal of Psychology, 130, 23-33. Further details

Shehab, S., Simkins, S., DEAN, P., & REDGRAVE, P. (1996). Regional distribution of the anticonvulsant and behavioural effects of muscimol injected into the substantia nigra of rats. European Journal of Neuroscience, 8, 749-757. Further details

SIEGAL, M., Carrington, J., & Radel, M. (1996). Theory of mind and pragmatic understanding following right hemisphere damage. Brain and Language, 53, 40-50.

SIEGAL, M., & Peterson, C. C. (1996). Breaking the mold: A fresh look at questions about children's understanding of lies and mistakes. Developmental Psychology, 32, 322-334.

Smith, M. D., Wiseman, R., HARRIS, P., & Joiner, R. (1996). On being lucky: The psychology and parapsychology of luck. European Journal of Parapsychology, 12, 35-43.

Sowden, S., Stea, D., BLADES, M., SPENCER, C., & Blaut, J. (1996). "Mapping abilities of four-year-old children in York, England." Journal of Geography, 95, 107-111. Further details

STONE, J. V. (1996). Learning Perceptually Salient Visual Parameters Using Spatiotemporal Smoothness Constraints. Neural Computation, 8, 7: 1463-1492. Further details

STONE, J. V. (1996). Learning Stereo Disparity Using Temporal Smoothness Constraints: A Computational Model. Spatial Vision: Special Issue on Learning and Adaptation in Man and Machine, 10, 1: 15-29. Further details

STONE, J. V. (1996). A Canonical Microfunction For Learning Perceptual Invariances. Perception, 25, 207-220. Further details

Tong, Z. Y., Overton, P. G., & Clark, D. (1996). Stimulation of the prefrontal cortex in the rat induces patterns of activity in midbrain dopaminergic neurons which resemble natural burst events. Synapse, 22, 195-208.

Tong, Z. Y., Overton, P. G., & Clark, D. (1996). Antagonism of NMDA receptors but not AMPA/kainate receptors blocks bursting in dopaminergic neurons induced by electrical stimulation of the prefrontal cortex. J. Neural Transm., 103, 889-904.

TURPIN, G., & Cuthbert, B. (1996). Clinical psychology and behavioural medicine. Current Opinion in Psychiatry, 9, 6: 413-416.

Ungar, S., BLADES, M., & SPENCER, C. (1996). The ability of visually impaired children to locate themselves on a tactile map. Journal Of Visual Impairment and Blindness, 90, 6: 526-535. Further details

WALL, T. D. (1996). Working with robots. The Psychologist, 9, 163-166.

WALL, T. D. (1996). Modern Manufacturing and work organisation: The value of a wider perspective. Applied Psychology: An International Review, 45, 123-126.

WALL, T. D., & Chmiel, M. (1996). Basic and applied considerations in research on advanced manufacturing technology. International Journal of Psychology, 31, 4632.

WALL, T. D., Jackson, P. R., & Parker, S. K. (1996). The demands-control model of job strain: A more specific test. Journal of Occupational and Organisational Psychology, 69, 153-166. Further details

Westerman, S. J., Hambley, S., Alder, C., Wyatt-Millington, C. W., Shrayne, N. M., Crawshaw, C. M., et al. (1996). Investigating the human-computer interface using the datalogger. "Behavior Research Methods, Instruments & Computers", 28, 603-606.

Wright, M. J., & GURNEY, K. (1996). Thresholds for detecting change in shape. Applied Vision Association Newsletter, 117, 33-34.

ZHENG, Y., Billings, S. A., MAYHEW, J. E. W., & FRISBY, J. P. (1996). Motion parameter recovery and 3D scene segmentation using vehicle trajectory constraints. Electronics Letters, 32, "No. 10, 884-885."

Orbell, S., & SHEERAN, P. (1998). Can social cognition models contribute to the effectiveness of HIV-preventive health promotion? A review of the literature and a reply to Joffe (1996:1997) & Fife-Schaw (1997). British Journal of Medical Psychology, 71, 297-310.

Abraham, C., SHEERAN, P., & Johnston, M. (1997). From health beliefs to self-regulation: theoretical advances in the psychology of action control. Psychology and Health, 0, 1-23.

ANDRADE, J., Kavanagh, D., & Baddeley, A. (1997). Eye-movements and visual imagery: A working memory approach to the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder. British Journal Of Clinical Psychology, 36, 2: 209-223.

Bennett, P., NORMAN, P., Moore, L., Murphy, S., & Tudor Smith, C. (1997). Health locus of control and value for health in smokers and nonsmokers. Health Psychology, 16, 2: 179-182.

BERWICK, J., Askew, S., Hou, Y., & ZHENG, Y. (1997). Optical imaging of V-signal oscillations in the microcirculation of the rat cerebral cortex and testes. Neurosciences Abstracts, 651, "No. 12, 1577."

BIRDI, K., Allan, C., & WARR, P. (1997). Correlates and perceived outcomes of four types of employee development activity. Journal of Applied Psychology, 82(6), 845-857. Further details

Bolden, R. I., Waterson, P., WARR, P. B., WARR, P. B., & WALL, T. D. (1997). A new taxonomy of modern manufacturing practices. International Journal of Operations and Production Management, 17, 11: 1112-1130.

Brumfitt, S. M., & SHEERAN, P. (1997). An evaluation of short-term group therapy for people with aphasia. Disability and Rehabilitation, 19, 6: 221-230.

Carroll, P. H., Ogg, T. W., Watson, B., Hitchcock, M., Pickworth, T., ANDRADE, J., et al. (1997). "The safety, efficacy recovery characteristics of desflurane versus propofol for anaesthesia in an older day surgery population." Ambulatory Surgery, 52, 85-92.

DEAN, P. (1997). abducens internuclear neurons: synaptic specificity vs. intrinsic motoneuron properties. Journal of Neurophysiology, 78, 1531-1549. Further details

Duke, P. A., FRISBY, J. P., PORRILL, J., & BUCKLEY, D. (1997). Systematic perceptual distortion of the normal to a plane may be explained by errors in perceived viewing distance. Perception, 26.

Eglen, S., Bray, A., & STONE, J. V. (1997). Unsupervised discovery of invariances. Network: Computation in Neural Systems, Nov, 441-452. Further details

Flowers, P., SHEERAN, P., BEAIL, N., & Smith, J. A. (1997). The role of psychosocial factors in HIV risk-reduction among gay and bisexual men: A quantitative review. Psychology and Health, 12, 2: 197-230.

Flowers, P., Smith, J. A., SHEERAN, P., & BEAIL, N. (1997). Health and romance: Understanding unprotected sex in relationships between gay men. British Journal of Health Psychology, 2, 2: 73-78. Further details

FRISBY, J. P., Catherall, C., PORRILL, J., & BUCKLEY, D. (1997). Sequential stereopsis using high-pass spatial frequency filtered textures. Vision Research, 37, 22: 3109-3116. Further details

GURNEY, K. (1997). An Introduction to Neural Networks. UCL Press (Taylor & Francis group).

HOCKEY, G. R. J. (1997). Compensatory control in the regulation of human performance under stress and high workload: A cognitive energetical framework. Biological Psychology, 45, 73-93.

Jarman, M., Smith, J. A., & WALSH, S. (1997). The psychological battle for control: A qualitative study of health-care professionals' understandings of the treatment of anorexia nervosa. Journal Of Community and Applied Social Psychology, 7, 2: 137-152. Further details

KENT, G. (1997). "The views of members of local research ethics committees, researchers and members of the public towards the roles and functions of LRECs." Journal of Medical Ethics, 23, 3: 186-190. Further details

KENT, G., Rubin, G., Getz, T., & Humphris, G. (1997). Development of a scale to measure the social and psychological effects of severe dental anxiety: Social attributes of the Dental Anxiety Scale. Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, 24, 6: 394-397. Further details

Kitchin, R. M., BLADES, M., & Golledge, R. G. (1997). Relations between psychology and geography. Environment and Behavior, 29, 4: 554-573. Further details

Kitchin, R. M., BLADES, M., & Golledge, R. G. (1997). Understanding spatial concepts at the geographic scale without the use of vision. Progress In Human Geography, 21, 2: 225-242. Further details

Leung, P. W. L., & CONNOLLY, K. J. (1997). Test of two views of impulsivity in hyperactive and conduct-disordered children. Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, 39, 9: 574-582. Further details

MAY, J. (1997). "Review of Landauer, T. 'The Trouble with ComputersÕ". Journal of Environmental Psychology, 16, 285-286.

MAY, J. (1997). "Review of Parkinson, B. et al., 'Changing Moods'". Health Psychology Update, 28, 30-31.

MAY, J., & Barnard, P. J. (1997). Modelling Multimodal Interaction: A theory-based technique for design analysis and support. Human-Computer Interaction INTERACT '97, 667-668. Further details

Mullarkey, S., Jackson, P. R., WALL, T. D., Wilson, J. R., & Grey Taylor, S. M. (1997). The impact of technology characteristics and job control on worker mental health. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 18, 5: 471- 489. Further details

Newcombe, P. A., & SIEGAL, M. (1997). Explicitly questioning the nature of suggestibility in preschoolers' memory and retention. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 67, 185-203.

NICOLSON, P. (1997). Feminist social psychology: A Review. Feminism and Psychology, 7, 2: 248-254.

O'Rourke, M. M., Hammond, S. M., & DAVIES, J. (1997). Risk Assessment and Risk Management: The Way Forward. Psychiatric Care, 4(3), 104-106.

Overton, P. G., & Clark, D. (1997). Burst firing in midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Brain Res. Rev., 25, 312-334.

PAPADAKIS, N. G., Carpenter, T. A., & Hall, L. D. (1997). An algorithm for numericalcalculation of the k-space data-weighting for polarly sampledtrajectories: application to spiral imaging. Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 15, (7):785-794.

PAPADAKIS, N. G., Wilkinson, A. A., Carpenter, T. A., & Hall, L. D. (1997). A general method for measurement of the time integral of variant magnetic field gradients: application to 2D spiral imaging. Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 15, (5):567-578.

Parker, S. K., Chmiel, N., & WALL, T. D. (1997). Work characteristics and employee well-being within a context of downsizing. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 2, 289-303.

Parker, S. K., WALL, T. D., & Jackson, P. R. (1997). "('Translation' by S.R. Peck of paper by same authors: ""That's not my job"": Developing flexible employee work orientations. " Academy of Management Journal, 40, 899-929.

Parker, S. K., WALL, T. D., & Jackson, P. R. (1997). That's not my job: Developing flexible employee work orientations. Academy of Management Journal, 40, "4:, 899-929." Further details

Peace, K. A., Orme, S. M., Sebastian, J. P., THOMPSON, A. R., Barnes, S., Ellis, A., et al. (1997). The effect of treatment variables on mood and social adjustment in adult patients with pituitary disease. Clinical Endocrinology, 46, 445-450.

Peace, K. A., Orme, S. M., THOMPSON, A. R., Padayatty, S., Ellis, A. W., & Belchetz, P. E. (1997). Cognitive dysfunction in patients treated for pituitary tumours. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, 19, 1-6.

PRESCOTT, T., & Ibbotson, C. (1997). A robot trace-maker: modelling the fossil evidence of earlier invertebrate behavior. Artificial Life, 3, 289-306. Further details

Richards, A., French, C., & HARRIS, P. (1997). Mistakes around the clock: Errors in memory for the orientation of numerals. Journal of Psychology, 132, 42-46.

Robertson, I. H., Manly, T., ANDRADE, J., Baddeley, B. T., & Yiend, J. (1997). 'Oops!': Performance correlates of everyday attentional failures in traumatic brain injured and normal subjects. Neuropsychologia, 35, 6: 747-758. Further details

S., O., S., H., & SHEERAN, P. (1997). Implementation Intentions and the Theory of Planned Behavior. PSPB, 23, 945-954. Further details

Sauer, J., Wastell, D. G., & HOCKEY, G. R. J. (1997). Skill maintenance in extended spaceflight: A human factors analysis of space and analogue work environments. Acta Astronautica, 39, 579-587.

Savidge, C. J., & SLADE, P. (1997). Psychological aspects of chronic pelvic pain. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 42, 5: 433-444. Further details

Shehab, S., Guadagno, J., Ferguson, K., & REDGRAVE, P. (1997). Regional distribution of the anticonvulsant and behavioural effects of bicuculline injected into the pontine reticular formation of rats. European Journal of Neuroscience, 9, 9: 1875-1884. Further details

Smith, M. D., Wiseman, R., & HARRIS, P. R. (1997). Perceived luckiness and the UK National Lottery. "Proceedings of Presented Papers, The Parapsychological Association/Society for Psychical Research Joint Conference".

Smith, M. D., Wiseman, R., Machin, D., HARRIS, P., & Joiner, R. (1997). Luckiness, competition, and performance on a psi task. Journal of Parapsychology, 61, 33-43.

TURPIN, G. (1997). "Anxiety, attention and defense responses." Journal of Psychophysiology, 11.

Ungar, S., BLADES, M., & SPENCER, C. (1997). Teaching visually impaired children to make distance judgments from a tactile map. Journal Of Visual Impairment and Blindness, 91, 2: 163-174. Further details

Ungar, S., BLADES, M., & SPENCER, C. (1997). Strategies for knowledge acquisition from cartographic maps by blind and visually impaired adults. Cartographic Journal, 34, 2: 93-110. Further details

Ungar, S., BLADES, M., & SPENCER, C. (1997). The ability of visually impaired children to locate themselves on a tactile map. Journal Of Visual Impairment and Blindness, 90, 6: 526-535.

Wahass, S., & KENT, G. (1997). A comparison of public attitudes in Britain and Saudi Arabia towards auditory hallucinations. International Journal of Social Psychiatry, 43, 3: 175-183. Further details

Wahass, S., & KENT, G. (1997). A cross-cultural study of the attitudes of mental health professionals towards auditory hallucinations. International Journal of Social Psychiatry, 43, 3: 184-192. Further details

WALL, T. D., Bolden, R. I., Borrill, C. S., A.J., C., Golya, D. A., Hardy, G. E., et al. (1997). Minor psychiatric disorder in NHS Trust staff: Occupational and gender differences. British Journal of Psychiatry, 171, 519-523.

Wang, S., & REDGRAVE, P. (1997). Microinjections of muscimol into lateral superior colliculus disrupt orienting and oral movements in the formalin model of pain. Neuroscience, 81, 4: 967-988. Further details

Webb, R., SAHAL, A., & Morrison, J. D. (1997). The optical quality of the human eye revisited. Ophthalmics and Physiological Optics, 17, (6) 516 - 521.

Wishart, K. A., FRISBY, J. P., & BUCKLEY, D. (1997). The role of 3-D surface slope in a lightness/brightness effect. Vision Research, 37, 4: 467-473. Further details

Wright, M. J., & GURNEY, K. (1997). Coherence and motion transparency in rigid and non-rigid plaids. Perception, 26, 553-567.

Xing, D., PAPADAKIS N, G., Huang, C. L.-H., Lee, V. M., Carpenter, T. A., & Hall, L. D. (1997). Optimised diffusion-weighting for measurement of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in human brain. Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 15, (7): 771-784.

Abraham, C., SHEERAN, P., & Wight, D. (1998). Designing research-based materials to promote safer sex among young people. "Psychology, Health and Medicine", 3, 127-131.

Abraham, C., SHEERAN, P., & Wight, D. (1998). Can social cognitive models contribute to the effectiveness of HIV-preventive behavioural interventions? British Journal of Medical Psychology, 71, 297-310. Further details

ANDRADE, J., & Jones, J. G. (1998). Is amnesia for intraoperative events good enough? British Journal of Anaesthesia, 80, (5): 575-576.

ANDRADE, J., & Jones, J. G. (1998). Editorial: Is amnesia for intra-operative events good enough? British Journal of Anaesthesia.

Bennett, P., NORMAN, P., Murphy, S., Moore, L., & Tudor Smith, C. (1998). "Beliefs about alcohol, health locus of control, value for health and reported consumption in a representative population sample." Health Education Research, 13, (1): 25-32. Further details

Berry, E., NICOLSON, R. I., Foster, J. K., Behrmann, M., & Sagar, H. J. (1998). Slowing of reaction time in Parkinson's disease: the involvement of the frontal lobes. Neuropsychologia, 37, (7): 787-795.

Berry, E. L., Jenkins, I. H., NICOLSON, R. I., FAWCETT, A. J., DEAN, P., & D.J., B. (1998). Cerebellar function is impaired in dyslexia: a PET activation study. Neurology, 50, (4): 1005.

BLADES, M., Blaut, J., Darvizeh, Z., Elguea, S., Soni, D., Sowden, S., et al. (1998). A Cross-Cultural Study of Young Children's Mapping Abilities. Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, 23, (2): 269-277. Further details

Bourne, A., Oliver, K., & WARR, P. B. (1998). Agreement and disagreement in 360-degree feedback. Proceedings of the Test User Conference. Leicester : British Psychological Society, 21-26.

BUCKLEY, D., Brennand, D. A. A., Davis, H., Horsman, J. M., & FRISBY, J. P. (1998). Why are some people slow in seeing complex random dot stereograms? "ARVO Abstract, Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science", 39, S191.

BUCKLEY, D., STONE, J. V., Brennand, D. A. A., & Davis, H. (1998). Predicting individual differences in performance of an object recognition task (ECVP98 abstract). Perception, 27, 1124.

Clark, D., & Overton, P. G. (1998). Alterations in excitatory amino acid-mediated regulation of midbrain dopaminergic neurons induced by chronic psychostimulant administration and stress: Relevance to drug addiction. Addict. Biol., 3, 109-135.

Coca, D., ZHENG, Y., MAYHEW, J. E. W., & Billings, S. A. (1998). Non-linear analysis of vasomotion oscillations in reflected light measurements. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, 454, 571-582.

Conner, M., & ARMITAGE, C. J. (1998). Extending the theory of planned behavior: A review and avenues for further research. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 28, 1429-1464. Further details

Crowe, A., PORRILL, J., & PRESCOTT, T. J. (1998). Kinematic coordination of reach and balance. Journal Of Motor Behavior, 30, 217-233. Further details

DEAN, P., & PORRILL, J. (1998). Pseudo-inverse control in biological systems: A learning mechanism for fixation stability. Neural Networks, 11, 1205-1218. Further details

Duke, D. J., Barnard, P. J., MAY, J., & Duce, D. A. (1998). Syndetic modelling. Human Computer Interaction, 13, 337-393. Further details

Duke, P., FRISBY, J. P., BUCKLEY, D., & PORRILL, J. (1998). "Distance miscalibration under reduced-cue viewing conditions can explain metric errors in judging surface normals, ECVP-98." Perception, 27, 111.

Edelmann, R. J., & CONNOLLY, K. J. (1998). Psychological state and psychological strain in relation to infertility. Journal Of Community and Applied Social Psychology, 8, (4): 301-311. Further details

Edwards, R., Ungar, S., & BLADES, M. (1998). Route descriptions by visually impaired and sighted children from memory and from maps. Journal Of Visual Impairment and Blindness, 92, (7): 512-521. Further details

Espinosa, M. A., Ungar, S., Ochaita, E., BLADES, M., & C., S. (1998). Comparing methods for introducing blind and visually impaired people to unfamiliar urban environments. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 18, (3): 227-287. Further details

Evans, D., & NORMAN, P. (1998). Understanding pedestrians' road crossing decisions: an application of the theory of planned behaviour. Health Education Research, 13, (4): 481-489. Further details

Farrant, A., BLADES, M., & Boucher, J. (1998). Source monitoring by children with autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 28, (1): 43-50. Further details

Fisk, J. E., & WARR, P. B. (1998). Associative learning and short-term forgetting as a function of age and aspects of working memory. Journal of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences, 53B, 112-121. Further details

Flowers, P., Smith, J. A., SHEERAN, P., & BEAIL, N. (1998). 'Coming out' and sexual debut: Understanding the social context of HIV risk-related behaviour. Journal Of Community and Applied Social Psychology, 8, (6): 409-421. Further details

FRISBY, J. P., Taroyan, N. A., BUCKLEY, D., PORRILL, J., & Whittle, J. (1998). Sequential stereopsis: evidence against the iso-vergence hypothesis? ARVO Abstract. Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, 39, 192.

GURNEY, K., PRESCOTT, A., & REDGRAVE, P. (1998). A model of intrinsic processing in the basal ganglia. "Proceedings of the 2nd Int. Conf. on cognitive and neural systems, Boston".

GURNEY, K., PRESCOTT, A., & REDGRAVE, P. (1998). The basal ganglia viewed as an action selection device. "In The Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks, Sksvde, Sweden", 1033-1038. Further details

GURNEY, K., & Wright, M. (1998). Analysis of direction and orientation changes in plaid stimuli. "Proceedings of ECVP '98, Oxford, UK."

Harrison, L., & TURPIN, G. (1998). Anxiety-related memory biases & psychophysiological responding in generalised anxiety disorder. "38th Meeting of the Society for Psychophysiological Research, Denver, USA. Psychophysiology", 35, (Suppl.1).

Hartley, S. J., PRESCOTT, T. J., & NICOLSON, R. (1998). Experimental and connectionist perspectives on semantic memory development. "The Proceedings of Twentieth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society, Wisconsin, USA", 478-483.

HOCKEY, G. R. J., Wastell, D. G., & Sauer, J. (1998). Effects of sleep deprivation and user-interface on complex performance: A multilevel analysis of compensatory control. Human Factors, 40, 233-253.

HOCKEY, G. R. J., & Westerman, S. J. (1998). Advancing human factors involvement in engineering design: A bridge not far enough? Ergonomics, 41, 147-149.

Hoorens, V., & HARRIS, P. (1998). Distortions in reports of health behaviors: The Time Span Effect and illusory superiority. Psychology and Health, 13, 451-466.

HUNKIN, N. M., Squires, E. J., Aldrich, F. K., & Parkin, A. J. (1998). Errorless learning and the acquisition of word processing skills. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation, 8, 433 - 449.

HUNKIN, N. M., Squires, E. J., Parkin, A. J., & Tidy, J. A. (1998). Are the benefits of errorless learning dependent on implicit memory? Neuropsychologia, 36, 25 - 36.

Ivins, J. P., & PORRILL, J. (1998). A deformable model of the human iris for measuring small three-dimensional eye movements. Machine Vision and Applications, 11, 42-51.

Ivins, J. P., PORRILL, J., & FRISBY, J. P. (1998). A Deformable Model of the Human Iris for Measuring Cyclotorsion. "IEE Proceedings on Vision, Image and Signal Processing", 145, 213-220.

Ivins, J. P., PORRILL, J., & FRISBY, J. P. (1998). The probability density function for linear optic flow components. IAPR International Conference on Pattern Recognition ICPR-98, 1, 234-238.

Jones, F., HARRIS, P., & Waller, H. (1998). Expectations of an exercise prescription scheme: A repertory grid study. British Journal of Health Psychology, 3, 277-289.

Leon, G., Reyes, G., Perez, N., TURPIN, G., & Vila, J. (1998). Anger effects on cardiovascular reactivity in tonic paradigms. Journal of Psychophysiology, 12, (1): 102.

Leon, G., Reyes, G., Perez, N., TURPIN, G., & Vila, J. (1998). Anger modulation of the cardiac defense response (CDR): The effect of frustration/harassment. Journal of Psychophysiology, 12, (1): 102.

Leung, P. W. L., & CONNOLLY, K. J. (1998). Do hyperactive children have motor organization and/or execution deficits? Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, 40, (9); 600-607. Further details

Mason, S., Rowlands, A., TURPIN, G., & Wardrobe, J. (1998). A six month follow up study assessing the psychological impact of injury on 210 male accident and emergency attenders. "International Conference of Accident and Emergency Medicine, Vancouver, Canada".

MAYHEW, J. E. W., Hu, D., ZHENG, Y., Askew, S., Hou, Y., BERWICK, J., et al. (1998). An evaluation of linear model analysis techniques for processing images of microcirculation activity. NeuroImage, 7, (1): 49-71.

MAYHEW, J. E. W., Zhao, L., Hou, Y., BERWICK, J., S., A., ZHENG, Y., et al. (1998). Spectroscopic investigation of the reflectance changes in barrel cortex following whisker stimulation. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, 454, 139-148.

Moores, E., FRISBY, J. P., BUCKLEY, D., Reynolds, E., & FAWCETT, A. J. (1998). Vergence control across saccades in dyslexic adults. Ophthalmology and Physiological Optics, 18, 452-462. Further details

NICKEL, P., Nachreiner, F., Zdobych, A., & Yanagibori, R. (1998). Evaluation of mental workload via the 0.1 Hz component of heartrate variabilityÑsome methodological and technical problems [in German]. Zeitschrift fŸr Arbeits- und Organisationspsychologie, 42, 205-212.

NICOLSON, R. (1998). "Knowledge and memory: The real story - Shank, R C. & Abelson, R.P." British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 16, (4): 572-574.

NORMAN, P., Bennett, P., & Lewis, H. (1998). Understanding binge drinking among young people: an application of the theory of planned behaviour. Health Education Research, 13, 163-169. Further details

NORMAN, P., Bennett, P., Smith, C., & Murphy, S. (1998). Health locus of control and health behaviour. Journal of Health Psychology, 3, 171-180.

Orbell, S., & SHEERAN, P. (1998). Inclined abstainers: A problem for predicting health-related behaviour. British Journal of Social Psychology, 37, 151-165. Further details

Orbell, S., & SHEERAN, P. (1998). Regulation of behaviour in pursuit of health goals: Commentary. Psychology and Health, 13, 753-758.

Parker, S. K., WALL, T. D., & Jackson, P. R. (1998). No easy roads to employee involvement. Academy of Management Executive, 12, 83-84.

Parkin, A. J., HUNKIN, N. M., & Squires, E. J. (1998). Unlearning John Major: The use of errorless learning in the reacquisition of proper names following herpes simplex encephalitis. Cognitive Neuropsychology, 15, 361 - 375.

PARSONS, L. M., Gabrieli, J. D. E., Phelphs, E. A., & Gazzaniga, M. S. (1998). Cerebrally-lateralized mental representations of hand shape and movement. Journal of Neuroscience, 18, 6539 - 6548.

PASCALIS, O., & Bachevalier, J. (1998). Face recognition in Primates: a cross species study. Behavioural Processes, 43, 87-96. Further details

PASCALIS, O., de Haan, M., Nelson, C. A., & S., d. S. (1998). Long term recognition assessed by visual paired comparison in 3- and 6-month-old infants. "Journal of Experimental Psychology : Learning, Memory and Cognition", 24, 249-260. Further details

Peterson, C. C., & SIEGAL, M. (1998). "Changing focus on the representational mind: Deaf, autistic and normal children's concepts of false photos, false drawings, and false beliefs." British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 16, 301-320.

PORRILL, J., FRISBY, J. P., Adams, W. J., & BUCKLEY, D. (1998). Robust and optimal use of information in stereo vision. Nature, 397, (6714): 6763-6766. Further details

PORRILL, J., FRISBY, J. P., Adams, W. J., & BUCKLEY, D. (1998). "Modelling vertical-disparity pooling by the human visual system by an ideal-observer analysis, ECVP-98." Perception, 27, 104.

Rivolier, J., Bachelard, C., Cazes, G., Gaud, R., Le-Scanff, C., Rosnet, E., et al. (1998). A methodological study in a space flight simulation context. European Review of Applied Psychology, 48, 211-212.

SAHAL, A., Maxwell, D. J., Jankowska, E., & Gladden, M. H. (1998). Relationship between noradrenaline and serotonin-immunoreactive axons and hindlimb gamma motoneurones. Journal of Physiology, 509.P, 172P.

Savidge, C., SLADE, P., Stewart, P., & Li, T. C. (1998). Women's persopectives on their experiences of chronic pelvic pain and medical care. Journal of Health Psychology, 3, 103-116.

Shao, Y., MAYHEW, J. E. W., & ZHENG, Y. (1998). Model-driven active visual tracking. Real-time imaging. EE Proceedings Image and Signal Process Real Time Imaging, 4, 349-359.

SHEERAN, P., Abraham, C., & Orbell, S. (1998). Psycholsocial Correlates of heterosexual Condom use: a meta-analysis. Psychological Bulletin, 125, (1): 90-132.

SHEERAN, P., & Orbell, S. (1998). Do intentions predict condom use? A meta-analysis and examination of six moderator variables. British Journal of Social Psychology, 37, 231-250. Further details

Shehab, S., Guadagno, J., Ferguson, K., & REDGRAVE, P. (1998). Regional distribution of the anticonvulsant and behavioural effects of bicuculline injected into the pontine reticular formation of rats. Eur. J. Neurosci, 9, 1875-1884.

Shrayne, N., Westerman, S. J., Crawshaw, C. M., HOCKEY, G. R. J., & Sauer, J. (1998). Task analysis for the investigation of human error in safety critical system design: A convergent methods approach. Ergonomics, 41, 1719-1736.

SIEGAL, M., & Peterson, C. C. (1998). Children's understanding of lies and innocent and negligent mistakes. Developmental Psychology, 34, 332-343. Further details

SLADE, P., Heke, S., Fletcher, J., & Stewart, P. (1998). "A comparison of medical and surgical termination of pregnancy: choice, emotional impact and satisfaction with care." British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 105, 12): 1288-1295. Further details

SPENCER, C. (1998). "Children's participation - Hart, R." Journal of Environmental Psychology, 18, (4): 429-433.

SPENCER, C. (1998). "Children, cities and psychological theories: Developing relationships - Gorlitz, D., Harloff, H.J., May, G. & Valsiner, J." Journal of Environmental Psychology, 18, (4): 429-433.

STONE, J. V. (1998). Information theory: The Holy Grail of cortical computation? Brain and Behavioural Science, 20, (4): 698. Further details

STONE, J. V. (1998). Object Recognition Using Spatiotemporal Signatures. Vision Research, 38, (7): 947-951. Further details

STONE, J. V. (1998). Recognition of rigid Johansson objects mediated by spatiotemporal signatures. Perception, 27, 119.

Tong, Z. Y., Overton, P. G., Martinez-Cue, C., & Clark, D. (1998). Do non-dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area play a role in the responses elicited in A10 dopaminergic neurons by electrical stimulation of the prefrontal cortex? . Exp. Brain Res., 118, 446-476.

Trafimow, D., & SHEERAN, P. (1998). Some tests of the distinction between cognitive and affective beliefs. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 34, 378-397.

Ungar, S., BLADES, M., & C., S. (1998). Effects of orientation on Braille reading by people who are visually impaired: The role of context. Journal Of Visual Impairment and Blindness, 92, (7): 454-463. Further details

Westerman, S. J., Shrayne, N. M., Crawshaw, C. M., HOCKEY, G. R. J., & Wyatt-Millington, C. W. (1998). A work sample analysis of safety-critical programming. International Journal of Quality and Reliability Management, 15, 60-71.

MATTHEWS, D., Lieven, E., Theakston, A., & Tomasello, M. (2009). Pronoun co-referencing errors: challenges for generativist and usage-based accounts. Cognitive Linguistics, 20(3), 599-626. This study tests accounts of co-reference errors whereby children allow ‘‘Mama Bear’’ and ‘‘her’’ to co-refer in sentences like ‘‘Mama Bear is washing her’’ (Chien and Wexler 1990). 63 children aged 4;6, 5;6 and 6;6 participated in a truth-value judgment task augmented with a sentence pro- duction component. There were three major finding: 1) contrary to predic- tions of most generativist accounts, children accepted co-reference even in cases of bound anaphora e.g., ‘‘Every girl is washing her’’ 2) contrary to Thornton and Wexler (1999), errors did not appear to occur because chil- dren understood referring expressions to be denoting the same person in dif- ferent guises 3) contrary to usage-based accounts, errors were less likely in sentences that contained lower as opposed to higher frequency verbs. Error rates also di¤ered significantly according to pronoun type (‘‘him’’, ‘‘her’’, ‘‘them’’). These challenging results are discussed in terms of possible pro- cessing explanations. Further details

MATTHEWS, D., Lieven, E., Theakston, A., & Tomasello, M. (2005). The role of frequency in the acquisition of English word order. Cognitive Development, 20(1), 121-136. Akhtar [Akhtar, N. (1999). Acquiring basic word order: Evidence for data-driven learning of syntactic structure. Journal of Child Language, 26, 339–356] taught children novel verbs in ungrammatical word orders. Her results suggested that the acquisition of canonical word order is a gradual, data-driven process. The current study adapted this methodology, using English verbs of different frequencies, to test whether children's use of word order as a grammatical marker depends upon the frequency of the lexical items being ordered. Ninety-six children in two age groups (2;9 and 3;9) heard either high frequency, medium frequency or low frequency verbs that were modeled in SOV order. Children aged 2;9 who heard low frequency verbs were significantly more likely to adopt the weird word order than those who heard higher frequency verbs. Children aged 3;9 preferred to use SVO order regardless of verb frequency. Furthermore, the younger children reverted to English word order using more arguments as verb frequency increased and used more pronouns than their older counterparts. This suggests that the ability to use English word order develops from lexically specific schemas formed around frequent, distributionally regular items (e.g. verbs, pronouns) into more abstract, productive schemas as experience of the language is accrued. Further details

ARMITAGE, C. J., & Conner, M. (1999). Distinguishing perceptions of control from self-efficacy: Predicting consumption of a low fat diet using the theory of planned behavior. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 29, 72-90. Further details

ARMITAGE, C. J., & Conner, M. (1999). "The theory of planned behaviour: Assessment of predictive validity and ""perceived control""." British Journal of Social Psychology, 38, 35-54. Further details

ARMITAGE, C. J., & Conner, M. (1999). Predictive validity of the theory of planned behaviour: The role of questionnaire format and social desirability. Journal Of Community and Applied Social Psychology, 9, 261-272. Further details

ARMITAGE, C. J., Conner, M., Loach, J., & Willetts, D. (1999). Different perceptions of control: Applying an extended theory of planned behavior to legal and illegal drug use. Basic and Applied Social Psychology, 21, 301-316. Further details

ARMITAGE, C. J., Conner, M., & NORMAN, P. (1999). Differential effects of mood on information processing: evidence from the theories of reasoned action and planned behaviour. European Journal Of Social Psychology, 29, (4): 419-433. Further details

Barnard, P., & MAY, J. (1999). Representing cognitive activity in complex tasks. Human Computer Interaction, 14, 93-158. Further details

Berry, E., NICOLSON, R. I., Foster, J. K., Behrmann, M., & Sagar, H. J. (1999). Slowing of reaction time in Parkinson's disease: the involvement of the frontal lobes. Neuropsychologia, 37, (7): 787-795. Further details

BLADES, M. (1999). Fakultetsopponenten sammanfattar. Lisbeth Aberg-Bengtsson dissertation: 'Entering a graphicate society. Young children learning graphs and charts'. Pedagogisk Forskning i Sverge, 4, 287-289.

BLADES, M., Ungar, S., & SPENCER, C. (1999). Map using by adults with visual impairments. Professional Geographer, 51, (4): 539-553. Further details

Bond, J. M., KENT, G. G., Binney, V. A., & Saleh, M. (1999). Psychological adjustment of children awaiting limb reconstruction treatment. "Child Care, Health and Development", 25, (4): 313-321. Further details

Brain, K., NORMAN, P., Gray, J., & Mansel, R. (1999). Anxiety and adherence to breast self-examination in women with a family history of breast cancer. Psychosomatic Medicine, 61, (2): 181-187. Further details

DAVIES, J., & Coleman, B. A. (1999). Peer Consultation - More Than Just a Trip to the Pub? Clinical Psychology Forum, 131, 13-16.

DEAN, P., PORRILL, J., & Warren, P. A. (1999). Optimality of static force control by horizontal eye muscles: a test of the minimum norm rule. Journal of Neurophysiology, 81, 735-757. Further details

Espejo, A., Goudie, F., & TURPIN, G. (1999). Hospital discharge into to nursing home care: psychological reactions and contributing factors. Aging and Mental Health, 3, (1): 69-78. Further details

Farrant, A., BLADES, M., & Boucher, J. (1999). Recall readiness in children with autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 29, 359-366. Further details

Farrant, A., Boucher, J., & BLADES, M. (1999). Metamemory in children with autism. Child Development, 70, 107-131. Further details

FAWCETT, A. J., & NICOLSON, R. I. (1999). Performance of dyslexic children on cerebellar and cognitive tests. Journal of Motor Behaviour, 31, (1): 68-78. Further details

FAWCETT, A. J., Singleton, C. H., & Peer, L. (1999). Advances in early years screening for dyslexia in the United Kingdom. Annals Of Dyslexia, 48, 57-88. Further details

FRISBY, J. P., BUCKLEY, D., Grant, H., J., G., Hippisley-Cox, S. D., Horsman, J. M., et al. (1999). An orientation anisotropy in the effects of scaling vertical disparities. Vision Research, 39, 481-492. Further details

Ivins, J., PORRILL, J., FRISBY, J., & Orban, G. (1999). The 'ecological' probability density function for linear optic flow: Implications for neurophysiology. Perception, 28, (1): 17-32. Further details

KENT, G. (1999). Responses by four Local Research Ethics Committees to submitted proposals. Journal of Medical Ethics, 25, (3): 274-277. Further details

KENT, G. (1999). Correlates of perceived stigma in vitiligo. Psychology and Health, 14, (2): 241-251. Further details

Lokwan, S. J. A., Overton, P. G., Clark, D., & Berry, M. S. (1999). Stimulation of the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus in the rat produces burst firing in A9 dopaminergic neurons. Neuroscience, 92, 245-254.

MacDougall, N., Dalrymble, D., Carrick, L., Oag, J. S., SAHAL, A., & Gladden, M. H. (1999). The functional organisation of the caudal segments of the rat spinal cord. Journal of Physiology, 521.P, 48P.

Marrow, L., Statham, A., Overton, P. G., Brain, P. F., & Clark, D. (1999). The corticosteroid synthesis inhibitor metyrapone markedly enhances the behavioural effects of d-amphetamine. Addict. Biol, 4, 89-92.

Marrow, L. P., Overton, P. G., Brain, P. F., & Clark, D. (1999). Encounters with aggressive conspecifics enhance the locomotor-activating effects of cocaine in the rat. Addict. Biol, 4, 437-441.

Marrow, L. P., Overton, P. G., Clark, D., & Berry, M. S. (1999). A re-evaluation of social defeat as an animal model of depression. J. Psychopharmacol., 13, 115-121.

Martin, K. M., PAPADAKIS, N. G., Huang, C. L.-H., Hall, L. D., & Carpenter, T. A. (1999). The reduction of the sorting bias in the eigenvalues of the diffusion tensor. Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 17, (6): 893-901.

MAY, J. (1999). Perceptual Principles and Computer Graphics. Computer Graphics Forum, 18, cxix-cxxii.

Mayes, A. R., P.R., G., HUNKIN, N. M., Nunn, J. A., Gregory, L. J., Brammer, M. J., et al. (1999). Storage of verbal associations is sufficient to activate the left medial temporal lobe. Behavioural Neurology, 11(3), 163 - 172.

MAYHEW, J. E. W., ZHENG, Y., Hou, Y., Vuksanovic, B., BERWICK, J., Askew, S., et al. (1999). Spectroscopic analysis of changes in remitted illumination: The response to increased neural activity in brain. NeuroImage, 10, 3): 304-326.

MCKEE, K. J., & Milner, C. (1999). "Modelling the relationships among health, fear of crime, and psychosocial limitation in older people. " Zeitschrift fur geronologie und geriatrie, 32, (2) S2: 766.

McKee, K. J., Newton, P., Bath, P., Philp, I., & ROWSE, G. (1999). ShefSCOPE: using change management to introduce and evaluate health outcome measures in primary health care for older people. Zeitschrift fur Gerontologie und Geriatrie, 32 (sup. 2)(II), 34.

NICOLSON, R. I., & FAWCETT, A. J. (1999). Developmental Dyslexia: The role of the cerebellum. Dyslexia: An International Journal of Research and Practice, 5, 155-177. Further details

NICOLSON, R. I., FAWCETT, A. J., Berry, E. L., Jenkins, I. H., DEAN, P., & Brooks, D. J. (1999). Association of abnormal cerebellar activation with motor learning difficulties in dyslexic adults. Lancet, 353, (9165): 1662-1667. Further details

NICOLSON, R. I., FAWCETT, A. J., Moss, H., & Nicolson, M. K. (1999). Early reading intervention can be effective and cost-effective. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 69, 47-62. Further details

NORMAN, P. (1999). "Perceptions of health and illness: Current research and applications - Petrie, K.J. & Weinman, J.A." British Journal of Health Psychology, 4, (1): 90-91.

NORMAN, P., Bell, R., & Conner, M. (1999). The theory of planned behaviour and smoking cessation. Health Psychology, 18, (1): 89-94. Further details

NORMAN, P., Conner, M., & Bell, R. (1999). The theory of planned behavior and smoking cessation. Health Psychology, 18, 89-94.

Overton, P. G., Richards, C. D., Berry, M. S., & Clark, D. (1999). Long-term potentiation at excitatory amino acid synapses on midbrain dopamine neurons. NeuroReport, 10, 221-226.

PAPADAKIS, N. G., Xing, D., Huang, C. L.-H., Hall, L. D., & Carpenter, T. A. (1999). A comparative study of acquisition schemes for diffusion tensor imaging using MRI. Journal of Magnetic Resonance, 137, 67-82.

PARKER, S. K., & SPRIGG, C. A. (1999). Minimising strain and maximising learning: The role of job demands, job control and proactive personality. Journal of Applied Psychology, 84(6), 925-939.

PASCALIS, O., & Bachevalier, J. (1999). Neonatal aspiration lesions of the hippocampal formation impair visual recognition memory when assessed by paired-comparison task but not by delayed nonmatching-to-sample task. Hippocampus, 9, (6): 609-616. Further details

Patel, H., BLADES, M., & ANDRADE, J. (1999). Children's incidental recall of colours. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 17, 537-549. Further details

Payne, R. L., WALL, T. D., Borrill, C., & Carter, A. (1999). Strain as a moderator of the relationship between work characteristics and work attitudes. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 4, 3-14.

Peterson, C. C., & SIEGAL, M. (1999). "Representing inner worlds: Theory of mind in autistic, deaf, and normal hearing children." Psychological Science, 10, 126-129.

Petit, O., Kim, J. H., & Campbell, R. (1999). Picture perception in primates: the case of face perception. Current Psychology of Cognition, 18, 5. Further details

PORRILL, J., FRISBY, J. P., Adams, W. J., & BUCKLEY, D. (1999). Robust and optimal use of information in stereo vision. Nature, 397, (6714): 6763-6766. Further details

PRESCOTT, T. J., REDGRAVE, P., & GURNEY, K. (1999). Layered control architectures in robots and vertebrates. Adaptive Behavior, 7, 99-127. Further details

REDGRAVE, P., PRESCOTT, T. J., & GURNEY, K. (1999). Is the short latency dopamine burst too short to signal reinforcement error? Trends in Neurosciences, 22, 146-151. Further details

REDGRAVE, P., PRESCOTT, T. J., & GURNEY, K. (1999). The basal ganglia: a vertebrate solution to the selection problem? Neuroscience, 89, 1009-1023. Further details

Sauer, J., HOCKEY, G. R. J., & Wastell, D. G. (1999). Performance evaluation in analogue space environments: adaptation during an 8-month Antarctic over-wintering expedition. Aerospace and Environmental Medicine, 70, 230-235.

Sauer, J., HOCKEY, G. R. J., & Wastell, D. G. (1999). Maintenance of complex performance during a 135-day spaceflight simulation. Aerospace and Environmental Medicine, 70, 236-244.

SHEERAN, P., NORMAN, P., & Orbell, S. (1999). Evidence that intentions based on attitudes better predict behaviour than intentions based on siubjective norms. European Journal Of Social Psychology, 29, 403-406. Further details

SHEERAN, P., & Orbell, S. (1999). Implementation intentions and repeated behaviour: augmenting the predictive validity of the theory of planned behaviour. European Journal Of Social Psychology, 29, 349-369. Further details

SHEERAN, P., Orbell, S., & C., A. (1999). Psycholsocial correlates of heterosexual condom use: a meta-analysis. Psychological Bulletin, 1, 90-132. Further details

SIEGAL, M. (1999). Beyond methodology: Frequently asked questions on the significance of conversation for development. Developmental Science, 2, 29-34.

SIEGAL, M. (1999). Language and thought: The fundamental significance of conversational awareness for cognitive development. Developmental Science, 2, 1-14.

Spiby, H., Henderson, B., SLADE, P., Escott, D., & Fraser, R. B. (1999). Strategies for coping with labour: does antenatal education translate into practice? Journal of Advanced Nursing, 29, (2): 388-394. Further details

STONE, J. V. (1999). Object Recognition: View-Specificity and Motion-Specificity. Vision Research, 39, (24): 4032-4044. Further details

STONE, J. V., & N., H. (1999). Temporal Constraints on Visual Learning: A Computational Model. Perception, 28, 2. Further details

TURPIN, G., Schaefer, F., & Boucsein, W. (1999). "Effects of stimulus intensity, risetime, and duration on autonomic and behavioural responding: Implications for the differentiation of orienting, startle, and defence responses." Psychophysiology, 36, (4): 453-463. Further details

WALSH, S. (1999). Shame in the workplace. Psychologist, 12, (1): 20-22.

Waterson, P., CLEGG, C. W., Bolden, R., Pepper, K., WARR, P. B., & WALL, T. D. (1999). The use and effectiveness of modern manufacturing practices: A survey of UK industry. International Journal of Production Research, 37, 2271-2292.

Winter, J., & HUNKIN, N. M. (1999). Errorless learning in Alzheimer's Disease. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 14, 983 - 990.

Wright, M. J., & GURNEY, K. (1999). Visual discrimination of direction changes based upon two types of angular motion. Vision Research, 39, (11): 1927-1941. Further details

ZHENG, Y., Vuksanovic, B., Hou, Y., & MAYHEW, J. E. W. (1999). Monte Carlo simulations and the spectroscopic analysis of the response to neural stimulation in brain. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, 471, 785-794.

ANDRADE, J. (2000). Anaesthesia as a tool for exploring consciousness (invited and peer-reviewed workshop). Consciousness and Cognition, 9(2), S19.

ARMITAGE, C. J., & Conner, M. (2000). Attitudinal ambivalence: A test of three key hypotheses. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 26, 1421-1432. Further details

ARMITAGE, C. J., & Conner, M. (2000). Social cognition models and health behaviour: A structured review. Psychology and Health, 15, 173-189. Further details

Baddeley, A., & ANDRADE, J. (2000). Working memory and the vividness of imagery. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 129, (1): 126-145.

Barnard, P. J., MAY, J., Duke, D., & Duce, D. (2000). "Systems, Interactions and Macrotheory." ACM Transactions on Computer Human Interaction, 0.291666667, 222-262. Further details

Birchwood, M., IQBAL, Z., Chadwick, P., & Trower, P. (2000). A cognitive approach to depression and suicidal thinking in psychosis I: the ontogeny of postpsychotic depression. British Journal of Psychiatry, 177(6), 516-521.

Black, M., EiSER, C., & Krishnakmar, A. (2000). International research and practice in pediatric psychology: Challenges and new directions. Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 25, 363-366.

BLADES, M., Ungar, S., & SPENCER, C. P. (2000). Map using by adults with visual impairments. Professional Geographer, 51, 539-553.

Bockhorst, K. H. J., Smith, J. M., Smith, M. I., Bradley, D. P., Houston, G. C., Carpenter, T. A., et al. (2000). A quantitative analysis of cortical spreading depression events in the feline brain characterized with diffusion-weighted MRI. Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 12, 616-624.

Booth, S., Faconti, G., Massink, M., Bordegoni, M., De Angelis, F., & MAY, J. (2000). Intersensory disambiguation of shape perception with virtual visuo-haptic stimuli. Proceedings of First Workshop on Haptic Human-Computer Interaction, Glasgow Sept 2000, 76-77.

Brain, K., Gray, J., NORMAN, P., Parsons, E., Clarke, A., Rogers, C., et al. (2000). Why do women attend familial breast cancer clinics? Journal of Medical Genetics, 37, 197-202.

Coca, D., Y, Z., MAYHEW, J. E. W., & Billings, S. A. (2000). Nonlinear system identification and analysis of complex dynamical behaviour in reflected light measurements of vasomotion. International Journal of Bifurcation and Chaos, 10, (2): 461-476.

Conner, M., SHEERAN, P., NORMAN, P., & ARMITAGE, C. J. (2000). Temporal stability as a moderator of relationships in the Theory of Planned Behaviour. British Journal of Social Psychology, 39, 469-493. Further details

Czarnockca, J., & SLADE, P. (2000). Prevalence and predictors of post traumatic stress symptoms following childbirth. British Journal Clinical Psychology, 39, 35-52.

DAVIES, J., Salmon, A., & MacDonald, F. (2000). Supervision - What works for whom? Clinical Psychology Forum, 146, 17-20.

EISER, C., & EISER, J. R. (2000). Social comparisons and quality of life among survivors of childhood cancer and their mothers. Psychology and Health, 15, 435-450.

EISER, C., Hill, J., & Blacklay, A. (2000). Surviving cancer: What does it mean to you? An evaluation of information for survivors of childhood cancer. Psycho-Oncology, 9, 214-220.

EISER, C., Hill, J., & Vance, Y. H. (2000). Examining the psychological consequences of surviving childhood cancer: The systematic review as a research method in pediatric psychology. Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 25, 449-460.

EISER, C., Mohay, H., & Morse, R. (2000). The measurement of quality of life in young children. "Child: Care, Health and Development", 26, 401-414.

EISER, C., Vance, Y. H., & Seamark, D. (2000). The development of a theoretically driven generic measure of quality of life for children aged 6-12 years. "Child: Care, Health and Development", 26, 445-456.

EISER, J. R. (2000). The influence of question framing on symptom report and perceived health status. Psychology and Health, 15, 13-20.

EISER, J. R., Pendry, L., Greaves, C. J., Melia, J., Hartland, C., & Moss, S. (2000). Is targeted early detection for melanoma feasible? Self assessments of risk and attitudes to screening. Journal of Medical Screening, 7, 199-202.

Evans, J. J., Wilson, B. A., Schuri, U., ANDRADE, J., Baddeley, A., Bruna, O., et al. (2000). A comparison of 'errorless' and 'trial and error' learning methods for teaching individuals with acquired memory disorders. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation, 10, (1): 67-101. Further details

Georgiou, A. J., SPENCER, C. P., Davies, G. K., & Stamp, J. (2000). Electrical Stimulation Therapy in the treatment of cigarette smoking. Journal of Substance Abuse, 10, 265-274.

Gladden, M. H., Maxwell, D. J., SAHAL, A., & Jankowska, E. (2000). Coupling between serotoninergic and noradrenergic neurones and gamma motoneurones in the cat. Journal of Physiology, 527.2, 213-223.

Gladden, M. H., & SAHAL, A. (2000). "Gamma motoneurones, asphyxia and opiates." Journal of Physiology, 527.P, 136P.

Golledge, R., Jacobson, D., & BLADES, M. (2000). "Cognitive maps, spatial abilities & human wayfinding." Geographical Review of Japan, 73, 93-104.

Gray, J., Brain, K., Anglim, C., Barton, G., Branston, L., Parsons, E., et al. (2000). A model protocol evaluating the introduction of genetic assessment for women with a family history of breast cancer. Journal of Medical Genetics, 37, 192-196.

Greenhalgh, R., SLADE, P., & Spiby, H. (2000). Coping style, antenatal preparation and fathers' experiences of labour. Birth, 27, 177-184.

Griffin, M. A., & Neal, A. (2000). Perceptions of safety at work: A framework for linking safety climate to safety performance, knowledge, and motivation. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 5, 347-358.

Griffin, M. A., Neal, A., & Neale, M. (2000). The contribution of task performance and contextual performance to effectiveness: Investigating the role of situational constraints. Applied Psychology: An International Review, 49, 516-532.

HANNA, C., Varma, S., ANDRADE, J., & Edwards, N. (2000). Learning during surgery. British Journal of Anaesthesia, 87, (1): 654P.

HARRIS, P., Middleton, W., & Joiner, R. (2000). The typical student as an in group member: Eliminating optimistic bias by reducing social distance. European Journal Of Social Psychology, 30, 235-255.

HERBERT, J., & Hayne, H. (2000). Memory retrieval by 18- to 30-month-olds: Age-related changes in representational flexibility. Developmental Psychology, 36, (4): 473-484. Further details

HERBERT, J., & Hayne, H. (2000). The ontogeny of long-term retention during the second year of life. Developmental Science, 3, 50-56. Further details

HOCKEY, G. R. J., Maule, A. J., Clough, P. J., & Bdzola, L. (2000). Effects of negative mood states on risk in everyday decision making. Cognition and Emotion. Cognition and Emotion, 14, 823-855.

Houston, G. C., PAPADAKIS, N. G., Carpenter, T. A., Hall, L. D., Mukherjee, B. M., James, M. F., et al. (2000). Mapping of the cerebral response to hypoxia measured using graded asymmetric spin echo EPI. Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 18, (9): 1043-1054.

Howe, A., Bath, P., Goudie, F., Lothian, K., McKee, K., Newton, P., et al. (2000). Getting the question right - an example of loss of validity during transfer of a brief screening approach for depression in the elderly. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 15, 650-655.

Hughes, J., HARDY, G. E., & Kendrick, D. (2000). Assessing adult attachment status with clinically orientated interviews: A brief report. British Journal of Medical Psychology, 73, 279-283.

HUNKIN, N. M., Mayes, A. R., Williams, S. C. R., Gregory, L. J., Nunn, J. A., Nicholas, A. K., et al. (2000). Does frontal lobe activation during retrieval reflect complexity of retrieved information? . NeuroReport, 11, 557 - 561.

HUNKIN, N. M., STONE, J. V., Isaac, C. L., Holdstock, J. S., Butterfield, R., Wallis, L. I., et al. (2000). Factor analysis of three standardized tests of memory in a clinical population. British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 39, 169 - 180.

IQBAL, Z., Birchwood, M., Chadwick, P., & Trower, P. (2000). A cognitive approach to depression and suicidal thinking in psychosis II: testing the validity of a social ranking model. British Journal of Psychiatry, 177(6), 522-528.

Jones, F., HARRIS, P., & Chrispin, C. (2000). Catching the sun: an investigation of sun exposure and skin protective behaviour. Psychology, Health and Medicine, 5, 131-141.

Keen, J., Oliver, P., ROWSE, G., & Mathers, N. (2000). Keeping families of heroin addicts together: results of a thirteen months’ intake for community detoxification and rehabilitation at a Family Centre for drug users. Family Practice, 17, 484-489. Background. Heroin addiction is a major public health problem affecting both the addicted individuals and their children, who have been shown to have poor social, educational and health status and to be at higher risk of abuse than their peers. Whilst the antenatal effects of parental drug use and the overall poor outcomes for these children have been widely studied, there has been little emphasis on the effectiveness of treatment interventions and even less emphasis on evaluating the effect on children of the standard treatments aimed at their parents' drug use. Objectives. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect on heroin-addicted parents and their children of a family-based drug treatment intervention using a records-based methodology, and to identify any factors at admission which may influence outcome. This study is a pilot for a prospective Europe-wide study using a similar methodology prospectively in several treatment modalities. Methods. A retrospective cohort study was carried out using existing clinical and residential record data. The setting was a residential family centre run by the charity Phoenix House in Sheffield, UK, offering a 6-month (180 days) family-based programme for heroin addicts including community detoxification overseen by primary care specialist doctors and residential rehabilitation. All adults and children who entered the centre between July 1997 and July 1998 were included in the study (26 adults and 33 children, in 23 family groups). An analysis was made of clinical records and records kept on the adults and children by the clinicians and staff at the centre. The main outcome measures for the adults were length of stay and reason for departure (treatment complete, early planned discharge, unplanned discharge, eviction); and for the children were reason for departure and discharge destination (with parent or taken into care). Results. Mean length of stay was 110 days, and only 11 children (33%) and nine adults (35%) completed 150 days or more. Length of stay was found to be significantly correlated with parental age at admission (P < 0.01). Twelve children (37%) and nine adults (35%) were deemed to have completed treatment successfully. Of the remainder, 14 children (42%) and 11 adults (42%) left because of definite treatment failure. Successful treatment completion was found to be correlated with increased parental age (Pearson's r = 0.612, P = 0.001). Poly-drug users were significantly less likely to complete treatment successfully (Fisher's exact test, P = 0.012). Twenty children were in the care of their parents on admission, and 24 were able to go home with their parents. There was no association between residence with parents pre- and post-admission (McNemar's chi-squared test = 1.6, P 0.1). Conclusions. Whilst overall high rates of treatment success are not expected in abstinence-based programmes, the outcomes for the adults in this setting are comparable with published results in other residential settings, and there is some evidence that some families may have stayed together who might otherwise have been separated. Older adults who were not poly-drug users had significantly better outcomes. The records-based methodology proved successful, but centres need to keep detailed and preferably long-term records on children if their outcomes are to be evaluated more fully. Keywords. Addiction, children, heroin, outcomes, treatment. Further details

Keen, J., ROWSE, G., Mathers, N., Campbell, M., & Seivewright, N. (2000). Can methadone maintenance for heroin-dependent patients retained in general practice reduce criminal conviction rates and time spent in prison? British Journal of General Practice, 50, 48-49. A retrospective analysis was made of the criminal records of 57 patients successfully retained in methadone maintenance at two general practices in Sheffield. Their criminal conviction rates and time spent in prison per year were compared for the periods before and after the start of their methadone programme. Overall, patients retained on methadone programmes in the general practices studied had significantly fewer convictions and cautions, and spent significantly less time in prison than they had before the start of treatment. Further details

KENT, G., Howie, H., Fletcher, M., Newbury-Ecob, R., & Hosie, K. (2000). "The relationship between perceived risk, thought intrusiveness and emotional well-being in women receiving couselling for breast cancer risk in a family history clinic. " British Journal of Health Psychology, 5, 15-26.

Lancaster, J., Woldorff, M. G., PARSONS, L. M., Liotti, M., Freitas, C. S., Rainey, L., et al. (2000). Automatic Talairach labels for functional brain mapping. Human Brain Mapping, 10, 120-131. Further details

Langdridge, D., CONNOLLY, K. J., & SHEERAN, P. (2000). A network analytic study of reasons for wanting a child. Journal of Reproductive and Infant Psychology, 18, 321-338.

Larsen, J. D., Baddeley, A., & ANDRADE, J. (2000). Phonological similarity and the irrelevant speech effect: Implications for models of short-term verbal memory. Memory, 8, (3): 145-157. Further details

Ling, J., & BLADES, M. (2000). The effect of a nonverbal aid on preschoolers recall of colour. Journal of Genetic Psychology, 161, 314-324.

Liu, Y., Pu, Y., Gao, J. H., PARSONS, L. M., Xiong, J., Liotti, M., et al. (2000). The human red nucleus and lateral cerebellum in cooperative roles supporting sensory discrimination. Human Brain Mapping 10, 147-159. Further details

Lokwan, S. J. A., OVERTON, P. G., Clark, D., & Berry, M. S. (2000). The medial prefrontal cortex plays an important role in the excitation of A10 dopaminergic neurons following intravenous muscimol administration. Neuroscience, 95, 647 - 656.

Lokwan, S. J. A., Overton, P. G., Clark, D., & Berry, M. S. (2000). The medial prefrontal cortex plays an important role in the excitation of A10 dopaminergic neurons following intravenous muscimol administration. Neuroscience, 95, 647-656.

Maierhofer, N., Griffin, M. A., & Sheehan, M. (2000). Organizational values and safety at work: The impact of manager values and behavior on employee values and behavior. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 5, 417-427.

Martindale, J., Berwick, J., Johnston, D., Jones, M., Zheng, Y., Coffey, P., et al. (2000). Pseudo-random procedures for rapid presentation rates using optical imaging and spectroscopy. NeuroReport, 10, 2247-2252.

Maughan, B., Pickles, A., Rowe, R., Costello, J., & Angold, A. (2000). Developmental trajectories of aggressive and non-aggressive conduct problems. Journal of Quantitative Criminology, 16(2), 199-221.

Maule, A. J., HOCKEY, G. R. J., & Bbzola, L. (2000). Effects of time pressure on decision making under uncertainty: Changes in affective state and information processing strategy. Acta Psychologica, 104, 283-301.

MAY, J. (2000). Perceptual Principles and Computer Graphics. Computer Graphics Forum, 19, 271-279. Further details

MAYHEW, J. E. W., JOHNSTON, D., BERWICK, J., JONES, M., Coffey, P., & ZHENG, Y. (2000). Spectroscopic analysis of neural activity in brain: Increased oxygen consumption following activation of barrel cortex. NeuroImage, 12, (6): 664-675.

Melia, J., Harland, C., Moss, S., EISER, J. R., & Pendry, L. (2000). Feasibility of targeted early detection for melanoma: a population-based screening survey. "British Journal of Cancer," 82, 1605-1609.

Milne, S., SHEERAN, P., & Orbell, S. (2000). Prediction and intervention in health-related behaviour: A meta-analytic review of protection motivation theory. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 30, 106-143. Further details

Moores, E., & ANDRADE, J. (2000). Ability of dyslexic and control teenagers to sustain attention and inhibit responses. European Journal of Cognitive Psychology, 12, (4): 520-540. Further details

Neal, A., Griffin, M. A., & Hart, P. M. (2000). The impact of organizational climate on safety climate and individual behavior. Safety Science, 34, 99-109.

NICOLSON, R. I., & FAWCETT, A. J. (2000). Long-term learning in dyslexic children. European Journal of Cognitive Psychology, 12, 357-393. Further details

Orbell, S., & SHEERAN, P. (2000). Motivational and volitional processes in action initiation: A field study of the role of implementation intentions. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 30, 780-797. Further details

OVERTON, P. G., Clark, D., Berry, M. S., & Lokwan, S. J. A. (2000). D-amphetamine potentiates muscimol-induced disinhibition of A10 dopaminergic neurons in the rat. Neural Transm., 107, 1381 - 1391.

Overton, P. G., Clark, D., Berry, M. S., & Lokwan, S. J. A. (2000). D-amphetamine potentiates muscimol-induced disinhibition of A10 dopaminergic neurons in the rat. J. Neural Transm., 107, 1381-1391.

OVERTON, P. G., Marrow, L. P., Brain, P. F., & Clark, D. (2000). Certain clinically-utilised antibiotics enhance the behavioural effects of cocaine. Addict. Biol, 5(283 - 288).

Overton, P. G., Marrow, L. P., Brain, P. F., & Clark, D. (2000). Certain clinically-utilised antibiotics enhance the behavioural effects of cocaine. Addict. Biol, 5, 283-288.

Pande, K., McClosky, E. V., de Takats, D., Edwards, V., SLADE, P., & Kanis, J. A. (2000). Development of a Questionnaire to assess patients' knowledge about Osteoporosis. Maturitas, 37, 75 - 81.

PAPADAKIS, N. G., Martin, K. M., Pickard, J. D., Hall, L. D., Carpenter, T. A., & Huang, C. L.-H. (2000). Gradient preemphasis calibration in diffusion-weighted echo-planar imaging. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 44, 616-624.

PAPADAKIS, N. G., Murrills, C. D., Hall, L. D., Huang, C. L.-H., & Carpenter, T. A. (2000). Minimal spatially uniform gradient encoding for robust estimation of diffusion anisotropy. Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 18, (6): 671-679.

PARKER, S. K. (2000). From passive to proactive motivation: The importance of flexible role orientations and role breadth self-efficacy. Applied Psychology: An International Review, 49(3), 447-469.

PARSONS, L. M., A., H., Trehub, S., Spintge, R., & Hodges, D. A. (2000). In their own words: A virtual panel of expert researchers. Special Focus Issue on Music and the Brain. Music Educators Journal

PARSONS, L. M., Denton, D., Egan, G., McKinley, M., Shade, R. M., Lancaster, J., et al. (2000). Neuroimaging evidence implicating cerebellum in support of sensory/cognitive processes associated with thirst. Proceedings of National Academy of Science USA, 97, 2332-2336. Further details

PASCALIS, O., & de Haan, M. (2000). Subcortical Lesion-Cortical Lesion: What About The Hippocampus? (Commentary). Developmental Science.

Peterson, C. C., & SIEGAL, M. (2000). Insights into theory of mind from deafness and autism. Mind and Language, 15, 123-145.

Price, K., Lang, J., EISER, C., & Tripp, J. H. (2000). Dietary advice in diabetes: Prescribed versus unrestricted carbohydrate. Diabetic Medicine, 10, 962-967.

Riazi, A., Hammersley, S., EISER, C., EISER, J. R., & Tooke, J. E. (2000). Patients' experiences of the diabetes annual review. Practical Diabetes, 17, 226-230.

Roberts, K. P., & BLADES, M. (2000). Children's memory and source monitoring for real-life and televised events. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 20, 575-596. Further details

SAHAL, A. (2000). Neglected obstacles in the manned exploration of space. Spaceflght, 42, (1) 10.

Sauer, J., HOCKEY, G. R. J., & Wastell, D. G. (2000). The effects of training on short- and long-term skill retention in a multiple task environment. Ergonomics, 43, 2043-2064.

Sauer, J., Wastell, D. G., & HOCKEY, G. R. J. (2000). A conceptual framework for designing micro-worlds for complex work domains: a case study of the Cabin Air Management System. Computers in Human Behavior, 16, 45-58.

SHEERAN, P., & Orbell, S. (2000). Using implementation intentions to increase attendance for crevical cancer screening. Health Psychology, 18, 283-289. Further details

SHEERAN, P., & Orbell, S. (2000). Self-schemas and the theory of planned behaviour. European Journal Of Social Psychology, 30, 533-550. Further details

SLADE, P., Escott, D., Spiby, H., Henderson, B., & Fraser, R. B. (2000). Antenatal predictors of use of coping strategies in labour. Psychology and Health, 15, 555-569.

Smith, M. D., Wiseman, R., & HARRIS, P. (2000). The relationship between "luck" and Psi. The Journal of the American Society for Psychical Research, 94, 25-36.

SPENCER, C. P., Dunn, J., & Woolley, H. (2000). Participating in their towns: Children Feel Ignored. Streetwise: Special Issue ed. Selma Mountford, 10, (3): 16-18.

SPENCER, C. P., & Woolley, H. (2000). Children and the City: A summary of recent Environmental Psychology research. "Child: Care, Health and Development", 26, 1-18.

SPRIGG, C. A., Jackson, P. R., & Parker, S. K. (2000). Production teamworking: The importance of interdependence and autonomy for employee strain and satisfaction. Human Relations, 53, (11): 1591-1643. Further details

Stapleton, C., & ANDRADE, J. (2000). An investigation of learning during propofol sedation and anaesthesia using the process dissociation procedure. Anesthesiology, 93, (6): 1418-1425. Further details

STONE, J. V., BUCKLEY, D., & Moger, F. A. (2000). Determinants of object recognition. Vision Research, 40, 2723-2736. Further details

Sutton, G., & Griffin, M. A. (2000). Transition from student to practitioner: The role of expectations, values, and personality. British Journal of Occupational Therapy.

TAROYAN, N. A., BUCKLEY, D., PORRILL, J., & FRISBY, J. P. (2000). Exploring sequential stereopsis for co-planarity tasks. Vision Research, 40, 3373-3390. Further details

Varley, R., & SIEGAL, M. (2000). Evidence for cognition without grammar from causal reasoning and 'theory of mind' in an agrammatic aphasic patient. Current Biology, 10, 723-726.

Varley, R., & SIEGAL, M. (2000). Language and thought: Does grammar make us smart? Current Biology, 10.

Wang, S., Wang, H., Niemi-Junkola, U., Westby, G. M. W., McHaffie, J. G., Stein, B. E., et al. (2000). Parallel Analyses of Nociceptive Neurones in Rat Superior Colliculus by using c-fos Immunohistochemistry and Electrophysiology Under Different Conditions of Anaesthesia. Journal of Comparative Neurology, 425, 599-615.

Waterman, A., BLADES, M., & SPENCER, C. (2000). Do children try to answer nonsensical questions? British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 18, 211-225.

Waters, L. J., SIEGAL, M., & Slaughter, V. (2000). Development of reasoning and the tension between scientific and conversational inference. Social Development, 9, 383-396.

Woolley, H., Dunn, J., SPENCER, C. P., Short, T., & Rowley, G. (2000). Children describe their experiences of the city centre: a qualitiative study of the fears and concerns which may limit their full participation. Landscape Research: special issue on landscapes of defence, 24, 287-301.

Woolley, H., SPENCER, C. P., Dunn, J., & Rowley, G. (2000). The child as citizen: experiences of British town and city centres. Journal of Urban Design, 4, 255-282.

Yim, Y. Y., Varley, R. A., & ANDRADE, J. (2000). The contribution of finger tracing to the recognition of Chinese characters. International Journal of Communication Disorders, 35, (4): 561-571. Further details

Anderson, I., Beattie, G., & SPENCER, C. (2001). Can blaming victims of rape be logical? Attribution theory and discourse analytic perspectives. Human Relations, 54, (14): 445-467. Further details

ANDRADE, J., Englert, L., Harper, C., & Edwards, N. (2001). Comparing the effects of stimulation and propofol infusion rate on implicit and explicit memory formation. British Journal of Anaesthesia, 86, (2): 189-195.

ARMITAGE, C. J., & Conner, M. (2001). Efficacy of the theory of planned behaviour: A meta-analytic review. British Journal of Social Psychology, 40, 471-499. Further details

ARMITAGE, C. J., & Conner, M. (2001). Social cognitive determinants of blood donation. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 31, 1431-1457. Further details

ARMITAGE, C. J., & Conner, M. (2001). Efficacy of a minimal intervention to reduce fat intake. Social Science and Medicine, 52, 1517-1524. Further details

Barkham, M., & HARDY, G. E. (2001). Counselling and interpersonal therapies for depression: Towards securing an evidence base. British Medical Bulletin, 57, 115-132. Further details

Barnard, P., MAY, J., & Scott, S. (2001). "When the Central Executive lets us down: schemas, attention and load in a generative working memory task." Memory, 9, 209-221. Further details

Downes, J. J., Mackay, C. E., Tsivilis, D., Mayes, A. R., Montaldi, D., HUNKIN, N. M., et al. (2001). Prefrontal cortical activation during word-associative, face-associative, and word-face-associative encoding. Brain and Cognition, 47, 69 - 72.

EISER, C., Molkenboer, A. S., Stride, C., & Grimer, R. (2001). "Quality of life implications as a consequence of surgery: limb salvage, primary and secondary amputation". Sarcoma, 5, 189-195.

EISER, C., & Morse, R. (2001). A review of measures of quality of life for children with chronic illness. Archives of Disease in Childhood, 84, 205-211.

EISER, C., & Morse, R. (2001). Quality of life measures in chronic diseases of childhood. Health Technology Assessment, 5 (4).

EISER, C., & Morse, R. (2001). Can parents rate their child's health related quality of life? Results of a systematic review. Quality of Life Research, 10, 347-357. Further details

EISER, C., & Morse, R. (2001). The measurement of quality of life in children: Past and future perspectives. Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, 22, pp 1-9.

EISER, C., & Tillman, V. (2001). Late cognitive effects for survivors of ALL. Paediatric Rehabilitation, 4, 105-118.

EISER, C., & Vance, Y. H. (2001). Implications of cancer for school attendance and behavior: A review. Medical and Pediatric Oncology, 36, pp 1-3.

EISER, J. R., EiSER, C., Riazi, A., Taylor, D. J., Hammersley, S., & Tooke, J. E. (2001). Screening for diabetic retinopathy is well received by patients and may improve self-management intentions. Diabetic Medicine, 18, 835-841.

EISER, J. R., Pahl, S., & Prins, Y. R. A. (2001). "Optimism, pessimism, and the direction of self-other comparisons." Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 37, 77-84.

EISER, J. R., Riazi, A., EISER, C., Hammersley, S., & Tooke, J. E. (2001). 2001 Predictors of psychological well-being in types 1 and 2 diabetes. Psychology and Health, 16, 99-110.

Farrand, P., Rowe, R., Johnson, A., & Murdoch, H. (2001). "Prevalence, age of onset and demographic relationships of different areca nut habits amongst children in Tower Hamlets, London." British Dental Journal, 190(3), 150-154.

Farrow, T. F. D., ZHENG, Y., Wilkinson, I. D., Spence, S. A., Deakin, J. F. W., Tarrier, N., et al. (2001). Investigating the functional anatomy of empathy and forgiveness. NeuroReport, 12, (11): 2433-2438.

Fletcher, P. C., Anderson, J. M., Shanks, D. R., Honey, R., Carpenter, T. A., Donovan, T., et al. (2001). Responses of human frontal cortex to surprising events are predicted by formal associative learning theory. Nature Neuroscience, 4, (10): 1043-1048.

Fox, P. T., Huang, A., PARSONS, L. M., Xiong, J., Zamarippa, F., & Lancaster, J. (2001). Location-probability profiles for the mouth region of human primary motor-sensory cortex: model and validation. NeuroImage, (13), 196-209. Further details

G.C., H., PAPADAKIS, N. G., T.A., C., L.D., H., B.M., M., M.F., J., et al. (2001). Mapping of brain activation in response to pharmacological agents using fMRI in the rat. Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 19, (7): 905-919. Further details

Gillard, J. H., PAPADAKIS, N. G., K., M., Price, C. J. S., Warburton, E. A., Antoun, N. M., et al. (2001). MR diffusion tensor imaging of white matter tract disruption in stroke at 3T. British Journal of Radiology, 74, 642-647.

Gilli, G., Marchetti, A., SIEGAL, M., & Peterson, C. C. (2001). Children’s incipient ability to distinguish mistakes from lies: An Italian investigation. International Journal of Behavioural Development, 25, 88-92.

Gladden, M. H., SAHAL, A., & Matsuzaki, H. (2001). Responses of gamma motoneurones to Apnoea. Journal of Physiology, 531.P, 144P.

Griffin, M. A. (2001). Dispositions and work reactions: A multilevel approach. Journal of Applied Psychology, 86, 1142-1151. Further details

GRIFFIN, M. A., Mathieu, J. E., & Jacobs, R. (2001). Perceptions of work contexts: Disentangling effects at multiple levels of analysis. Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, 74, 563-579.

Griffin, M. A., Patterson, M., & West, M. A. (2001). Job satisfaction and team work: The role of supervisory support. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 22, 537-550.

GURNEY, K. (2001). Information processing in dendrites II: information theoretic complexity. Neural Networks, 14, 1005-1022.

GURNEY, K. (2001). Information processing in dendrites I: input pattern generalisation. Neural Networks, 14, 991-1004.

GURNEY, K., PRESCOTT, T. J., & REDGRAVE, P. (2001). A computational model of action selection in the basal ganglia II: Analysis and simulation of behaviour. Biological Cybernetics, 84, 411-423.

GURNEY, K., PRESCOTT, T. J., & REDGRAVE, P. (2001). A computational model of action selection in the basal ganglia I: A new functional anatomy. Biological Cybernetics, 84, 401-410.

Hajek, P., West, R., Lee, A., Foulds, J., Owen, L., EISER, J. R., et al. (2001). Randomized controlled trial of a midwife-delivered brief smoking cessation intervention in pregnancy. Addiction, 96, 485-494.

HARDY, G. E., Cahill, J., Shapiro, D. A., Barkham, M., Rees, A., & MacAskill, N. (2001). Client interpersonal and cognitive styles as predictors of response to time limited cognitive therapy for depression. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 69, 841-845. Further details

HUMPHRIES, M. D., & GURNEY, K. (2001). A pulsed neural network model of bursting in the basal ganglia. Neural Networks, 14, 845-863.

Hurell, E., & SLADE, P. (2001). Memory and the perimenopausal woman: clinical implications of recent research findings. British Journal of the Menopause Society, 7, 61-65.

Jacobson, D., Lippa, Y., Golledge, R. G., Kitchin, R., & BLADES, M. (2001). Rapid development of cognitive maps in people with visual impairments when exploring novel geographic spaces. Bulletin of People-Environment Studies, 18, 3-6.

Jones, F., Abraham, C., HARRIS, P., Schulz, J., & Chrispin, C. (2001). From knowledge to action regulation: Modeling the cognitive prerequisites of sun screen use in Australian and UK samples. Psychology and Health, 16, 191-206.

Jones, M., Berwick, J., Johnston, D., & MAYHEW, J. E. W. (2001). "Concurrent optical imaging spectroscopy and laser-Doppler flowmetry: the relationship between blood flow, oxygenation and volume in rodent barrel cortex." NeuroImage, Vol 13, "No. 6, 1002-1015".

Kavanagh, D., Freese, S., ANDRADE, J., & MAY, J. (2001). Effects of Visuospatial Tasks on Desensitization to Emotive Memories. British Journal Of Clinical Psychology, 40, 267-280.

Keen, J., Oliver, P., ROWSE, G., & N., M. (2001). Residential rehabilitation for drug users: A review of 13 months intake to a therapeutic community. Family Practice, 18, 545-548. Further details

Llewelyn, S., & HARDY, G. E. (2001). Making use of process research in understanding and applying psychological therapies. British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 40. Further details

Loewy, A. D., Westby, G. W. M., & REDGRAVE, P. (2001). Superior colliculus projections to midline and intralaminar thalamic nuclei of the rat. Journal of Comparative Neurology, 431, 198-216. Further details

MAY, J., Alcock, K., Robinson, L., & Mwita, C. (2001). A computerised test of speed of language comprehension unconfounded by literacy. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 15, 433-444. Further details

MAY, J., Alcock, K., Robinson, L., & Mwita, C. (2001). A linguistic reasoning task for preliterate children. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 15, 433-444.

Mayes, A. R., Isaac, C. L., Holdstock, J. S., HUNKIN, N. M., Montaldi, D., Downes, J. J., et al. (2001). Memory for single items, word pairs, and temporal order of different kinds in a patient with selective hippocampal lesions. Cognitive Neuropsychology, 18, 97 - 123.

MAYHEW, J. E. W., JOHNSTON, D., BERWICK, J., JONES, M., & Y., Z. (2001). Spectroscopic analysis of neural activity in brain: Increased oxygen consumption following activation of barrel cortex. (Erratum & Addendum). NeuroImage, 13, (3): 540-543.

MAYHEW, J. E. W., JOHNSTON, D., MARTINDALE, J., JONES, M., BERWICK, J., & ZHENG, Y. (2001). Increased oxygen consumption following activation of brain: Theoretical footnotes using spectroscopic data from barrel cortex. NeuroImage, 13.

MILNE, E., & Grafman, J. (2001). Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex Lesions in Humans Eliminate Implicit Gender Stereotyping. Journal of Neuroscience, 21, RC150(151-156). Patients with prefrontal cortex lesions and controls were administered an implicit association task (IAT) that measured the degree of association between male and female names and their stereotypical attributes of strength and weakness. They also completed three questionnaires measuring their explicit judgment regarding gender-related stereotypical attributes. There were no between-group differences on the explicit measures. On the IAT, patients with dorsolateral lesions and controls showed a strong association, whereas patients with ventromedial prefrontal cortex lesions had a significantly lower association, between the stereotypical attributes of men and women and their concepts of gender. This finding provides support for the hypothesis that patients with ventromedial prefrontal lesions have a deficit in automatically accessing certain aspects of overlearned associated social knowledge. Further details

Nadin, S. J., Waterson, P., & PARKER, S. K. (2001). Participation in job redesign: An evaluation of the use of a socio-technical tool and its impact. Human Factors and Ergonomics in Manufacturing, 11(1), 53-69.

NICOLSON, R. I., FAWCETT, A. J., & DEAN, P. (2001). "Dyslexia, development and the cerebellum - Discussion. " Trends in Neurosciences, 24, (9): 515-516.

NICOLSON, R. I., FAWCETT, A. J., & DEAN, P. (2001). Developmental dyslexia: the cerebellar deficit hypothesis. Trends in Neurosciences, 24, 508-511. Further details

NICOLSON, R. I., & MacLagan, F. (2001). Cerebellar tests may differentiate between poor readers with and without IQ discrepancy. Journal Of Learning Disabilities, 24, (2): 119-135. Further details

Oliver, P., Forrest, R., ROWSE, G., & Keen, J. (2001). Snoring prior to fatal opiate overdose: An intervention opportunity? . Addiction, 96, 652. Further details

Oliver, P., Keen, J., ROWSE, G., & Mathers, N. (2001). Deaths from drugs of abuse in Sheffield, 1998: The role of prescribed medication. British Journal of General Practice, 51, 394-396. Characteristics of recent drug abuse-related deaths in the city of Sheffield were examined from the coroner's records. Almost all of those who died of poisoning from a drug of abuse were known to be dependent on heroin yet less than half were receiving treatment. Benzodiazepines were frequently detected alongside opiates during toxicology, the source of which was likely to be the deceased's own prescription. Further details

PARKER, S. K., & AXTELL, C. M. (2001). Seeing another view point: Antecedents and outcomes of employee perspective-taking. . Academy of Management Journal, 44(6), 1085 - 1100.

PARKER, S. K., AXTELL, C. M., & Turner, N. (2001). Designing a safer workplace: Importance of job autonomy, communication quality, and supportive supervisors. . Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 6(3), 211-228.

PARKER, S. K., WALL, T., & Cordery, J. (2001). Future work design research and practice: Towards an elaborated model of work design. [Invited contribution to Future of Work Special Issue], Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, 74, 413-440.

PARKER, S. K., WALL, T., & Cordery, J. L. (2001). Future work design research and practice: Towards an elaborated model of work design. [Invited contribution to Future of Work Special Issue], . Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, 74, 413-440.

Parkin, A. J., & HUNKIN, N. M. (2001). British memory research: A journey through the 20th century. . British Journal of Psychology, 92, 37 - 52.

PARSONS, L. M. (2001). Evaluating spatial transformation procedures as universals. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 24, 697-698. Further details

PARSONS, L. M. (2001). Exploring the functional neuroanatomy of music performance, perception, and comprehension.

PARSONS, L. M. (2001). Integrating cognitive psychology, neuroimaging, and neurology. Acta Psychologica: Special Issue on Cognitive Neuroscience, 107, 155-181. Further details

PARSONS, L. M., Egan, G., Liotti, M., Brannan, S., Denton, D., Shade, R. M., et al. (2001). Neuroimaging evidence implicating cerebellum in the experience of hypercapnea and hunger for air. Proceedings of National Academy of Science USA, 98, 2041-2046. Further details

PARSONS, L. M., J, M., A, T., A, E., P, F., J, L., et al. (2001). A probabilistic atlas and reference system for the human brain. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, 356, 1293-1322. Further details

PARSONS, L. M., & Osheron, D. (2001). New evidence for distinct right and left brain systems for deductive and probabilistic reasoning. Cerebral Cortex, 11, 954-965. Further details

PASCALIS, O., Demont, E., de Haan, M., & Campbell, R. (2001). Recognition of faces of different species: a developmental study between 5 and 8 years of age. Infant and Child Development, 10, 39-45. Further details

PASCALIS, O., & M., S. (2001). Generation tasks. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 54A, 641-664.

Philp, I., Newton, P., McKee, K. J., Dixon, S., ROWSE, G., & Bath, P. A. (2001). Geriatric assessment in primary care: formulating best practice. British Journal of Community Nursing, 6, 650-655. Comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) is a structured approach to measuring physical, mental and social functioning of older people to identify needs and to plan care. Meta-analysis of trials of CGA suggest that it is cost-effective, but there is no agreed approach to its implementation in primary care. Our aim was to develop a best-practice model for geriatric assessment in primary care. We took an iterative approach to development, combining expert and local stakeholder opinion, and using semi-structured interviews to assess patient and practitioner experience in nine general practices in Sheffield. Patients were aged 75 and over, living at home. The best-practice model was the use of a standardized instrument (EASY-Care) to unselected patients aged 75 years and over living at home or in residential care, administered by a practice nurse in the context of an over-75s health check. There was high patient and practitioner acceptability, and significant cost savings were noted. Key beneficial features were the assessment of mental health and sources of support; goal-setting; generation of a disability score; and high patient satisfaction from contact with nursing staff. We conclude that geriatric assessment in primary care is feasible, economical and beneficial to patients and practitioners. Nursing staff are central to successful implementation of geriatric assessment in primary care.

Pickles, A., Rowe, R., Simonoff, E., Foley, D., Rutter, M., & Silberg, J. (2001). Child psychiatric symptoms and psychosocial impairment: Relationship and prognostic significance. British Journal of Psychiatry, 179, 230-235.

Rafferty, A. E., & Griffin, M. A. (2001). Expanding organizational diagnosis by assessing the intensity of change activities. Organization Development Journal.

Rees, A., HARDY, G. E., Barkham, M., Elliot, R., Smith, J., & Reynolds, S. (2001). "It's like catching a desire before it flies away": A comprehensive analysis of a problem clarification event in cognitive-behavioral therapy for depression. Psychotherapy Research, 11, 331-351.

Rowe, R., & McKenna, F. P. (2001). Skilled anticipation in real-world tasks: Measurement of attentional demands within the domain of tennis. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, 7(1), 60-67.

Scott, S., Barnard, P. J., & MAY, J. (2001). Specifying executive function in random generation tasks. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 54A, 641-664.

SHEERAN, P., Conner, M., & NORMAN, P. (2001). Can the theory of planned behavior explain patterns of health behavior change? Health Psychology, 20, 12-19. Further details

SIEGAL, M., Surian, L., Nemeroff, C. J., & Peterson, C. C. (2001). Lies, mistakes, and blessings: Defining and characteristic features in conceptual development. Journal Of Cognition and Culture, 1, 323-339.

SIEGAL, M., Varley, R., & Want, S. C. (2001). Mind over grammar: Reasoning in aphasia and development. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 5, 296-301.

SLADE, P., Heake, S., Fletcher, J., & Stewart, P. (2001). Termination of pregnancy: patients' perceptions of care. British Journal of Family Planning and Reproductive Health Care, 27, 72 - 77.

Smith, J. M., James, M. F., Bockhorst, K. H. J., Smith, M. I., Bradley, D. P., PAPADAKIS, N. G., et al. (2001). Investigation of feline brain anatomy for the detection of cortical spreading depression with magnetic resonance imaging. Journal of Anatomy, 198, (5): 537-554.

Smith, P. R., & SPRIGG, C. A. (2001). Advice regarding call centre working practices. Local Authority Circular, 94/1.

Spence, S., Farrow, T., Herford, A., Wilkinson, I. D., ZHENG, Y., & Woodruff, P. W. R. (2001). Behavioural and functional anatomical correlates of deception in humans. NeuroReport, 12, (13): 2433-2438.

STONE, J. V. (2001). Face Recognition: When a nod is better than a wink. Current Biology, 11, 663 664.

STONE, J. V. (2001). Blind Source Separation Using Temporal Predictability. Neural Computation, 13, (7): 1559-1574.

STONE, J. V., HUNKIN, N. M., & Hornby, A. (2001). Spontaneous recovery of memory predicted by neural network models. Nature, 114, 167-168.

STONE, J. V., HUNKIN, N. M., & Hornby, A. (2001). Predicting spontaneous recovery of memory. Nature, 414, 167 - 168.

STONE, J. V., HUNKIN, N. M., PORRILL, J., Wood, R., Keeler, V., Beanland, M., et al. (2001). When is now? Perception of simultaneity. Proceedings of the Royal Society (B), 268, 31 - 38.

Street, H., SHEERAN, P., & Orbell, S. (2001). Integrating concepts of depression: A multidimensional scaling analysis. Journal of Affective Disorders, 64, 53-64. Further details

Surian, L., & SIEGAL, M. (2001). Sources of performance on theory of mind tasks in right hemisphere damaged patients. Brain and Language, 78, 224-232.

THOMPSON, A. R., & KENT, G. (2001). Adjusting to disfigurement: Processes involved in dealing with being visibly different. Clinical Psychology Review, 21, (5): 663-682. Further details

Vance, Y. H., Morse, R., Jenney, M., & EISER, C. (2001). "Methodological issues in measuring quality of life in childhood cancer: Measures, proxies and parental mental health." Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 42, 661-667. Further details

Varley, R., & SIEGAL, M. (2001). Words, grammar, and number concepts: Evidence from development and aphasia. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 24, 1120-1121.

Varley, R., SIEGAL, M., & Want, S. C. (2001). Severe grammatical impairment does not preclude 'theory of mind'. Neurocase, 7, 489-493.

Waterman, A., BLADES, M., & SPENCER, C. P. (2001). Interviewing children and adults: The effect of question format on the tendency to speculate. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 15, 521-531.

Waterman, A., BLADES, M., & SPENCER, C. P. (2001). Is a jumper angrier than a tree? Children's responses to nonsense questions. The Psychologist, 14, 474-477.

ZHENG, Y., JOHNSTON, D., BERWICK, J., & MAYHEW, J. E. W. (2001). Signal source separation in the analysis of neural activity in brain. NeuroImage, 13, (3): 447-458.

Absolom, K., & EiSER, C. (2002). Information for survivors of childhood cancer. CONTACT, 15.

Anderson, L., Huron, D., Tramo, M., Collins, A., PARSONS, L. M., Thompson, W., et al. (2002). The Infinite Mind: Music and the Mind. Lichtenstein Creative Media.

ANDRADE, J., Kemps, E., Wernier, Y., MAY, J., & Szmalec, A. (2002). Insensitivity of visual short-term memory to irrelevant visual information. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 55(3), 753-754.

ARMITAGE, C. J., & Arden, M. A. (2002). Exploring discontinuity patterns in the transtheoretical model: An application of the theory of planned behaviour. British Journal of Health Psychology, 7, 89-103. Further details

ARMITAGE, C. J., NORMAN, P., & Conner, M. (2002). "Can the theory of planned behaviour mediate the effects of age, gender and multidimensional health locus of control?" British Journal of Health Psychology, 7, 299-316. Further details

AXTELL, C. M., WALL, T. D., Stride, C., Pepper, K., & CLEGG, C. W. (2002). Familiarity breeds content: The impact of exposure on employee openness to change and well- being. Journal of Occupational and Organisational Psychology, 75, 217-232.

Barkham, M., Rees, A., Stiles, W. B., HARDY, G. E., & Shapiro, D. A. (2002). Dose-effect relations for psychotherapy of mild depression: A quasi-experimental comparison of effects of 2, 8 and 16 sessions. Psychotherapy Research, 12, 263-274.

Berwick, J., Martin, C., Martindale, J., Jones, M., Johnston, D., Zheng, Y., et al. (2002). Hemodynamic response in the unanesthetized rat: intrinsic optical imaging and spectroscopy of the barrel cortex. Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, 22, 670-679.

BLADES, M., Lippa, Y., Golledge, R., Jacobson, R. D., & Kitchin, R. (2002). Wayfinding by people with visual impairments: the effect of spatial tasks on the ability to learn a novel route. Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness, 96, 407-419.

Brain, K., NORMAN, P., Gray, J., Rogers, C., Mansel, R., & Harper, P. (2002). A randomised trial of specialist genetic assessment: Psychological impact on women at different levels of familial breast cancer risk. British Journal of Cancer, 86, 233-238.

Buehner, M. J., & MAY, J. (2002). Knowledge mediates the timeframe of covariation assessment in human causal induction. Thinking and Reasoning, 8, 269-295. Further details

Callaghan, P., Eves, F. F., NORMAN, P., Chang, A. M., & Lung, C. Y. (2002). Applying the transtheoretical model of change to exercise in young Chinese people. British Journal of Health Psychology, 7, 267-282.

Christian, J., & ARMITAGE, C. J. (2002). Attitudes and intentions of homeless people towards service provision in South Wales. British Journal of Social Psychology, 41, 219-231. Further details

Claflin, D. I., Stanton, M. E., HERBERT, J., Greer, J., & Eckerman, C. O. (2002). Effect of delay-interval on classical eyeblink conditioning in 5-month-old human infants. Developmental Psychobiology, 41, 329-340. Further details

CLEGG, C. W., WALL, T. D., Pepper, K., Stride, C., Woods, D., Morrison, D., et al. (2002). An international study of the use and effectiveness of modern manufacturing practices. Human Factors and Ergonomics in Manufacturing, 12, 171- 191.

Conner, M., NORMAN, P., & Bell, R. (2002). The theory of planned behavior and healthy eating. Health Psychology, 21, 194-201.

Conner, M., Sparks, P., Povey, R., James, R., Shepherd, R., & ARMITAGE, C. J. (2002). Moderator effects of attitudinal ambivalence on attitude-behaviour relationships. European Journal Of Social Psychology, 32, 705-718. Further details

Cusack, R., & PAPADAKIS, N. (2002). New robust 3-D phase unwrapping algorithms: Application to magnetic field mapping and undistorting echoplanar images. NeuroImage, 16, (3): 754-764.

Davis, H., BUCKLEY, D., Jacobs, R., Brennand, D. A. A., & FRISBY, J. P. (2002). Accommodation To Large Disparity Stereograms. Journal of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus, 6, 6): 377-384. Further details

de Haan, M., PASCALIS, O., & Johnson, M. H. (2002). Specialization of neural mechanisms underlying face recognition in human infants. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience., 14, (2): 199-209. Further details

DEAN, P., PORRILL, J., & STONE, J. V. (2002). Decorrelation control by the cerebellum achieves oculomotor plant compensation in simulated vestibulo-ocular reflex. "Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, Series B", 269, "(1503), 1895-1904."

Downes, J. J., Mayes, A. R., MacDonald, C., & HUNKIN, N. M. (2002). Temporal order memory in patients with Korsakoff's syndrome and medial temporal lobe amnesia. Neuropsychologia, 40, 853.

EISER, C. (2002). Editorial. Pediatric Rehabilitation, 5, 187-189.

EISER, C., EISER, J. R., & Greco, V. (2002). Parenting a child with cancer: promotion and prevention-focused parenting. Pediatric Rehabilitation, 5, 215-221.

EISER, J. R., & Cole, N. (2002). "Participation in cervical screening as a function of perceived risk, barriers and need for cognitive closure." Journal of Health Psychology, 7, 99-105.

EISER, J. R., Coulson, N. S., & EISER, C. (2002). Adolescents' perceptions of the costs and benefits of food additives and their presence in different foods. Journal of Risk Research, 5, 167-176.

EISER, J. R., EiSER, C., Riazi, A., Hammersley, S., & Tooke, J. E. (2002). Interpretations of risk and expectations of change among individuals with Types 1 and 2 diabetes. Journal of Health Psychology, 7, 710-711.

EISER, J. R., Miles, S., & Frewer, L. J. (2002). "Trust, perceived risk and attitudes toward food technologies." Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 32, 2423-2433.

FAWCETT, A. J. (2002). "Facing learning disabilities in the adult years: Understanding dyslexia, ADHD, assessment, intervention, and research. " Contemporary Psychology, 47, 67-69.

FAWCETT, A. J., & NICOLSON, R. I. (2002). Children with dyslexia are slow to articulate a single speech gesture planning. Dyslexia: An International Journal of Research and Practice. Further details

Finch, A. J., NICOLSON, R. I., & FAWCETT, A. J. (2002). Evidence for an anatomical difference within the cerebella of dyslexic brains. Cortex, 38, 529-539.

Greaves, C. J., EISER, C., Seamark, D., Halpin, & D.M.G. (2002). Attack context: an important mediator of the relationship between psychological status and asthma outcomes. Thorax, 57, 217-221.

Griffin, M. A., Landy, F. J., & Mayocchi, L. (2002). Australian influences on Elton Mayo: The construct of revery in industrial society. History of Psychology, 5, 356-375.

Gross, J., Hayne, H., HERBERT, J., & Sowerby, P. (2002). Measuring infant memory: Does the ruler matter? Developmental Psychobiology, 40, 183-192. Further details

HARRIS, P., Sparks, P., & Raats, M. (2002). Theoretical and applied issues in the provision of absolute and comparative risk information. Risk, Decision and Policy, 7, 153-163.

Haywood, A., SLADE, P., & King, H. (2002). Post natal depression and premenstrual symptoms: an evaluation of the evidence for a relationship. invited submission to Health Psychology Update, 11, 2-5.

Haywood, A., SLADE, P., & King, H. (2002). Assessing the assessment instruments for menstrual cycle symptoms: a guide for clinicians and researchers. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 52, 223-237.

Hazel, T. R., SKLAVOS, S. G., & DEAN, P. (2002). Estimation of premotor synaptic drives to simulated abducens motoneurons for control of eye position. Experimental Brain Research, 146, (2): 184-196.

Holman, D. J., & WALL, T. D. (2002). "Work characteristics, learning-related outcomes and strain: A test of competing direct effects, mediated and moderated models." Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 7, 283-301.

HUMPHRIES, M. D., & GURNEY, K. (2002). The role of intra-thalamic and thalamocortical circuits in action selection. Network: Computation in Neural Systems, 13, 131-156.

HUNKIN, N. M., Mayes, A. R., Gregory, L. J., Nicholas, A. K., Nunn, J. A., Brammer, M. J., et al. (2002). Novelty-related activation within the medial temporal lobes. . Neuropsychologia, 40, 1456 - 1464.

IQBAL, Z. (2002). Ethical issues in the implementation of a DRI programme for the treatment of social isolation and ritualistic behaviour in a learning disabled individual. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 46, 82-93.

IQBAL, Z. (2002). Response to Reinders: Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 46, 359-360.

Johnson, R. C., & SLADE, P. (2002). Obstetric complications and anxiety in pregnancy: Is there a relationship? Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 24, 1-14.

Johnson, R. C., & SLADE, P. (2002). Does fear of labour predict caesarian section? British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 109, 1213 - 1221.

Jones, M., Berwick, J., & MAYHEW, J. E. W. (2002). "Changes in Blood Flow, Oxygenation and Volume following extended stimulation of Rodent Barrel Cortex." NeuroImage, Vol 15, "No. 3, 474-484".

Lawford, J., & EiSER, C. (2002). Exploring links between the concepts of Quality of life and resilience. Pediatric Rehabilitation, 4, 209-216.

Lawford, J., Volavka, N., & EISER, C. (2002). A generic measure of Quality of life for children aged 3-8 years: results of two preliminary studies. Pediatric rehabilitation.

Laxton-Kane, M., & SLADE, P. (2002). The role of prenatal attachment in a woman's experience of pregnancy a secured funding and supervisor nd implications for the process of care. Journal of Reproductive and Infant Psychology, 20, 253 - 266.

Lee, K. J., Barber, D. C., Paley, M. N., Wilkinson, I. D., PAPADAKIS, N. G., & P.D., G. (2002). Image-based EPI ghost correction using an algorithm based on projection onto convex sets (POCS). Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 47, (4): 812-817.

Ling, J., & BLADES, M. (2002). Further evidence for incidental encoding of colour by children and adults. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 20, 537-544.

Martin, C., Berwick, J., Johnston, D., Zheng, Y., & Martindale, J. (2002). Optical imaging spectroscopy in the unanaesthetised rat. Neuroscience Methods, 120, 25-34.

Mason, C. M., & Griffin, M. A. (2002). Group task satisfaction: examining satisfaction at the group level. Small group research, 33, 271-312.

MAY, J., M.J., B., & Duke, D. (2002). Continuity and Cognition. International Journal on Universal Access in the Information Society, 1, 252-262.

Mayes, A. R., Holdstock, J. S., Isaac, C. L., HUNKIN, N. M., & Roberts, N. (2002). Relative sparing of item recognition memory in a patient with adult-onset damage limited to the hippocampus. . Hippocampus, 12, 325 - 340.

MILNE, E., Swettenham, J., Hansen, P., Campbell, R., Jeffries, H., & Plaisted, K. (2002). High Motion Coherence Thresholds in Children with Autism. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 43, 255 - 264. Background: We assessed motion processing in a group of high functioning children with autism and a group of typically developing children, using a coherent motion detection task. Method: Twenty-five children with autism (mean age 11 years, 8 months) and 22 typically developing children matched for non-verbal mental ability and chronological age were required to detect the direction of moving dots in a random dot kinematogram. Results: The group of children with autism showed significantly higher motion coherence thresholds than the typically developing children (i.e., they showed an impaired ability to detect coherent motion). Conclusions: This finding suggests that some individuals with autism may show impairments in low-level visual processing specifically in the magnocellular visual pathway. The findings are discussed in terms of implications for higher-level cognitive theories of autism, and the suggestion is made that more work needs to be carried out to further investigate lowlevel visual processing in autism. Keywords: Autistic disorder, motion perception, central coherence, magnocellular pathway, visual processing. Further details

Milne, S., Orbell, S., & SHEERAN, P. (2002). Combining motivational and volitional interventions to promote exercise participation: Protection motivation theory and implementation intentions. British Journal of Health Psychology, 7, 163-184. Further details

Mitchinson, B., & Harrison, R. F. (2002). Digital Communications Channel Equalization Using The Kernel Adaline. IEEE Transactions on Communications, 50(4), 571-576. Further details

Neal, A., & Griffin, M. A. (2002). Safety climate and safety behaviour. . Australian Journal of Management (Special issue on major research projects in Australia).

NICKEL, P., Eilers, K., Seehase, L., & Nachreiner, F. (2002). "On the reliability, validity, sensitivity and diagnosticity of heart rate and heart rate variability indices for measuring mental work strain [in German]". Zeitschrift fŸr Arbeitswissenschaft, 56, 22-36.

NICOLSON, R. I. (2002). The Dyslexia Ecosystem. Dyslexia: An International Journal of Research and Practice, 8, 55-66. Further details

NICOLSON, R. I., Daum, I., Schugens, M. M., FAWCETT, A. J., & Schulz, A. (2002). Abnormal eyeblink conditioning for dyslexic children. Experimental Brain Research, 143, 42-50. Further details

Oates, C., BLADES, M., & Gunter, M. (2002). Young children's understanding of television advertisements. Journal of Consumer Behaviour: An International Research Review.

PAPADAKIS, N. G., Martin, K. M., Mustafa, M. H., Wilkinson, I. D., Griffiths, P. D., & Huang, C. L.-H. (2002). Woodruff P.W.R. Study of the effect of CSF suppression on white matter diffusion anisotropy mapping of healthy human brain. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 48, (2): 394-398.

Parker, S., & Griffin, M. A. (2002). What is so bad about a little name-calling? Negative consequences of gender harassment, over performance demands, and psychological distress. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 7, 195-210.

Parker, S., Griffin, M. A., SPRIGG, C. A., & WALL, T. (2002). The impact of temporary employment contracts on employee outcomes. Personnel Psychology, 55, 689-720.

PARKER, S. K., & GRIFFIN, M. A. (2002). What's so bad about a little name-calling? Negative consequences of gender harassment for over-performance demands and psychological distress. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 7(3), 192-210.

Parker, S. K., Griffin, M. A., SPRIGG, C. A., & WALL, T. D. (2002). Effect of temporary contracts on perceived work characteristics and job strain. Personnel Psychology, 55, 689-719.

PASCALIS, O., & de Haan, M. (2002). Is Face Processing Species-Specific During the First Year of Life? Science, 14, 199-209. Further details

Patel, H., BLADES, M., & ANDRADE, J. (2002). Children's incidental recall of the colours of objects and clothing. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 16, 29-47.

Patel, H., BLADES, M., & ANDRADE, J. (2002). Children's incidental recall of the colours of objects and clothing. Cognitive Development, 16(4), 965-985. Further details

Payne, N., Jones, F., & HARRIS, P. (2002). The impact of working life on health behaviour: the effect of job strain on the cognitive predictors of exercise. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 7, 342-353.

Peterson, C. C., & SIEGAL, M. (2002). Mindreading and moral awareness in popular and rejected preschoolers. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 20, 205-224.

Plester, B., Richards, J., BLADES, M., & SPENCER, C. P. (2002). Young Children's ability to use aerial photographs as maps. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 22, 29-48.

Quinn, P. C., Yahr, J., Kuhn, A., Slater, A. M., & PASCALIS, O. (2002). Representation of the Gender of Human Faces by Infants: A Preference for Female. Perception, 31, 1109-1121.

Rowe, R., Maughan, B., Pickles, A., Costello, E. J., & Angold, A. (2002). The relationship between DSM-IV oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder: Findings from the Great Smoky Mountains Study. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 43(3), 365-373.

Rowe, R., Pickles, A., Simonoff, E., Bulik, C., & Silberg, J. (2002). "Bulimic symptoms in the Virginia Twin Study of Adolescent Behavior Development: Correlates, comorbidity, and genetics." Biological Psychiatry, 51(2), 172-182.

Sauer, J., Wastell, D. G., HOCKEY, G. R. J., Crawshaw, C. M., & Downing, J. C. (2002). Designing micro-worlds of transportation systems: the computer-aided bridge operation task. Computers in Human Behaviour, 19, 169-183.

Sauer, J., Wastell, D. G., HOCKEY, G. R. J., Crawshaw, C. M., Ishak, M., & Downing, J. (2002). Effects of display design on performance in a simulated ship navigation environment. Ergonomics, 45, 329-347.

SchŸtte, M., & NICKEL, P. (2002). Multivariate analysis of the condition related reliability of strain indicators [in German]. Zeitschrift fŸr Arbeitswissenschaft, 56, 55-66.

Searle, A., NORMAN, P., Harrad, R., & Vedhara, K. (2002). Psychosocial and clinical determinants of compliance with occlusion therapy for amblyopic children. Eye, 16, 150-155.

SHEERAN, P., Trafimow, D., Finlay, K. A., & NORMAN, P. (2002). Evidence that the type of person affects the strength of the perceived behavioural control-intention relationship. British Journal of Social Psychology, 41, 253-270. Further details

SIEGAL, M., & Varley, R. (2002). Neural systems involved in 'theory of mind'. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 3, 463-471.

Smith, J. M., Smith, M. I., Bockhorst, K. H. J., PAPADAKIS, N. G., Hall, L. D., Parsons, A. A., et al. (2002). Cortical spreading depression in the feline brain following sustained and transient stimuli studied using DW-MRI. Journal of Physiology, 544, (1): 39-56.

SPENCER, C. P., & BLADES, M. (2002). Special Double Issue on Children and Environmental Psychology. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 22(1-2), 1-210.

Spinetta, J. J., Masera, G., Eden, T., Oppenheim, D., Martins, A. G., van Dongen-Melman, J., et al. (2002). "Refusal, non-compliance and abandonment of treatment in children and adolescents with cancer. A report of the SIOP Working Committee on Psychosocial issues in pediatric oncology." Medical and Pediatric Oncology, 38, 114-117.

Spinetta, J. J., Masera, G., Eden, T., Oppenheim, D., Martins, A. G., van Dongen-Melman, J., et al. (2002). "Refusal,non-compliance and abadndonment of treatment in children and adolescents with cancer." Medical Pediatric Oncology, 38, 114-117.

Stiles, W. B., Agnew-Davies, R., Barkham, M., Culverwell, A., Goldfried, M. R., Halstead, J., et al. (2002). Convergent Validity of the Agnew Relationship Measure and the Working Alliance Inventory. Psychological Assessment, 14, 209-220. Further details

STONE, J. V. (2002). Independent Component Analysis: An Introduction. Trends in Cognitive Science, 6, (2): 59-64.

STONE, J. V., PORRILL, J., PORTER, N. R., & Wilkinson, I. D. (2002). Spatiotemporal Independent Component Analysis of Event-Related fMRI Data Using Skewed Probability Density Functions. NeuroImage, 15, (2): 407-421.

THOMPSON, A. R., & BEAIL, N. (2002). The Treatment of auto-erotic asphyxiation in a man with severe intellectual disabilities; the effectiveness of a behavioural and educational programme. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 15, 36-47.

THOMPSON, A. R., KENT, G., & Smith, J. A. (2002). Living with vitiligo: Dealing with difference. . British Journal of Health Psychology, 7, 213-225.

Tillman, V., Darlington, A. S., EISER, C., Bishop, N. J., & Davies, H. A. (2002). Male sex and low physical activity are associated with reduced spine bone mineral density in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Journal of Bone Mineral Research, 17, 1073-1080.

TOTTERDELL, P., LEACH, D., BIRDI, K., CLEGG, C., & WALL, T. (2002). An investigation of the contents and consequences of major organizational innovations. International Journal of Innovation Management, 6, 343-368. Further details

Trafimow, D., Brown, J., Grace, K., Thompson, L., & SHEERAN, P. (2002). The relative influence of attitudes and subjective norms from childhood to adolescence: Between-participant and within-participant analyses. American Journal of Psychology, 115, 395-414. Further details

Trafimow, D., SHEERAN, P., Conner, M., & Finlay, K. A. (2002). Evidence that perceived behavioral control is a multidimensional construct: Perceived control and perceived difficulty. British Journal of Social Psychology, 41, 101-122. Further details

Vance, Y., & EISER, C. (2002). The child with cancer in school. "Child: Care, Health and Development".

Vance, Y. H., & EiSER, C. (2002). The school experience of the child with cancer. Medical and Pediatric Oncology, 28, pp 5-19.

WALL, T. D., Cordery, J. L., & CLEGG, C. W. (2002). "Empowerment, performance and operational uncertainty: A theoretical integration. " Applied Psychology: An International Review, 51, 146-169.

WALL, T. D., & WOOD, S. J. (2002). Delegation's a powerful tool. Professional Manager, 11, 37.

WHITE, M. P., Riazi, A., EISER, C., Hammersley, S., EISER, J. R., MacLeod, K., et al. (2002). Interpreting the risks of diabetic renal disease: Perceptions of those most at risk. Psychology and Health, 17, 33-50.

WOOD, S. J., & WALL, T. D. (2002). Gesto de recursos humanos e desempenho empresarial. Revista de Administrao de Universitdada de So, 37, (3)67-78.

Woolfe, T., Want, S. C., & SIEGAL, M. (2002). Signposts to development: Theory of mind in deaf children. Child Development, 73, 768-778.

ZHENG, Y., Martindale, J., Johnston, D., Jones, M., Berwick, J., & MAYHEW, J. E. W. (2002). A model of the Hemodynamic Response and Oxygen Delivery to Brain. NeuroImage, Vol 16, "No 3, 617-637".

Abraham, C., & SHEERAN, P. (2003). Acting on intentions: The role of anticipated regret. British Journal of Social Psychology, 42, 495-511. Further details

ARMITAGE, C. J. (2003). The relationship between multidimensional health locus of control and perceived behavioural control: How are distal perceptions of control related to proximal perceptions of control? Psychology and Health, 18, 723-738. Further details

ARMITAGE, C. J. (2003). Beyond attitudinal ambivalence: Effects of belief homogeneity on attitude-intention-behaviour relations. European Journal Of Social Psychology, 33, 551-563. Further details

ARMITAGE, C. J., & Christian, J. (2003). Special issue: On the theory of planned behaviour. Current Psychology, 22, (3): 187-280.

ARMITAGE, C. J., & Christian, J. (2003). From attitudes to behaviour: Basic and applied research on the theory of planned behaviour. Current Psychology, 22, 187-195. Further details

ARMITAGE, C. J., Povey, R., & Arden, M. A. (2003). Evidence for discontinuity patterns across the stages of change: A role for attitudinal ambivalence. Psychology and Health, 18, 373-386. Further details

AXTELL, C. M., & PARKER, S. K. (2003). Promoting role breadth self-efficacy through involvement, work redesign and training. Human Relations, 56(1), 113-125.

Barker, I., Deeprose, C., & ANDRADE, J. (2003). Awareness and Paediatric Anaesthesia: Response to editorial by Davidson. Paediatric Anaesthesia, 13(7).

BARKER, L., DEEPROSE, C., & ANDRADE, J. (2003). Response to editorial by Davidson. Paediatric Anaesthesia, 13, (7): 644-644.

BIRDI, K., Denver, D., Munir, K., Neely, A., & Prabhu, J. (2003). Post Porter: Where does the UK go from here? Report from the AIM Management Research Forum. London: AIM.

BIRDI, K., & WALL, T. D. (2003). Developing and Innovation Culture: implications from research. Report to Department of Trade and Industry/Treasury Innovation Review.

Blaut, J. M., Stea, D., SPENCER, C., & BLADES, M. (2003). Mapping as a cultural and cognitive universal. Annals of the Association of American Geographers, 93, 1): 165-185.

Bower, J. M., & PARSONS, L. M. (2003). Rethinking the lesser brain. Scientific American, 289, 50-57. Further details

Bradshaw, Z., & SLADE, P. (2003). The impact of termination of pregnancy on emotions and relationships. Clinical Psychology Review, 23, 929 - 958.

BUCKLEY, D., & FRISBY, J. P. (2003). A robust and optimal model of cue integration. Perception, 32, 14-14.

Buehner, M. J., & MAY, J. (2003). "Rethinking Temporal Contiguity and the Judgment of Causality: Effects of Prior Knowledge, Experience, and Reinforcement Procedure." Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 56A, 865-890. Further details

Cahill, J., Barkham, M., HARDY, G. E., Rees, A., & Shapiro, D. A. (2003). Outcomes of patients completing and not completing cognitive therapy for depression. . British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 42, 133-143. Further details

Christian, J., ARMITAGE, C. J., & Abrams, D. (2003). Predicting uptake of housing services: The role of self-categorisation in the theory of planned behaviour. Current Psychology, 22, 206-217. Further details

COIZET, V., Comoli, E., Westby, G. W. M., & REDGRAVE, P. (2003). Phasic activation of substantia nigra and the ventral tegmental area by chemical stimulation of the superior colliculus: an electrophysiological investigation in the rat. European Journal of Neuroscience, 17, (1): 28-40.

Comoli, E., COIZET, V., Boyes, J., Bolam, J. P., Canteras, N. S., Quirk, R. H., et al. (2003). A direct projection from superior colliculus to substantia nigra for detecting salient visual events. Nature Neuroscience, 6, 974 - 980. Further details

Comoli, E., COIZET, V., Boyes, J., Bolam, J. P., Canteras, N. S., QUIRK, R. H., et al. (2003). A direct projection from superior colliculus to substantia nigra for detecting salient visual events. Nature Neurosci, 6, 974-980.

Crowe, S. J., & PRESCOTT, T. J. (2003). Continuity and change in the development of category structure: Insights from the semantic fluency task. International Journal of Behavioural Development, 27. Further details

DAVIES, J., & Gordon, N. (2003). Staff Training and Experiences Study. Research report commissioned by the East Midlands Workforce Confederation.

DAVIES, J., & Tennant, A. (2003). DSPD: Integrating training, teamwork and supervision. . Issues in Forensic Psychology, 4, 84-96.

DEAN, P., PORRILL, J., & STONE, J. V. (2003). Visual awareness and the cerebellum: possible role of decorrelation control. In Roots of Visual Awareness, 144, 61-75.

Dimitrov, M., Nakic, M., Elpern-Waxman, J., Granetz, J., O'Grady, J., & Phipps, M. (2003). Inhibitory attentional control in patients with frontal lobe damage. Brain and Cognition, 52, 258-270.

EISER, C. (2003). What can we learn from other illnesses? Journal of Cystic Fibrosis, 2, 58-60.

EISER, C., EISER, J. R., & Greco, V. (2003). Parenting a child with cancer: promotion and prevention-focused parenting. Pediatric Rehabilitation, 5, 215-221.

EISER, C., EISER, J. R., & Greco, V. (2003). Surviving childhood cancer: Quality of life and parental regulatory focus. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.

EISER, C., Greco, V., Vance, Y. H., Horne, B., & Glaser, A. (2003). Perceived discrepancies and their resolution: Quality of life in survivors of childhood cancer. Psychology and Health.

EISER, C., Vance, Y. H., Horne, B., Glaser, A., & Galvin, H. (2003). The value of the PedsQLTM in assessing quality of life in survivors of childhood cancer. "Child: Care, Health and Development", 29, 95-102.

Eiser, J. R., Fazio, R. H., Stafford, T., & Prescott, T. J. (2003). Connectionist simulation of attitude learning: Asymmetries in the acquisition of positive and negative evaluations. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 29(10), 1221-1235.

Elliott, M. A., ARMITAGE, C. J., & Baughan, C. J. (2003). Drivers' compliance with speed limits: An application of the theory of planned behavior. Journal of Applied Psychology, 88, 964-972. Further details

Escott, D., Spiby, H., SLADE, P., & Fraser, R. B. (2003). The range of coping strategies women use to manage pain and anxiety prior to and during first experience of labour. Midwifery, 144-156.

Evans, D., & NORMAN, P. (2003). Predicting adolescent pedestrians' road-crossing intentions: an application and extension of the Theory of Planned Behaviour. Health Education Research, 18, (3): 267-277.

FAWCETT, A. J. (2003). Dyslexia and literacy: Theory and practice. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 21, 2 619-620.

FAWCETT, A. J. (2003). The International Adult Literacy Survey in Britain: Impact on policy and practice. Dyslexia, 9, (2): 99-121.

FAWCETT, A. J., & NICOLSON, R. I. (2003). Children with dyslexia are slow to articulate a single speech gesture. Dyslexia, 8, (4) :189-203.

FRISBY, J. P., Davis, H., & Edgar, R. (2003). Does interpupillary distance predict stereoacuity for normal observers? Perception, 32, 73-74.

Gerhatz, E. W., EiSER, C., & Woodhouse, C. R. J. (2003). Current approaches to assessing the quality of life in children and adolescents. British Journal of Urology, 91(2), 150-154.

Girard, B., Cuzin, V., Guillot, A., Gurney, K., & Prescott, T. J. (2003). Comparison of a "winner-takes-all" and a vertebrate inspired model of action selection embedded in a Lego Mindstorms robot. Journal of Integrative Neuroscience, 2, 179-200. Further details

Greaves, C. J., Brown, P., Terry, R. T., EISER, C., Lings, P., & Stead, J. W. (2003). Converting to insulin in primary care: an exploration of the needs of practice nurses. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 42, (5): 487-496.

GRECO, V., & Roger, D. (2003). "Uncertainty, stress, and health." Personality and Individual Differences, 34, (6): 1057-1068.

Greenfield, D., Absolom, K., Davies, H., Ross, R., & EISER, C. (2003). Childhood cancer survivors: Transition from pediatric to adult care. Current Medical Literature - GH and Growth Factors, 18, 83-91. Childhood cancer survivors experience a wide range of late-effects. As survival rates improve, follow-up in paediatric clinics becomes less feasible, and alternative models of care have been proposed. In this study, satisfaction among those attending a traditional paediatric late-effects clinic was compared with a multi-disciplinary clinic in an adult setting. Survivors (adult clinic n = 93, paediatric clinic n = 105, age 16–39 years) completed measures of symptoms, understanding of vulnerability to late-effects, purpose of follow-up, satisfaction and number of topics discussed. Predictors of satisfaction were: number of topics discussed, greater understanding of the purpose of follow-up and sex. Females, and those reporting longer waiting time were less satisfied. Aspects of clinic organisation, including shorter waiting times and opportunities to discuss health concerns, are more important in determining patient satisfaction than clinic type. Survivors’ understanding of the purpose of follow-up is also integral in determining satisfaction. Further details

HARDY, G. E., Woods, D., & WALL, T. D. (2003). The impact of psychological distress on absence from work. Journal of Applied Psychology, 88, 306-314. Further details

Harrison, L. K., & TURPIN, G. (2003). PredImplicit memory bias and trait anxiety: a psychophysiological analysis. Biological Psychology, 62, (2): 97-114.

Hayne, H., Barr, R., & HERBERT, J. (2003). The effect of prior practice on memory reactivation and generalization. Child Development, 74, 1615-1627. Further details

Hayne, H., HERBERT, J., & Simcock, G. (2003). Imitation from television by 24- and 30-month olds. Developmental Science, 6, 254-261. Further details

Heery, E., & WOOD, S. (2003). PreEmployment relations and corporate governance. British Journal of Industrial Relations, 41, (3): 477-479.

HERBERT, J., Eckerman, C. O., & Stanton, M. E. (2003). "The ontogeny of human learning in delay, long-delay, and trace eyeblink conditioning." Behavioral Neuroscience, 117, (6): 1196-1210. Further details

Hobbis, I. C. A., TURPIN, G., & Read, N. W. (2003). Abnormal illness behaviour and locus of control in patients with functional bowel disorders. British Journal of Health Psychology, 8, 393-408.

HOCKEY, G. R. J., Healey, A., Crawshaw, C. M., Wastell, D. G., & Sauer, J. (2003). Cognitive demands of collision avoidance in simulated ship control. Human Factors, 45, 252-265.

Holman, D. J., WALL, T. D., CLEGG, C. W., Sparrow, P. R., & Howard, A. (2003). The New Workplace: A Guide to the Human Impact of Modern Working Practices. London: Wiley.

Holt, R., & SLADE, P. (2003). Living without a vagina and womb: women's experiences of vaginal agensis. Psychology Health and Medicine, 8, 19 - 33.

HUMPHRIES, M. D., PRESCOTT, T. J., & GURNEY, K. (2003). The interaction of recurrent axon collateral networks in the basal ganglia. Artificial Neural Networds and Neural Information Processing - ICAN/ICONIP. Further details

Johnson, P., MAY, J., & Johnson, H. (2003). Introduction to Multiple and Collaborative Tasks. ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 10(4), 277-280.

Johnson, R. C., & SLADE, P. (2003). Obstetric complications and anxiety during pregnancy: is there a relationship? Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynecology, 24, (1): 1-14.

Keegan, D. J., Kenna, P., HUMPHRIES, M. M., Humphries, P., Flitcroft, D. I., & Coffey, P. J. (2003). PrTransplantation of syngeneic Schwann cells to the retina of the rhodopsin knockout (Rho(-/-)) mouse. Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, 44, (8): 3526-3532.

Keen, J., Oliver, P., ROWSE, G., & al., e. (2003). Does methadone maintenance treatment based on the new national guide lines work in a primary care setting? British Journal of General Practice, 53(491), 461-467. BACKGROUND: General practitioners (GPs) are being encouraged to treat more drug users but there are few studies to demonstrate the effectiveness of primary care treatment. AIM: To determine whether patients retained on methadone maintenance treatment for one year in a modern British primary care setting, with prescribing protocols based on the new national guidelines, can achieve similar harm reduction outcomes to those demonstrated in other settings, using objective outcome measures where available. DESIGN OF STUDY: Longitudinal cohort study. SETTING: The Primary Care Clinic for Drug Dependence, Sheffield. METHOD: The intervention consisted of a methadone maintenance treatment provided by GPs with prescribing protocols based on the 1999 national guidelines. The first 96 eligible consenting patients entering treatment were recruited; 65 completed the study. Outcome measures were current drug use, HIV risk-taking behaviour, social functioning, criminal activity, and mental and physical health, supplemented by urinalysis and criminal record data. RESULTS: Frequency of heroin use was reduced from a mean of 3.02 episodes per day (standard deviation [SD] = 1.73) to a mean of 0.22 episodes per day (SD = 0.54), (chi 2 = 79.48, degrees of freedom [df] = 2, P < 0.001), confirmed by urinalysis. Mean numbers of convictions and cautions were reduced by 62% (z = 3.378, P < 0.001) for all crime. HIV risk-taking behaviour, social functioning, and physical and psychological wellbeing all showed significant improvements. CONCLUSION: Patients retained on methadone maintenance treatment for one year in a primary care setting can achieve improvements on a range of harm reduction outcomes similar to those shown by studies in other, often more highly structured programmes. Further details

LEACH, D. J., WALL, T. D., & Jackson, P. R. (2003). The effect of empowerment on job knowledge: An empirical test involving operators of complex technology. Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, 76, 27- 52.

Ludlam, S., WOOD, S., Heery, E., & Taylor, A. (2003). Politics and employment relations. British Journal of Industrial Relations, 41, (4): 609-616.

MARTINDALE, J., MAYHEW, J. E. W., BERWICK, J., JONES, M., MARTIN, C., & JOHNSTON, D. (2003). The hemodynamic impulse response to a single neural event. Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, 23, (5): 5546-5555.

Mason, C. M., & Griffin, M. A. (2003). Group absenteeism and positive affective tone: A longitudinal study. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 24(667-687).

Mason, C. M., & Griffin, M. A. (2003). Identifying group task satisfaction at work. Small group research, 34, 413-442.

Maughan, B., Rowe, R., & Loeber, R. (2003). The relationship between depressed mood and poor reading skills in the Pittsburgh Youth Study. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 31(2), 219-229.

MAY, J., Barnard, P. J., & Dean, M. (2003). Using film cutting in interface design. Human-Computer Interaction, 18, 325-372.

MAY, J., Dean, M. P., & Barnard, P. J. (2003). Using film cutting techniques in interface design. Human-Computer Interaction, 18, (4): 325-372.

Mayes, A. R., ISAAC, C. L., Holdstock, J. S., Cariga, P., Gummer, A., & Roberts, N. (2003). Long-term amnesia: A review and detailed illustrative case study. Cortex, 39, 567-603.

MAYHEW, J. E. W. (2003). A measured look at neuronal oxygen consumption. Science, 299, (5609): 1023-1024.

McCourt, J., & WARR, P. (2003). In love with work. Psychologist, 16, (1): -29.

Mitchinson, B., & Harrison, R. F. (2003). Adaptive kernel-based equalization for non-stationary digital communications channels. International Journal of Systems Science, 34(1), 693-703. Further details

Moores, E., NICOLSON, R., & FAWCETT, A. J. (2003). PreAttention deficits in dyslexia: Evidence for an automatisation deficit? HealEuropean Journal of Cognitive Psychology, 15, (3): 321-348.

Moores, E., NICOLSON, R. I., & FAWCETT, A. J. (2003). Attention deficits in dyslexia: Evidence for an automatisation deficit. European Journal of Cognitive Psychology, 15, (3): 321-348.

Morrison, D., Payne, R. L., & WALL, T. D. (2003). Is job a viable unit of analysis? A multi-level analysis of demands- controls-supports models. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 8, 209-219.

NICKEL, P., & Nachreiner, F. (2003). Sensitivity and Diagnosticity of the 0.1 Hz component of Heart Rate Variability as an Indicator of Mental Workload. Human Factors, 45, 575-590.

NICKEL, P., Nachreiner, F., & Yanagibori, R. (2003). The 0.1 Hz component of HRV as an indicator of mental workload: Sensitivity and intensity for time on task effects. Journal of Psychophysiology, 17, 94.

NICOLSON, R. I., & Reynolds, D. (2003). Science, sense and synergy: Response to commentators. Dyslexia, 9, (3): 167-176. Further details

NICOLSON, R. I., & Reynolds, D. (2003). Sound findings and appropriate statistics: Response to Snowling and Hulme. Dyslexia, 9, (2): 134-135.

Nobes, G., Moore, D., Martin, A., Clifford, B., Butterworth, G., Panagiotaki, G., et al. (2003). Children's understanding of the earth in a multicultural community: Mental models or fragments of knowledge? Developmental Science, 6, 74-87.

Nolan, P., & WOOD, S. (2003). Mapping the future of work. British Journal of Industrial Relations, 41, (2): 165-174.

NORMAN, P., Searle, A., Harrad, R., & Vedhara, K. (2003). Predicting adherence to eye patching in children with amblyopia: An application of protection motivation theory. British Journal of Health Psychology, 8, 67-82.

NORMAN, P., SHEERAN, P., & Orbell, S. (2003). Does state versus action orientation moderate intention-behaviour relations? Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 33, 536-553. Further details

O'Connor, R. C., & ARMITAGE, C. J. (2003). Theory of planned behaviour and parasuicide: An exploratory study. Current Psychology, 22, 196-205. Further details

Oates, C., BLADES, M., & Gunter, B. (2003). Special Issue on Children & marketing. Journal of Marketing Management, 19(4), 401-512.

Oates, C., BLADES, M., Gunter, B., & Don, J. (2003). Children's understanding of television advertising: a qualitative approach. Journal of Marketing Communications, 9, 59-72.

Overy, K., NICOLSON, R. I., FAWCETT, A. J., & Clarke, E. F. (2003). Dyslexia and music: Measuring musical timing skills. Dyslexia, 9, (1): 18-36. Further details

PAPADAKIS, N. G., Martin, K. M., Wilkinson, I. D., & Huang, C.-H. (2003). Analysis of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging data using principal component analysis. Physics in Medicine and Biology, 48, (24): N343-N350.

PAPADAKIS, N. G., Martin, K. M., Wilkinson, I. D., & Huang, C.-H. (2003). A Measure of curve fitting error for noise filtering diffusion tensor MRI Data. Journal of Magnetic Resonance, 164, (1): 1-9.

PARKER, S. K. (2003). Longitudinal effects of lean production on employee outcomes and the mediating role of work characteristics. Journal of Applied Psychology, 88, 620-634.

PARSONS, L. M. (2003). Superior Parietal Cortices and Varieties of Mental Rotation. Trends in Cognitive Science, 17, 515-517. Further details

PARSONS, L. M. (2003). Music of the spheres. BBC Music Magazine, (November), 34 - 39.

Payne, S., & SPENCER, C. P. (2003). Sheffield's Skateboarders move to the vest-pocket park: How planning can resolve conflicts between users of valued urban spaces. Sheffield Online Papers in Social Research (ShOP) Special issue: SKATEBOARDING, 7.

Pegg, E. J., Gurney, K., Parks, R. W., & Prescott, A. J. (2003). Reliability and Validity of a Paced Computer Stroop Task for fMRI Reliability and validity of a paced computer Stroop task for fMRI. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 18, 755. Further details

Plester, B., BLADES, M., & SPENCER, C. P. (2003). Children's understanding of aerial photographs. Children's Geographies, 1, 281-293.

Plester, B., Richards, J., Shevelan, C., BLADES, M., & SPENCER, C. P. (2003). Hunt from above. Primary Geographer, 51, 20-21.

Reynolds, D. R., NICOLSON, R. I., & Hambly, H. (2003). Evaluation of an exercise-based treatment for children with reading difficulties. Dyslexia, 9, (1): 48-71. Further details

Rivis, A., & SHEERAN, P. (2003). Social influences and the theory of planned behaviour: Evidence for a direct relationship between prototypes and young people's exercise behaviour. Psychology & Health, 18, (5): 567-583.

Rozin, P., & SIEGAL, M. (2003). Vegemite as a cultural marker. Gastronomica: The Journal of Food and Culture.

Sauer, J., Wastell, D. G., HOCKEY, G. R. J., & Earle, F. (2003). Performance in a complex multiple-task environment during a lab-based simulation of occasional night work. Human Factors, 45, 657-669.

Shah, J., Paul, I., BUCKLEY, D., Davis, H., FRISBY, J. P., & Darzi, A. (2003). Reaction time does not predict surgical skill. British Journal of Surgery, 90, (10): 1285-1286.

Shah, J., Paul, I., BUCKLEY, D., Davis, H., FRISBY, J. P., & Darzi, A. (2003). Can tonic accommodation predict surgical performance? Surgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques, 17, (5): 787-790. Further details

Shapiro, D. A., Barkham, M., Stiles, W. B., HARDY, G. E., Rees, A., & Reynolds, S. (2003). Time is of the essence: A selectiove review of the fall and rise of brief therapy research. Psychology and Psychotherapy-Theory Research and Practice, 76, 211-235.

Shapiro, D. A., Barkham, M., Stiles, W. B., HARDY, G. E., Rees, A., Reynolds, S., et al. (2003). Time is of the essence: A selective review of the fall and rise of brief therapies research. Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice, 76, 211-235. Further details

SHEERAN, P., & Abraham, C. (2003). Mediator of moderators: Temporal stability of intention and the intention-behavior relationship. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 29, 205-215. Further details

SHEERAN, P., & Silverman, M. (2003). Evaluation of three interventions to promote workplace health and safety: Evidence for the utility of implementation intentions. Social Science and Medicine, 56, 2153-2163. Further details

SHEERAN, P., Trafimow, D., & ARMITAGE, C. J. (2003). Predicting behaviour from perceived behavioural control: Tests of the accuracy assumption of the theory of planned behaviour. British Journal of Social Psychology, 42, 393-410. Further details

Sheppard, L., EISER, C., & Kingston, J. (2003). Retinoblastoma: Preliminary results from a cross sectional follow-up of survivors. Psycho-Oncology, 12, (8): 839-839.

SIEGAL, M., & BLADES, M. (2003). Language and auditory processing in autism. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 7(9), 378-380.

Skirton, H., & EISER, C. (2003). Discovering and addressing client's lay construct of genetic disease: An important aspect of genetic health care? Research and Theory for Nursing Practice, 17, 339-352.

Smith-Spark, J. H., Fisk, J. E., FAWCETT, A. J., & NICOLSON, R. I. (2003). Investigating the central executive in adult dyslexics: Evidence from phonological and visuospatial working memory performance. European Journal of Cognitive Psychology, 15, (4): 567-587. Further details

Sparks, P., HARRIS, P. R., & Raats, M. (2003). Imagining and explaining hypothetical scenarios: Mediational effects on the subjective likelihood of health-related outcomes. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 33, 869-887.

SPENCER, C. (2003). Why has the geography curriculum been so little attuned to the child's geographical enquiry? Geography, 88, 232-233.

Spiby, H., SLADE, P., Escott, D., & Fraser, R. B. (2003). Selecting coping strategies in labour: an investigation of women's experience. Birth, 30, 189 - 194.

Spiby, H., SLADE, P., Escott, D., Henderson, B., & Fraser, R. B. (2003). Selected coping strategies in labor: An investigation of women's experiences. Birth-Issues in Perinatal Care, 30, (3): 189-194.

SPRIGG, C. A., Smith, P. R., & Jackson, P. R. (2003). Psychosocial risk factors in call centres: An evaluation of work design and well-being. HSE Research Report (RR 169).

Stiles, W. B., Leach, C., Barkham, M., HARDY, G. E., Lucock, M., Shapiro, D. A., et al. (2003). Early Sudden Gains in Psychotherapy Under Routine Clinic Conditions: Practice-Based Evidence. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 71, 14-21. Further details

Sweetenham, J., Condie, S., Campbell, R., MILNE, E., & Coleman, M. (2003). Does the perception of moving eyes trigger reflexive visual orienting in autism? "Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, Series B", 358, 325 - 334. Does movement of the eyes in one or another direction function as an automatic attentional cue to a location of interest? Two experiments explored the directional movement of the eyes in a full face for speed of detection of an aftercoming location target in young people with autism and in control participants. Our aim was to investigate whether a low-level perceptual impairment underlies the delay in gaze following characteristic of autism. The participants' task was to detect a target appearing on the left or right of the screen either 100 ms or 800 ms after a face cue appeared with eyes averting to the left or right. Despite instructions to ignore eye-movement in the face cue, people with autism and control adolescents were quicker to detect targets that had been preceded by an eye movement cue congruent with target location compared with targets preceded by an incongruent eye movement cue. The attention shifts are thought to be reflexive because the cue was to be ignored, and because the effect was found even when cue-target duration was short (100 ms). Because (experiment two) the effect persisted even when the face was inverted, it would seem that the direction of movement of eyes can provide a powerful (involuntary) cue to a location. Further details

Want, S. C., PASCALIS, O., Coleman, M., & BLADES, M. (2003). Recognizing people from the inner or outer parts of their faces: Developmental data concerning 'unfamiliar' faces. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 21, 125-135.

Webb, T. L., & SHEERAN, P. (2003). Can implementation intentions help to overcome ego-depletion? Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 39, 279-286. Further details

White, M. P., EISER, J. R., & HARRIS, P. (2003). Risk perceptions of mobile phone use while driving. Risk Analysis, 24, 323-334. Further details

Wong, P. C. M., PARSONS, L. M., Diehl, R. L., & Martinez, M. J. (2003). The effect of functional context on pitch perception. Journal of Neuroscience, 24, 9153-9160. Further details

WOOD, S. J., de Menezes, L. M., & Haye, A. (2003). Family-friendly management in Great Britain: Testing various perspectives. Industrial Relations, 42, (2): 221-250.

Woolfe, T., WANT, S. C., & SIEGAL, M. (2003). Siblings and theory of mind in deaf native signing children. Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, 8, 340-347.

WRIGHT, I., Waterman, M., Prescott, H., & Murdoch-Eaton, D. (2003). A new Stroop-like measure of inhibitory function development: typical developmental trends. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, 44, (4): 561-575.

Abraham, C., & SHEERAN, P. (2004). Deciding to exercise: The role of anticipated regret. British Journal Health Psychology, 9, 269-278. Further details

Abraham, C., & SHEERAN, P. (2004). Implications of goal theories for the theories of reasoned action and planned behaviour. Current Psychology, 22, 218-233. Further details

Absolom, K., EiSER, C., Greco, V., & Davies, H. (2004). Health promotion for survivors of childhood cancer: a minimal intervention. Patient Education & Counselling, 55, 379-384.

ARMITAGE, C. J. (2004). Evidence that implementation intentions reduce dietary fat intake: A randomized trial. Health Psychology, 23, 319-323. Further details

ARMITAGE, C. J., & DEEPROSE, C. (2004). Changing student evaluations by means of the numeric values of rating scales. Psychology Learning and Teaching, 3, 122-125. Further details

ARMITAGE, C. J., SHEERAN, P., Conner, M., & Arden, M. A. (2004). Stages of change or changes of stage? Predicting transitions in transtheoretical model stages in relation to healthy food choice. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 72, 491-499. Further details

Bailham, D., SLADE, P., & Joseph, S. (2004). Principal components analysis of the Perceptions of Labour and Delivery Scale and revised scoring criteria. Journal Reproductive and Infant Psychology, 22, 157 - 165.

BARKER, L. A., ANDRADE, J., & Romanowski, C. A. J. (2004). Impaired implicit cognition with intact executive function after extensive bilateral prefrontal pathology: a case study. Neurocase, 10(3), 233-248. Further details

Barnard, P., Scott, S., Taylor, J., MAY, J., & Knighteley, W. (2004). Paying attention to meaning. Psychological Science, 15, 179-186.

Beart, S., HARDY, G. E., & Buchan, L. (2004). Changing selves: A grounded theory of belonging to a self advocacy group for people with learning disabilities. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 17, 91-100.

Berwick, J., Redgrave, P., Jones, M., Martindale, J., Hewson-Stoate, N., Johnston, D., et al. (2004). Integration of neural responses originating from different regions of the cortical somatosensory map. Brain Research, Vol 1030, "No 2, 284 - 293".

BLADES, M., SPENCER, C. P., Desmond, K., & Sowden, S. (2004). Toy Town. Primary Geographer, 53.

Brown, S., Martinez, M. J., Hodges, D. A., Fox, P. T., & PARSONS, L. M. (2004). The song system of the human brain. Cognitive Brain Research, 20, 363 - 375. Further details

Brown, S., Martinez, M. J., & PARSONS, L. M. (2004). Activation of limbic cortical areas during passive listening to music. NeuroReport, 15, 2033 - 2037. Further details

Buehner, M. J., & MAY, J. (2004). Abolishing the effect of reinforcement delay on human causal learning. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 57B (2), 179-191.

Bywaters, M., ANDRADE, J., & TURPIN, G. (2004). Intrusive and non-intrusive memories in a non-clinical sample: The effects of mood and affect on imagery vividness. Memory, 12(4), 467-478.

Bywaters, M., ANDRADE, J., & TURPIN, G. (2004). The contribution of affective stimulus variables and individual differences to vividness of visual imagery. Memory.

Bywaters, M., ANDRADE, J., & TURPIN, G. (2004). "Determinants of the vividness of visual imagery: The effects of delayed recall, stimulus affect and individual differences". Memory, 12(4), 479-488.

Clarke, H., Rees, A., & HARDY, G. E. (2004). The big idea: Clients views of cognitive therapy. Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice, 51, 81-92. Further details

Clarke, S. A., & EiSER, C. (2004). The measurement of health related quality of life (QOL) in paediatric clinical trials: a systematic review. Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, pp 2-66. Further details

Cooke, R., & SHEERAN, P. (2004). Moderation of cognition-intention and cognition-behaviour relations: A meta-analysis of properties of variables from the theory of planned behaviour. British Journal of Social Psychology, 43, 159-186. Further details

DAVIES, J. (2004). Division of Forensic Psychology Membership Survey. Survey and report commissioned by the Division of Forensic Psychology: British Psychological Society.

DAVIES, J., Tennant, A., Ferguson, E., Talkes, K. J., & Jones, L. (2004). Developing models and a framework for multi-professional clinical supervision. British Journal of Forensic Practice, 6(3), 36-42.

DEEPROSE, C., ANDRADE, J., Varma, S., & Edwards, N. (2004). Unconscious learning during surgery with propofol anaesthesia. British Journal of Anaesthesia, 92, 171-177.

Deeprose, C., & C.J., A. (2004). Giving formative feedback in Higher Education. Psychology Learning and Teaching, 4, 43-46. Further details

Devonshire, I. M., BERWICK, J., JONES, M., MARTINDALE, J., JOHNSTON, D., OVERTON, P. G., et al. (2004). Haemodynamic responses to sensory stimulation are enhanced following acute cocaine administration. NeuroImage, 22, 1744 - 1753.

Devonshire, I. M., BERWICK, J., JONES, M., Martindale, J., JOHNSTON, D., Overton, P. G., et al. (2004). Haemodynamic responses to sensory stimulation are enhanced following acute cocaine administration. Neuroimage, 22, 1744-1753.

Dufour, V., Coleman, M., Campbell, R., Petit, O., & PASCALIS, O. (2004). On the species-specificity of face recognition in human adults. Current Psychology of Cognition, 22(3), 315-333.

EISER, C. (2004). Use of QOL measures in clinical trials. Ambulatory Pediatrics, 4, 395-399.

EISER, C. (2004). Neurocognitive sequelae of childhood cancers and their treatment. A comment on the article by Mulhern and Butler. Pediatric Rehabilitation, 7, 15-16.

EISER, C., EISER, J. R., & Greco, V. (2004). Surviving childhood cancer: Quality of life and parental regulatory focus. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 30, 123-133. Further details

EISER, C., Greco, V., Vance, Y. H., Horne, B., & Glaser, A. (2004). Perceived discrepancies and their resolution: Quality of life in survivors of childhood cancer. Psychology and Health, 19, 15-28.

Escott, D., Spiby, H., SLADE, P., & Fraser, R. B. (2004). The range of coping strategies women use to manage pain and anxiety prior to and during first experience of labour. Midwifery, 20, 144 - 156.

Ford, N., SLADE, P., & Butler, G. (2004). Menopause and perceived memory problems in women. Is there a link? British Journal of General Practice, 54, 434 - 438.

Godoy-Herrera, R., Burnet, B., & CONNOLLY, K. (2004). Conservation and divergence of the genetic structure of larval foraging behaviour in two species of the Drosophila simulans clade. Memory.

Griffin, M. A., Rafferty, A. E., & Mason, C. M. (2004). Who started this? Investigating different sources of organizational change. Journal of Business and Psychology, 18, 555-570.

Gurney, K., Humphries, M., Wood, R., Prescott, T. J., & Redgrave, P. (2004). Testing computational hypotheses of brain systems function: a case study with the basal ganglia. Network: Computation in Neural Systems, 15, 263-290. Further details

GURNEY, K., & OVERTON, P. G. (2004). A model of short and long-range selective processes in neostriatum. Neurocomputing, (58 - 60), 555 - 562.

Gurney, K., Prescott, T. J., Wickens, J. R., & Redgrave, P. (2004). Computational models of the basal ganglia: from robots to membranes. Trends in Neurosciences, 27, 453-459. Further details

Gurney, K. N., & Overton, P. G. (2004). A model of short and long-range selective processes in neostriatum. Neurocomputing, 58-60, 555-562.

Hagger, M. S., & ARMITAGE, C. J. (2004). The influence of perceived loci of control and causality in the theory of planned behavior in a leisure-time exercise context. Journal of Applied Biobehavioral Research, 9, 45-64. Further details

HARDY, G. E., Aldridge, J., Davidson, C., Rowe, C., & Reilly, S. (2004). Assessing and formulating attachment issues in psychotherapy. British Journal of Psychotherapy, 20, 439-512.

Hayne, H., & Herbert, J. (2004). The effect of adults' language on long-term retention by 18-month-old infants. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 89, 127-139.

Hejmadi, A., Rozin, P., & SIEGAL, M. (2004). Once in contact, always in contact: Conceptions of essence and purification in Hindu Indian and American children. Developmental Psychobiology, 40, 467-476.

HERBERT, J., Eckerman, C. O., Goldstein, R., & M.E., S. (2004). Contrasts in classical eyeblink conditioning as a function of premature birth. Infancy, 5, 367-383. Further details

IQBAL, Z., Birchwood, M., Hemsley, D., Jackson, C., & Morris, E. (2004). Autobiographical memory and postpsychotic depression in first-episode psychosis. British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 43, 97-104.

Jamson, A. H., Westerman, S. J., HOCKEY, G. R. J., & Carsten, O. J. M. (2004). Speech-based 'email' and driver behavior: effects of in-vehicle message system interface. Human Factors, 46, 625-639.

Johnston, K. L., White, K. M., & NORMAN, P. (2004). An examination of the individual difference approach to the role of norms in the theory of reasoned action. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 34, 2524-2549.

Jones, M., Hewson-Stoate, N., Martindale, J., REDGRAVE, P., & MAYHEW, J. E. W. (2004). Non-Linear Coupling of Neural Activity and CBF in Rodent Barrel Cortex. NeuroImage, Vol 22, "No 2, 956-965".

Kavanagh, D., ANDRADE, J., & MAY, J. (2004). Beating the Urge: Implications of Research into Substance-Related Desires. Addictive Behaviours, 29, 1359-1372.

Kong, Y., ZHENG, Y., Johnston, D., Martindale, J., Jones, M., Billings, S., et al. (2004). A model of the dynamic relationship between blood flow and volume changes during brain activation. Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, 24, 1382-1392.

Leseure, M. J., Bauer, J., BIRDI, K., Neely, A. D., & Denyer, D. (2004). Adoption of Promising Practices: A Systematic Review of the Evidence. International Journal of Management Reviews, 5-6, 169-190. Further details

Maughan, B., Rowe, R., Messer, J., Goodman, R., & Meltzer, H. (2004). Conduct disorder and oppositional defiant disorder in a national sample: Developmental epidemiology. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 45(3), 609-621.

MAY, J. (2004). An information Processing view of fringe consciousness. PsycheURL. Further details

MAY, J., ANDRADE, J., PANABOKKE, N., & Kavanagh, D. (2004). Images of desire: Cognitive models of Craving. Memory, 12(4), 447-461. Further details

Mitchinson, B., Gurney, K., Redgrave, P., Melhuish, C., Pipe, A. G., Pearson, M. J., et al. (2004). Empirically inspired simulated electro-mechanical model of the rat mystacial follicle-sinus-complex. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 271, 2509-2516. Further details

Nicholl, C., & THOMPSON, A. R. (2004). The psychological treatment of PTSD in adult refugees: A review of the current state of psychological therapies. Journal of Mental Health, 13, 351-362.

Nico, D., Daprati, E., Rigal, F., PARSONS, L. M., & Sirigu, A. (2004). Left and right hands recognition in upper limb amputees. Brain. Further details

NORMAN, P., & Hoyle, S. (2004). The theory of planned behavior and breast self-examination: Distinguishing between perceived control and self-efficacy. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 34, 694-708.

PASCALIS, O., HUNKIN, N. M., Holdstock, J. S., Isaac, C. L., & Mayes, A. R. (2004). Visual paired comparison is impaired in a patient with selective hippocampal lesions and relatively intact item recognition. Neuropsychologia 42, 1293 - 1300.

Payne, N., Jones, F., & HARRIS, P. R. (2004). The role of perceived need within the theory of planned behaviour: a comparison of intentions to exercise and intentions to eat healthily. British Journal of Health Psychology, 9, 489-504.

Rafferty, A. E., & Griffin, M. A. (2004). Dimensions of transformational leadership: Conceptual and empirical extensions. The Leadership Quarterly, 15, 329-354. Further details

Rivis, A. J., & SHEERAN, P. (2004). Descriptive norms as an additional predictor in the theory of planned behaviour: A meta-analysis. Current Psychology, 22, 264-280. Further details

Robinson, A., & PASCALIS, O. (2004). Development of flexible recognition memory in human infants. Developmental Science, 7(5), 527-533.

Rowe, R., Maughan, B., & Goodman, R. (2004). Childhood psychiatric disorder and unintentional injury: Findings from a national cohort study. Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 29(2), 119-130.

Rowe, R., Maughan, B., Worthman, C. M., Costello, E. J., & Angold, A. (2004). "Testosterone, conduct disorder and social dominance in boys: Pubertal development and biosocial interaction." Biological Psychiatry, 55, 546-552.

Schomann, C., Stapel, W., NICKEL, P., Eden, J., & Nachreiner, F. (2004). BASS 4: a software system for ergonomic design and evaluation of working hours. Journal of Public Health, 38, 56-64.

Shahar, G., Trower, P., IQBAL, Z., Birchwood, M., Davidson, L., & Chadwick, P. (2004). The person in recovery from acute and severe psychosis: The role of dependency, self-criticism and efficacy. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 74, 480-488.

SIEGAL, M. (2004). Signposts to the essence of language. Science, 305, 1720-1721. Further details

SIEGAL, M. (2004). Language and conceptual development. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 8, 287 (editorial).

SIEGAL, M. (2004). Social understanding and the cognitive architecture of theory of mind. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 27, 122.

SIEGAL, M., Butterworth, G., & Newcombe, P. A. (2004). Culture and children's cosmology. Developmental Science, 7, 308-324.

SIEGAL, M., & Surian, L. (2004). Conceptual development and conversational understanding. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 8, 534-538.

Sillence, E., Briggs, P., Fishwick, L., & HARRIS, P. R. (2004). Trust and mistrust of online health websites. "Proceedings of CHI'2004. Vienna, Austria", 663-670.

Sillence, E., Briggs, P., Fishwick, L., & HARRIS, P. R. (2004). What Parents Make of MMR and the Internet. He@lth Information on the Internet, 39, 5-6.

Smith-Spark, J. H., FAWCETT, A. J., NICOLSON, R. I., & Fisk, J. E. (2004). Dyslexic students have more everyday cognitive lapses. Memory, 12(2), 174-182. Further details

Sparks, P., HARRIS, P. R., & Lockwood, N. (2004). Predictors and predictive effects of ambivalence. British Journal of Social Psychology, 43, 371-384.

Stafford, T., & Gurney, K. (2004). The Role of Response Mechanisms in Determining Reaction Time Performance: Pieron's Law Revisited. Psychonomic Bulletin Review, 11(6), 975-987.

Stiles, W. B., Glick, M. J., Osatuke, K., HARDY, G. E., Shapiro, D. A., Agnew-Davies, R., et al. (2004). Patterns of alliance development and the rupture-repair hypothesis: Are productive relationships U-shaped or V-shaped? Journal of Counseling Psychology, 51, 81-91. Further details

Sutton, G., & Griffin, M. A. (2004). Integrating expectations, experiences, and psychological contract violations. Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, 77, 493-514.

TAROYAN, N., VIGON, L., BUCKLEY, D., Woodruff, P., Young, C., Saatchi, R., et al. (2004). The effects of ageing on stereopsis A VEP study. Documenta Ophthalmologica, 108, 185-196.

Trafimow, D., SHEERAN, P., Lombardo, B., Finlay, K. A., & ARMITAGE, C. J. (2004). Affective and cognitive control of persons and behaviors. British Journal of Social Psychology, 43, 207-224. Further details

Trepka, C., Rees, A., Shapiro, D. A., & HARDY, G. E. (2004). Therapist competence and outcome of cognitive therapy for depression. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 28, 143-157. Further details

Vance, Y. H., & EiSER, C. (2004). Caring for a child with cancer: A systematic review. Pediatric Blood and Cancer, 42, 249-253.

Vance, Y. H., EiSER, C., & Horne, B. (2004). The Long-term impact of a brain tumour on children's social and family functioning. Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 9, 271-288.

Vedhara, K., Wadsworth, E., NORMAN, P., Searle, A., Mitchell, J., Macrae, N., et al. (2004). Habitual prospective memory in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes: Implications for medication adherence. "Psychology, Health and Medicine", 9, 17-27.

Waterman, A. H., BLADES, M., & SPENCER, C. P. (2004). Indicating when you do not know the answer: The effect of question format and interviewer knowledge on children's 'don't know' responses. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 22, 135-148.

Waterman, A. H., BLADES, M., & SPENCER, C. P. (2004). Is a jumper angrier than a tree? The implications for interviewing children. The Psychologist, 14, 474-477.

Webb, T. L., & SHEERAN, P. (2004). Identifying good opportunities to act: Implementation intentions and cue discrimination. European Journal Of Social Psychology, 34, 407-419. Further details

Wilson, N., Clegg, J., & HARDY, G. E. (2004). Life stories: professionals' perspectives. Individual in society. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 48, 463-485.

Wood, R., Gurney, K., & Wilson, C. J. (2004). A novel parameter optimisation technique for compartmental models applied to a model of a striatal medium spiny neuron. Neurocomputing, 58-60, 1109-1116. Further details

WRIGHT, I., & Limond, J. (2004). A developmental framework for memory rehabilitation in children. Pediatric Rehabilitation, 7, 85-96. Further details

PASCALIS, O., Kelly, D. J., & Caldara, R. (2006). What Bees can really tell us about the face processing system in Humans? A response to Dyer et al (2005). Journal of Experimental Biology, 209(16), 3266-3267.

Aked, J., COIZET, V., Clark, D., & OVERTON, P. G. (2005). Local injection of a glutamate uptake inhibitor into the ventral tegmental area produces sensitization to the behavioural effects of d-amphetamine. Neuroscience, 134, 361 - 367.

Aked, J., COIZET, V., Clark, D., & Overton, P. G. (2005). Local injection of a glutamate uptake inhibitor into the ventral tegmental area produces sensitization to the behavioural effects of d-amphetamine. Neuroscience, 134, 361-367.

ANDRADE, J. (2005). Editorial: Does memory priming during anesthesia matter? Anesthesiology.

ARMITAGE, C. J. (2005). Can the theory of planned behavior predict the maintenance of physical activity? Health Psychology, 24, 235-245. Further details

Barkham, M., Leach, C., Shapiro, D. A., HARDY, G. E., Lucock, M., & Rees, A. (2005). Rewiring efficacy studies to increase their relevance to routine practice. . Mental Health and Learning Disabilities research and Practice, 2, 12-18.

Beart, S., HARDY, G. E., & Buchan, L. (2005). How people with learning disabilities view their social identity: A review of the literature. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 18, 47-56. Further details

BERWICK, J., Devonshire, I. M., MARTINDALE, A. J., JOHNSTON, D., ZHENG, Y., Kennerley, A. J., et al. (2005). Cocaine administration produces a protracted decoupling of neural and haemodynamic responses to intense sensory stimuli. Neuroscience, 132, 361-374.

BERWICK, J., DEVONSHIRE, I. M., MARTINDALE, J., JOHNSTON, D., ZHENG, Y., KENNERLEY, A. J., et al. (2005). Cocaine administration produces a protracted decoupling of neural and haemodynamic responses to intense sensory stimuli. Neuroscience, 132, 361 - 374.

Berwick, J., Johnston, D., Jones, M., Martindale, J., Redgrave, P., McLoughlin, N., et al. (2005). Neurovascular coupling investigated with two-dimensional optical imaging spectroscopy in rat whisker barrel cortex. Eur J Neurosci, 22, 1655-1666.

Birchwood, M., IQBAL, Z., & Upthegrove, R. (2005). Psychological pathways to depression in schizophrenia: Studies in acute psychosis, post psychotic depression and auditory hallucinations. European Archives of Psychiatry & Clinical Neuroscience, 255, 202-212.

BIRDI, K. (2005). No idea? Evaluating the effectiveness of creativity training. . Journal of European Industrial Training, 29(2), 102-111. Further details

Black, S., HARDY, G. E., TURPIN, G., & Parry, G. (2005). Self-reported attachment style and therapuetic orientation of therapists and heir relationship with reported general alliance quality and problems in therapy. Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, and Practice, 78, 363-377.

BLADES, M., & Krahenbuhl, S. (2005). The effect of interviewing techniques on young children's responses to questions. Child: Care, Health and Development.

Bradshaw, Z., & SLADE, P. (2005). The relationships between induced abortion, attitudes towards sexuality and sexual problems. Sexual and Relationship Therapy., 20(391-406).

Brown, S., Martinez, M. J., & PARSONS, L. M. (2005). The neural basis of human dance. Cerebral Cortex, 16, 1157 - 1167. Further details

Clarke, S. A., Davies, H., Jenney, M., Glaser, A., & EISER, C. (2005). Parental communication and children's behaviour following diagnosis of childhood leukaemia. Psycho-Oncology, 14, 274-281. Further details

Combes, H., HARDY, G. E., & Buchan, L. (2005). Using Q-methodology to involve people with intellectual disability in evaluating person-centred learning. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 17, 149-160. Further details

Crossley, J., EiSER, C., & Davies, H. (2005). Children and their parents assessing the doctor- patient interaction: a rating system for doctors communication skills. Medical Education, 35, 820-828.

DAVIES, J. (2005). Faculty of Forensic Clinical Psychology response to the BPS document: "Understanding Personality Disorder".

DAVIES, J., & Bailey, H. (2005). Membership survey 2004. Part II: Continued Professional Development and Knowledge Sharing. Forensic Update, 81, 5-8.

DAVIES, J., & Bailey, H. (2005). Membership survey 2004. Part I: The Division and its Membership. Forensic Update, 80, 4-8.

DAVIES, J., & Cohen, L. (2005). Pre-qualification training in Clinical Psychology: Competencies and capabilities within Forensic Clinical Psychology. Paper written on behalf of the Faculty of Forensic Clinical Psychology, DCP.

DEEPROSE, C., & ANDRADE, J. (2005). Is priming during anesthesia unconscious? Consciousness & Cognition.

DEEPROSE, C., ANDRADE, J., Harrison, D., & Edwards, N. E. (2005). Unconscious memory priming during anaesthesia. British Journal of Anaesthesia, 94(1), 57-62.

DOMMETT, E., COIZET, V., OVERTON, P. G., & REDGRAVE, P. (2005). How dopaminergic neurones respond to visual stimuli at short latency. . Science, 307, 1476 - 1479.

Dommett, E. J., COIZET, V., Overton, P. G., & REDGRAVE, P. (2005). How dopaminergic neurones respond to visual stimuli at short latency. Science, 307, 1476-1479.

Earle, E. A., Davies, H., Greenfield, D., Ross, R., & EISER, C. (2005). Follow-up care for young people who have been treated for cancer: A focus groups analysis. European Journal of Cancer, 41, 2882-2886. Further details

Earle, E. A., EISER, C., & Davies, H. (2005). He never liked sport anyway - Mother's views of young people coping with a bone tumour in the lower limb. Sarcoma, 9, 7-13.

EISER, C., EISER, J. R., Mayhew, A. G., & Gibson, A. T. (2005). Parenting the premature infant: balancing vulnerability and quality of life. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 1169-1177. Further details

EISER, C., EISER, J. R., & Stride, C. (2005). Quality of life in children newly diagnosed with cancer and their mothers. Quality of Life and Health Outcomes, "3, 2". Further details

Elliot, M. A., ARMITAGE, C. J., & Baughan, C. J. (2005). Exploring the beliefs underpinning drivers' intentions to comply with speed limits. Transportation Research Part F: Psychology and Behaviour, 8, 459-479. Further details

Escott, D., SLADE, P., Spiby, H., & Fraser, R. B. (2005). Preliminary evaluation of a coping strategy enhancement method of preparation for labour. Midwifery, 21, 278-291.

Gias, C., Hewson-Stoate, N., Jones, M., Johnston, D., MAYHEW, J. E. W., & Coffey, P. (2005). Retinotopy within rat primary visual cortex using optical imaging. NeuroImage, 24, 200-206.

Gooding, P. A., ISAAC, C. L., & Mayes, A. R. (2005). Prose recall and amnesia: More implications for the episodic buffer. Neuropsychologia, 43, 583-587.

GRANDFIELD, T., THOMPSON, A. R., & TURPIN, G. (2005). An attitudinal study of responses to a range of dermatological conditions using the Implicit Association Test. . Journal of Health Psychology, 10, 821-829.

HARDY, G. E., Cahill, J., Stiles, W. B., Massey, C., Barkham, M., & MacAskill, N. (2005). Sudden gains in cognitive therapy for depression: A replication and extension. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 73, 59-67. Further details

HARRIS, P. R., & Napper, L. (2005). Self-affirmation and the biased processing of threatening health-risk information. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 31, 1250-1263.

HARRIS, P. R., & Smith, V. (2005). When the risks are low: the impact of absolute and comparative information on disturbance and understanding in US and UK samples. Psychology and Health, 20, 319-330.

Hayne, H., & HERBERT, J. (2005). Verbal Cues Facilitate Memory Retrieval During Infancy. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology.

Hewson-Stoate, N., Jones, M., Martindale, J., Berwick, J., & MAYHEW, J. E. W. (2005). Further nonlinearities in neurovascular coupling in rodent barrel cortex. NeuroImage, 24, 565-574.

Humphries, M. D., Gurney, K., & Prescott, T. J. (2005). Is there an integrative center in the vertebrate brain-stem? A robotic evaluation of a model of the reticular formation viewed as an action selection device. Adaptive Behavior, 13, 97-113. Further details

Jones, F., HARRIS, P. R., Waller, H., & Coggins, A. (2005). Adherence to an exercise prescription scheme: the role of expectations, self efficacy, stage of change and psychological well-being. British Journal of Health Psychology, 10, 359-378.

Jones, M., Berwick, J., Hewson Stoate, N., Gias, G., & MAYHEW, J. E. W. (2005). The effect of hypercapnia on the neural and hemodynamic response to somatosensory stimulation. NeuroImage, 27, 609-623.

Kavanagh, D., & ANDRADE, J. (2005). Imaginary relish and exquisite torture: The Elaborated Intrusion theory of desire. Psychological Review, 112(2), 446-467.

Kavanagh, D., ANDRADE, J., & MAY, J. (2005). The imaginary relish: a cognitive-emotional account of craving. Psychological Review, 112, 446-497.

Kelly, D. J., Quinn, P. C., Slater, A. M., Lee, K., Gibson, A., Smith, M., et al. (2005). Three-month-olds, but not newborns, prefer own-race faces. Developmental Science, 8(6), 31-36.

Last, B. F., Grootenhuis, M., & EISER, C. (2005). Challenges for psychosocial research in long term survivors of childhood cancer. Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 30, 99-114. Further details

Lobeck, M., THOMPSON, A. R., & Shankland, M. C. (2005). The importance of social context in adjustment: An exploration of the experience of stroke for men in retirement transition. . Qualitative Health Research, 15, 1022-1036.

Loretto, W., Popham, F., Platt, S., Pavis, S., HARDY, G. E., MacLeod, L., et al. (2005). Assessing psychological well-being: A holistic investigation of NHS employees. International Review of Psychiatry, 17, 329-336.

Martindale, J., Berwick, J., Martin, C., Kong, Y., Zheng, Y., & Mayhew, J. E. W. (2005). Long duration stimuli and nonlinearities in the neural-haemodynamic coupling. Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow Metabolism, 25, 651-661.

Mason, C. M., Chang, A. M., & Griffin, M. A. (2005). Strategic use of employee surveys: Using a quasi-linkage approach to model the drivers of organizational effectiveness. Australian Journal of Management., 30, 127-143.

Mason, C. M., & Griffin, M. A. (2005). Group task satisfaction: The group's shared attitude to its task and task environment. Group and Organization Management., 30, 625-652.

MILNE, E., Swettenham, J., & Campbell, R. (2005). Motion perception and autistic spectrum disorder: A review. Current Psychology of Cognition, 23, pp 4-34. Recent evidence has indicated that some children with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) show reduced ability to detect visual motion. The data suggest that this impairment is present in children with a range of autistic spectrum diagnoses, but not present in all children diagnosed with ASD. The occurrence of abnormal motion perception in children with ASD has led to speculation regarding the root of this impairment. Hypotheses regarding reduced sensitivity of the visual magnocellular system / cortical dorsal stream (Milne et al., 2002; Spencer et al., 2000) and reduced neuronal integration (Bertone et al., 2003), will be discussed in this review. Clinical implications of the impairment, such as the degree to which motion perception may be related to diagnostic criteria and /or symptom severity in ASD, and the relationship between abnormal motion perception in autistic spectrum, and other, non-autistic spectrum developmental disorders will also be discussed. The conclusion is drawn that more research should be carried out including larger samples of participants, and that in future studies researchers should provide details of the variability of performance in their data, and investigate relationships between motion perception, diagnostic criteria, symptom severity and other potential correlates which, it is hoped will lead to further understanding of the implications of abnormal motion perception in ASD. Further details

Mohammed, T., Campbell, R., MacSweeney, M., MILNE, E., & Coleman, M. (2005). Speechreading skill and visual movement sensitivity are related in deaf speechreaders. Perception, 34, 205 - 216. Individual speechreading abilities have been linked with a range of cognitive and language-processing factors. The role of specifically visual abilities in relation to the processing of visible speech is less studied. Here we report that the detection of coherent visible motion in random-dot kinematogram displays is related to speechreading skill in deaf, but not in hearing, speechreaders. A control task requiring the detection of visual form showed no such relationship. Additionally, people born deaf were better speechreaders than hearing people on a new test of silent speechreading. Further details

NICKEL, P., & HOCKEY, G. R. J. (2005). On-line Assessment of Psychophysiological Markers of Operator Functional State under Dynamic Task Load. Psychophysiology, 42, S25.

NORMAN, P., & Brain, K. (2005). An application of an extended health belief model to the prediction of breast self-examination among women with a family history of breast cancer. British Journal of Health Psychology, 10, 1-11.

NORMAN, P., Clark, T., & Walker, G. (2005). The theory of planned behavior, descriptive norms and the moderating role of group identification. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 35, 1008-1029.

NORMAN, P., & Conner, M. (2005). The theory of planned behavior and exercise: Evidence for the mediating and moderating roles of planning on intention-behavior relations. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 27, 488-504.

Pahl, S., HARRIS, P. R., Todd, H. A., & Rutter, D. R. (2005). Comparative optimism for environmental risks. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 25, 1-11.

PARSONS, L. M., Sergent, J., Hodges, D. A., & Fox, P. T. (2005). Brain basis of piano performance. Neuropsychologia, 43, 199 - 215. Further details

PASCALIS, O., Scott, L. S., Kelly, D. J., Shannon, R. W., Nicholson, E., Coleman, M., et al. (2005). Plasticity of Face Processing in Infancy. Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, 102, 5297-5300.

Paul, M., NICKEL, P., & Nachreiner, F. (2005). Work load and days lost due to illness Ð exploratory time series analyses of a longitudinal study on the nursing staff of a general hospital [in German]. Zeitschrift fŸr Arbeitswissenschaft, 59, 152-161.

Payne, N., Jones, F., & HARRIS, P. R. (2005). The impact of job strain on the predictive validity of the Theory of Planned Behaviour: An investigation of exercise and healthy eating. British Journal of Health Psychology, 10, 115-132.

Pearson, M. J., Gilhespy, I., Melhuish, C., Mitchinson, B., Nibouche, M., Pipe, A. G., et al. (2005). A biomimetic haptic sensor. Journal of Advanced Robotic Systems, 2, 235-343. Further details

Pearson, M. J., Gilhespy, I., Melhuish, C., Mitchinson, B., Nibouche, M., Pipe, A. G., et al. (2005). A Biologically inspired haptic sensor array for use in mobile robotic vehicles. Proceedings of Towards Autonomous Robotic Systems (TAROS). Further details

Robinson, M., Sparrow, P. R., CLEGG, C., & BIRDI, K. (2005). Design engineering competencies: Future requirements and predicted changes in the forthcoming decade. Design Studies, 26, 123-153.

Rowe, R., Maughan, B., Costello, E. J., & Angold, A. (2005). Defining oppositional defiant disorder. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 46(12), 1309-1316.

SHEERAN, P., Aarts, H., Custers, R., Rivis, A., Webb, T. L., & Cooke, R. (2005). The goal-dependent automaticity of drinking habits. British Journal of Social Psychology, 44, 47-64. Further details

SHEERAN, P., Webb, T. L., & Gollwitzer, P. M. (2005). The interplay between goal intentions and implementation intentions. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 31, 87-98. Further details

Shipton, H., Fay, D., West, M., Patterson, M., & BIRDI, K. (2005). Managing people to promote innovation. Creativity and Innovation Management, 14(2), 118-128. Further details

SIEGAL, M. (2005). Review of S. Goldin-Meadow, The resilience of language. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 23, 154-155.

SIEGAL, M., & Aboud, F. (2005). Characterizing the scope of socialization and its impact on health: A commentary on Singh-Manoux and Marmot's "Role of socialization in explaining social inequalities in health". Social Science and Medicine, 60, 2269-2271.

Sillence, E., Briggs, P., Fishwick, L., & HARRIS, P. R. (2005). Do health web sites offer patients personalised information and advice? He@lth Information on the Internet, 48(December 2005), 9-10.

Simpson, J., Anthony, S. H., Schmeer, S., & OVERTON, P. G. (2005). Food-related contextual factors substantially modify the disgust response. Food Quality and Preference.

Sklavos, S., PORRILL, J., Kaneko, C. R. S., & DEAN, P. (2005). Evidence for a wide range of time scales in oculomotor plant dynamics: Implications for models of eye-movement control. Vision Research, 45(12), 1525-1542.

SLADE, P., & Cordle, C. (2005). Psychological Aspects of the Management of Chronic Pelvic Pain. . Current Obstetrics & Gynaecology, 15, 298-305.

Stafford, T., & Gurney, K. (2005). The role of response mechanisms in determining reaction time performance: Pieron's law revisited. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 11, 975-987. Further details

Upton, P., EiSER, C., Cheung, W. Y., Hutchings, H., Jenney, M., Maddocks, A., et al. (2005). Measurement properties of the UK-English version of the pediatric quality of life inventoryÊ (Pedsql4.0) generic core scales. Quality of Life and Health Outcomes, 3, 22. Further details

Upton, P., Maddocks, A., EISER, C., Barnes, P. M., & Williams, J. (2005). Development of a Measure of the Health Related Quality of Life of Children in Public Care. Child: Care, Health and Development, 31, 409-415. Further details

Varley, R., Klessinger, N., Romanowski, C. A. J., & SIEGAL, M. (2005). Agrammatic but numerate. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 102, 3519-3524.

Waller, H., EiSER, C., Knowles, J., Heller, S., & Price, K. (2005). Adolescents' and their parents' views on the acceptability and design of a new diabetes education programme: a focus group analysis. Child: Care, Health and Development, 31, 283-289. Further details

Waller, H., EiSER, C., Knowles, J., Heller, S., & Price, K. (2005). Implementing a new paediatric structured education programme. Journal of Diabetes Nursing, 9, 332-339.

Webb, T. L., & SHEERAN, P. (2005). Integrating goal theories to understand the achievement of personal goals. European Journal Of Social Psychology, 35, 69-96. Further details

Wittaker, S., HARDY, G. E., & Lewis, K. (2005). A qualitative exploration of psychological wellbeing with young Somali refugee and asylum-seeker women living in Northern England. Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 10, 177-196. Further details

ABSOLOM, K., Greenfield, D., Ross, R., Horne, B., Davies, H., Glaser, A., et al. (2006). Predictors of clinic satisfaction among adult survivors of childhood cancer. European Journal of Cancer, 42, 1421-1427. Childhood cancer survivors experience a wide range of late-effects. As survival rates improve, follow-up in paediatric clinics becomes less feasible, and alternative models of care have been proposed. In this study, satisfaction among those attending a traditional paediatric late-effects clinic was compared with a multi-disciplinary clinic in an adult setting. Survivors (adult clinic n = 93, paediatric clinic n = 105, age 16–39 years) completed measures of symptoms, understanding of vulnerability to late-effects, purpose of follow-up, satisfaction and number of topics discussed. Predictors of satisfaction were: number of topics discussed, greater understanding of the purpose of follow-up and sex. Females, and those reporting longer waiting time were less satisfied. Aspects of clinic organisation, including shorter waiting times and opportunities to discuss health concerns, are more important in determining patient satisfaction than clinic type. Survivors’ understanding of the purpose of follow-up is also integral in determining satisfaction. Further details

ARMITAGE, C. J. (2006). Evidence that implementation intentions promote transitions through the stages of change. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 74(141-151). Further details

ARMITAGE, C. J., & HARRIS, P. R. (2006). The Influence of Adult Attachment on Symptom Reporting: Testing a Mediational Model in a Sample of the General Population. Psychology and Health, 21, 351-366.

AXTELL, C. M., PARKER, S. K., Holman, D. J., & TOTTERDELL, P. (2006). Enhancing customer service: Perspective taking in a call center. European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology.

Beck, S. R., Robinson, E. R., CARROLL, D. J., & Apperly, I. A. (2006). Children´s thinking about counterfactuals and future hypotheticals as possibilities. Child Development, 77(2), 413-426.

Beresford, J., & BLADES, M. (2006). Children’s identification of faces from line-ups - the effects of line-up presentation and instructions. . Journal of Applied Psychology, 91, 1102-1113.

BIRDI, K. (2006). A lighthouse in the desert? Evaluating the effectiveness of creativity training on employee innovation. Journal of Creative Behavior.

Brown, A., Robinson, A., HERBERT, J., & PASCALIS, O. (2006). Age and emotional salience of stimuli alter the expression of visual recognition memory. Current Psychology Letters, 20(3).

Brown, S., Martinez, M. J., & PARSONS, L. M. (2006). The neural basis of human dance. . Cerebral Cortex, 16, 1157 - 1167.

Brown, S., Martinez, M. J., & PARSONS, L. M. (2006). Music and language side by side in the brain: A PET study of generating melodies and sentences. European Journal of Neuroscience, 23, 2791-2803. Further details

Buckley, J. V., Newman, D. W., Kellett, S., & BEAIL, N. (2006). A naturalistic comparison of the effectiveness of trainee and qualified clinical psychologists. Psychology and Psychotherapy-Theory Research and Practice, 79, 137-144.

Bush, A., & BEAIL, N. (2006). Dementia assessments for people with learning disabilities: Ethical and practical issues. Clinical Psychology and People with Learning Disabilities, 4, 18-20.

Cahill, J., BARKHAM, M., Stiles, W. B., Twigg, E., HARDY, G. E., Rees, A., et al. (2006). Convergent validity of the CORE measure with measures of depression for clients in cognitive therapy for depression. . Journal of Counseling Psychology, 53, 253-259.

Clarke, S. A., Booth, L., Velikova, G., & Hewison, J. (2006). Social Support: Gender Differences in Cancer Patients in the United Kingdom. Cancer Nursing, 29(1), 66-72. Further details

Cocoran, R., Cummins, S., ROWSE, G., Moore, R., Blackwood, N., Howard, R., et al. (2006). Reasoning Under Uncertainty: Heuristic Judgements in Patients with Persecutory Delusions. . Psychological Medicine, 36, 1109-1118. Objective. The substantial literature examining social reasoning in people with delusions has, to date, neglected the commonest form of decision making in daily life. We address this imbalance by reporting here the findings of the first study to explore heuristic reasoning in people with persecutory delusions. Method. People with active or remitted paranoid delusions, depressed and healthy adults performed two novel heuristic reasoning tasks that varied in emotional valence. Results. The findings indicated that people with persecutory delusions displayed biases during heuristic reasoning that were most obvious when reasoning about threatening and positive material. Clear similarities existed between the currently paranoid group and the depressed group in terms of their reasoning about the likelihood of events happening to them, with both groups tending to believe that pleasant things would not happen to them. However, only the currently paranoid group showed an increased tendency to view other people as threatening. Conclusion. This study has initiated the exploration of heuristic reasoning in paranoia and depression. The findings have therapeutic utility and future work could focus on the differentiation of paranoia and depression at a cognitive level. Correspondence: c1 Address for correspondence: Dr Rhiannon Corcoran, School of Psychological Sciences, University of Manchester, Coupland 1 Building, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL, UK. (Email: rhiannon.corcoran@manchester.ac.uk) Further details

COIZET, V., DOMMETT, E., WALTON, N., REDGRAVE, P., & OVERTON, P. G. (2006). Nociceptive responses of midbrain dopaminergic neurons are modulated by the superior colliculus in the rat. . Neuroscience.

COIZET, V., DOMMETT, E., WALTON, N., REDGRAVE, P., & Overton, P. G. (2006). Nociceptive responses of midbrain dopaminergic neurons are modulated by the superior colliculus in the rat. Neuroscience, 139, 1479-1493.

DAVIES, J., & O'Meara, A. (2006). A qualitative analysis of sadism in a group of Irish undergraduates. . British Journal of Forensic Practice.

Detert, N., Llewelyn, S., HARDY, G. E., Barkham, M., & Stiles, W. B. (2006). Assimilation in good and poor-outcome cases of very brief psychotherapy for mild depression. Psychotherapy Research, 16, 393-407.

Dufour, V., PASCALIS, O., & Petit, O. (2006). Face processing limitation to own species in primates, a response to social needs? Behavioural Processes, 73, 107-113.

EISER, C., ABSOLOM, K., Greenfield, D., Glaser, A., Horne, B., Waite, H., et al. (2006). Follow-up after childhood cancer: Matching survivor needs and resources. European Journal of Cancer, 42, 3186-3190.

EISER, C., Davies, H., Jenney, M., Stride, C., & Glaser, A. (2006). HRQOL implications of treatment with dexamethasone for children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukeamia (ALL). Pediatric Blood and Cancer, 46, 35-39.

EISER, C., Vance, Y. H., Glaser, A., Galvin, H., Horne, B., Picton, S., et al. (2006). Growth hormone treatment and Quality of life among survivors of childhood ALL and CNS tumours. Hormone Research.

Elliot, M. A., & ARMITAGE, C. J. (2006). Effects of implementation intentions on the self-reported frequency of drivers' compliance with speed limits. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, 12, 108-117. Further details

Farrand, P., & Rowe, R. (2006). Characteristics of areca nut use amongst South Asian schoolchildren in Tower Hamlets, London. Community Dental Health, 23, 58-61.

Gollwitzer, P. M., & Sheeran, P. (2006). Implementation intentions and goal achievement: A meta-analysis of effects and processes. Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, 38, 69-119. Further details

Griffin, M. A., Neal, A., & Parker, S. (2006). A new model of work role performance: Positive behavior in uncertain and interdependent contexts. Academy of Management Journal. Further details

Gurney, K. (2006). Neural networks for perceptual processing: from simulation tools to theories. Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci, 362, 339-353. Further details

Herbert, J., Gross, J., & Hayne, H. (2006). Age-Related Changes in Deferred Imitation between 6 and 9 Months of Age. Infant Behavior and Development, 29, 136-139.

Hobson, J., SLADE, P., Wrench, I., & Power, L. (2006). Preoperative anxiety and postoperative satisfaction in women undergoing elective caesarian. International Journal of Obstetric Anaesthesia., 15, 18-23.

Humphries, M. D., Gurney, K., & Prescott, T. J. (2006). The brainstem reticular formation is a small-world, not scale-free, network. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 273, 503-511. Further details

Humphries, M. D., Stewart, R. D., & Gurney, K. (2006). A physiologically plausible model of action selection and oscillatory activity in the basal ganglia. Journal of Neuroscience, 26(50), 12921-12942. Further details

ISAAC, C. L., Cushway, D., & Jones, G. V. (2006). Is Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Associated with Specific Deficits in Episodic Memory. Clinical Psychology Review, 26, 939-955.

Jones, E. J. H., & Herbert, J. (2006). Building a Memory Representation: Deferred Imitation and Declarative Memory in Infancy. Infant and Child Development, 15, 195-205.

Jones, E. J. H., & Herbert, J. (2006). Using deferred imitation to understand the process of change in infant memory development. Infant and Child Development, 15, 215-218.

Jones, R., Rafferty, A. E., & GRIFFIN, M. A. (2006). The executive coaching trend: Toward more flexible executives. Leadership and Organization Development Journal.

Jones, S. H., Tai, S., Evershed, K., KNOWLES, R., & Bentall, R. P. (2006). Early detection of bipolar disorder: A pilot familial high-risk study of parents with bipolar disorder and their adolescent children. Bipolar Disorders, 8, 362-372. Objectives: Disturbances in cognition, affect, sleep and activity have been identified in bipolar disorder (BD) but little is known about the possible role of these factors in the development of the condition. We studied these variables in a familial high-risk sample. Methods: Twenty-five children (13–19 years) of bipolar parents were compared with 22 similar aged children of age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Participants were assessed using Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia-Lifetime version (SADS-L) and completed self-report measures of dysfunctional attitudes, behavioural inhibition/activation, social rhythms, coping styles and subjective experience of sleep. Children completed a 7-day recording of actigraphy (sleep and activity) and a 7-day diary measuring self-esteem, positive and negative affect and reactions to positive and negative events. Results: Fifty-six per cent of children of bipolar parents (CBP) reported mood symptoms compared to 9% of children of control parents (CC). The CBP group had coping styles and instability of self-esteem consistent with abnormal strategies for regulating affect. Both groups also differed on sleep measures. The majority of differences observed were between CBP with a current or past mood diagnosis and CC. BD parents reported dysfunctional coping styles and (to a lesser extent) disrupted activity patterns. Conclusions: A familial high-risk strategy for studying the role of psychological factors in BD is feasible and informative. This pilot study indicates that abnormal coping styles, instability of self-esteem and dysregulation of sleep may be early markers of bipolar illness. However, current findings need to be explored further in longitudinal studies to clarify which potential markers are truly predictive of BD. Further details

Krahenbuhl, S., & BLADES, M. (2006). The effect of question repetition within interviews on young children's eyewitness recall. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 94, 57-67.

Martin, C., Jones, M., Martindale, J., & Mayhew, J. (2006). Haemodynamic and neural responses to hypercapnia in the awake rat. Eur J Neurosci, 24(9), 2601-2610. The relationship between localized changes in brain activity and metabolism, and the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal used in functional magnetic resonance imaging studies is not fully understood. One source of complexity is that stimulus-elicited changes in the BOLD signal arise both from changes in oxygen consumption due to increases in activity and purely 'haemodynamic' changes such as increases in cerebral blood flow. It is well established that robust cortical haemodynamic changes can be elicited by increasing the concentration of inspired CO(2) (inducing hypercapnia) and it is widely believed that these haemodynamic changes occur without significant effects upon neural activity or cortical metabolism. Hypercapnia is therefore commonly used as a calibration condition in functional magnetic resonance imaging studies to enable estimation of oxidative metabolism from subsequent stimulus-evoked functional magnetic resonance imaging BOLD signal changes. However, there is little research that has investigated in detail the effects of hypercapnia upon all components of the haemodynamic response (changes in cerebral blood flow, volume and oxygenation) in addition to recording neural activity. In awake animals, we used optical and electrophysiological techniques to measure cortical haemodynamic and field potential responses to hypercapnia (60 s, 5% CO(2)). The main findings are that firstly, in the awake rat, the temporal structure of the haemodynamic response to hypercapnia differs from that reported previously in anaesthetized preparations in that the response is more rapid. Secondly, there is evidence that hypercapnia alters ongoing neural activity in awake rats by inducing periods of cortical desynchronization and this may be associated with changes in oxidative metabolism. Further details

Martin, C., Martindale, J., Berwick, J., & Mayhew, J. E. W. (2006). Investigating neural-hemodynamic coupling and the hemodynamic response function in the awake rat. NeuroImage, 32, 33-48.

Mason, S. M., Wardrobe, J., TURPIN, G., Woods, D., & Rowlands, A. (2006). A Prospective Study of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Accident and Emergency Attenders. British Journal Of Clinical Psychology, 45(217-230).

MATTHEWS, D., Lieven, E., Theakston, A., & Tomasello, M. (2006). The effect of perceptual availability and prior discourse on young children’s use of referring expressions. Applied Psycholinguistics, 27, 403-422. Choosing appropriate referring expressions requires assessing whether a referent is “available” to the addressee either perceptually or through discourse. In Study 1, we found that 3- and 4-year-olds, but not 2-year-olds, chose different referring expressions (noun vs. pronoun) depending on whether their addressee could see the intended referent or not. In Study 2, in more neutral discourse contexts than previous studies, we found that 3- and 4-year-olds clearly differed in their use of referring expressions according to whether their addressee had already mentioned a referent. Moreover, 2-year-olds responded with more naming constructions when the referent had not been mentioned previously. This suggests that, despite early social–cognitive developments, (a) it takes time to master the given/new contrast linguistically, and (b) children understand the contrast earlier based on discourse, rather than perceptual context. Further details

MATTHEWS, D., & Theakston, A. (2006). Errors of omission in English-speaking children’s production of plurals and the past tense: The effects of frequency, phonology and competition. Cognitive Science, 30, 1027-1052. How do English-speaking children inflect nouns for plurality and verbs for the past tense? We assess theoretical answers to this question by considering errors of omission, which occur when children produce a stem in place of its inflected counterpart (e.g., saying “dress” to refer to 5 dresses). A total of 307 children (aged 3;11-9;9) participated in 3 inflection studies. In Study 1, we show that errors of omission occur until the age of 7 and are more likely with both sibilant regular nouns (e.g., dress) and irregular nouns (e.g., man) than regular nouns (e.g., dog). Sibilant nouns are more likely to be inflected if they are high frequency. In Studies 2 and 3, we show that similar effects apply to the inflection of verbs and that there is an advantage for “regular-like” irregulars whose inflected form, but not stem form, ends in d/t. The results imply that (a) stems and inflected forms compete for production and (b) children generalize both product-oriented and source-oriented schemas when learning about inflectional morphology. Further details

McHaffie, J. G., Jiang, H., May, P. G., COIZET, V., OVERTON, P. G., Stein, B. E., et al. (2006). A direct projection from superior colliculus to substantia nigra pars compacta in the cat. . Neuroscience, 138, 221-234.

McHaffie, J. G., Jiang, H., MAY, P. J., COIZET, V., Overton, P. G., Stein, B. E., et al. (2006). A direct projection from superior colliculus to substantia nigra pars compacta in the cat. . Neuroscience, 138, 221-234.

Messer, J., Goodman, R., Rowe, R., Meltzer, H., & Maughan, B. (2006). Preadolescent conduct problems in girls and boys. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 45(2), 184-191.

MILNE, E., White, S., Campbell, R., Swettenham, J., Hansen, P., & Ramus, F. (2006). Motion and form coherence in autistic spectrum disorder: Relationship to motor control and 2:4 digit ratio. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 36, 225-237. Children with autistic spectrum disorder and controls performed tasks of coherent motion and form detection, and motor control. Additionally, the ratio of the 2nd and 4th digits of these children, which is thought to be an indicator of foetal testosterone, was measured. Children in the experimental group were impaired at tasks of motor control, and had lower 2D:4D than controls. There were no group differences in motion or form detection. However a sub-group of children with autism were selectively impaired at motion detection. There were significant relationships between motion coherence detection and motor control in both groups of children, and also between motion detection, fine motor control and 2D:4D in the group of children with autistic spectrum disorder. KEY WORDS: Motion detection; motor control; foetal testosterone; autistic spectrum disorder. Further details

Monti, M. M., Osheron, D., Martinez, M. J., & PARSONS, L. M. (2006). Functional neuroanatomy of deductive inference. Under review.

Moore, R., Blackwood, N., Cocoran, R., ROWSE, G., Kinderman, P., Bentall, R. P., et al. (2006). Misunderstanding the Intentions of Others: The Cognitive Aetiology of Persecutory Delusions in Very Late-Onset Schizophrenia-like Psychosis. . American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 14(5), 410-418. From the Section of Old Age Psychiatry (RM, RH) and the Department of Forensic Mental Health Science (NB), Institute of Psychiatry, London, U.K.; the Department of Psychology (RC, GR, RB), University of Manchester, Manchester, U.K.; and the Division of Clinical Psychology (PK), University of Liverpool, Liverpool, U.K. Objective: The objective of this study was to explore the cognitive etiology of persecutory delusion formation and maintenance in very late-onset schizophrenia-like psychosis (SLP). Method: Probabilistic reasoning, causal attributional style, and mentalizing ability were examined in 29 patients with SLP, 30 with onset of depression after the age of 60 years and 30 healthy comparison subjects. Results: Patients with SLP made significantly more errors than the healthy comparison group in deception, but not false belief, mentalizing tasks. There were no significant performance differences between groups on the probabilistic reasoning task or the attributional style task. Conclusions: Mentalizing errors may contribute to the development and maintenance of persecutory delusions in SLP. These patients do not appear to show the wider range of cognitive biases described in deluded patients with schizophrenia with onset in younger adult life. Key Words: Very late-onset schizophrenia-like psychosis • cognitive models • theory of mind This article has been cited by other articles: E. W. Twamley and P. D. Harvey The Importance of Cognition in the Conceptualization of both Dementia and Severe Mental Illness in Older People. Am J Geriatr Psychiatry, May 1, 2006; 14(5): 387 - 390. Further details

Moore, T., NORMAN, P., HARRIS, P., & Makris, M. (2006). Cognitive appraisals and psychological distress following venous thromboembolic disease: An application of the theory of cognitive adaptation. Social Science and Medicine, 63, 2395-2406. Venous thrombosis is a common and life-threatening disease that has received little attention in health psychology. The present study applied the theory of cognitive adaptation (TCA) to examine patients’ reactions to venous thrombosis. Patients (N=123) aged 16–84 recruited from anticoagulation units in the north of England completed measures of TCA constructs (meaning, mastery, self-esteem and optimism) and various outcome variables (anxiety, depression, thrombosis worries and quality of life) within 1 month of their thrombosis. The TCA explained large and significant amounts of variance in the outcome variables. In line with expectations, mastery, self-esteem and optimism were associated with positive adjustment. However, meaning was associated with elevated levels of distress. The results are discussed in relation to the search for meaning and the use of different control strategies in the early phases of adaptation to thrombosis. Further details

Moore, T. J., NORMAN, P., & HARRIS, P. R. (2006). Cognitive appraisals as predictors of psychological distress following venous thromboembolic disease: An application of the theory of cognitive adaptation. Social Science and Medicine, 63, 2395-2406.

Nachreiner, F., NICKEL, P., & Meyer, I. (2006). Human factors in process control systems: The design of human-machine interfaces. Safety Science, 44, pp 5-26.

Neal, A., & Griffin, M. A. (2006). A longitudinal study of the relationships among, safety climate, safety behavior, and accidents at the individual and group levels. Journal of Applied Psychology, 91, 946-953. Further details

Neale, M., & Griffin, M. A. (2006). A model of self-held work roles and role transitions. Human Performance, 19, 23-41.

NORMAN, P., & Conner, M. (2006). The theory of planned behaviour and binge drinking: Assessing the moderating role of past behaviour within the theory of planned behaviour. British Journal of Health Psychology, 11, 55-70.

O'Connor, R. C., ARMITAGE, C. J., & Gray, L. (2006). Theory of planned behaviour and parasuicide: The role of clinical and social cognitive variables. British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 45, 465 - 481. Further details

Offord, R. E., HARDY, G. E., Lamers, C., & Bergin, L. (2006). Teaching, teasing, flirting and fighting: A study of interactions between participants in a psychotherapeutic group for people with dementia. Dementia, 5, 167-195.

Pantke, R., & SLADE, P. (2006). Remembered Parenting Style and Psychological Wellbeing in Young Adults who's Parents had Experienced Early Child Loss. Psychology and Psychotherapy, Theory Research and Practice, 79, 69-81.

PARKER, S. K., Williams, H., & Turner, N. (2006). Modeling the antecedents of proactive behavior at work. . Journal of Applied Psychology, 91, 636-652.

Prescott, T. J., Montes-Gonzalez, F., Gurney, K., Humphries, M. D., & Redgrave, P. (2006). A robot model of the basal ganglia: Behavior and intrinsic processing. Neural Networks, 19, 31-61. Further details

Prescott, T. J., Newton, L. D., Mir, N. U., & Parks, R. W. (2006). A new dissimilarity measure for finding semantic structure in category fluency data with implications for understanding memory organization in schizophrenia. Neuropsychology, 20, 685-699. Further details

Rafferty, A. E., & Griffin, M. A. (2006). Perceptions of organizational change: A stress and coping perspective. Journal of Applied Psychology, 91, 1154-1162. Further details

Rafferty, A. E., & Griffin, M. A. (2006). Refining individualized consideration: Differentiating supportive leadership and developmental leadership. Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, 79, 37-61.

Redgrave, P., & Gurney, K. (2006). The short-latency dopamine signal: a role in discovering novel actions? Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 7, 967-975. Further details

Rivis, A., SHEERAN, P., & ARMITAGE, C. J. (2006). Augmenting the theory of planned behaviour with the prototype/willingness model: Predictive validity of actor versus abstainer prototypes for adolescents' health-protective and health-risk intentions. British Journal of Health Psychology, 11, 483-500. Further details

Robinson, E. R., Rowley, M. G., Beck, S. R., CARROLL, D. J., & Apperly, I. A. (2006). Children's sensitivity to their own relative ignorance: Handling of possibilities under conditions of epistemic and physical uncertainty. Child Development, 77(6), 1642-1655.

Robinson, M., Sparrow, P., CLEGG, C., & BIRDI, K. (2006). Forecasting future competency requirements: A three-phase methodology. Personnel Review.

Rowe, R., Maughan, B., & Eley, T. C. (2006). Links between antisocial behaviour and depressed mood: The role of life events and attributional style. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology.

Sheppard, L., EISER, C., Carney, S., Wright, N., Stoner, A., Ross, R., et al. (2006). Growth Hormone Treatment for Quality of Life in children. Hormone Research, 65, 243-249.

Sheppard, L., EISER, C., Carney, S., Wright, N., Stoner, A., Ross, R., et al. (2006). Growth Hormone Treatment for Quality of Life in children: Methodological Issues. Hormone Research, 65, 250-252.

Shipton, H., West, M. A., Dawson, J., Patterson, M., & BIRDI, K. (2006). HRM as a predictor of innovation. . Human Resource Management Journal, 16(1), 3-27. Further details

SIEGAL, M., & Varley, R. (2006). Aphasia, language and theory of mind. Social Neuroscience, 1, 167-174.

Sillence, E., Briggs, P., HARRIS, P. R., & Fishwick, L. (2006). A framework for understanding trust factors in web based health advice. International Journal of Human Computer Studies, 64, 697-713.

Simpson, J., Carter, S., Anthony, S. A., & OVERTON, P. G. (2006). Is disgust a heterogeneous emotion? Motivation and Emotion.

Simpson, J., Carter, S., Anthony, S. A., & Overton, P. G. (2006). Is disgust a heterogeneous emotion? . Motivat. Emot, 30, 31-41.

Sklavos, S., Dimitrova, D. M., Goldberg, S. J., PORRILL, J., & DEAN, P. (2006). Long time-constant behavior of the oculomotor plant in barbiturate-anesthetized primate. Journal of Neurophysiology, 95(2), 774-782.

SLADE, P. (2006). Towards a conceptual framework for understanding posttraumatic stress symptoms following childbirth and implications for further research. Journal Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

SLADE, P., Laxton-Kane, M., & Spiby, H. (2006). Smoking in pregnancy: The role of the transtheoretical model and mothers' attachment to the fetus. . Addictive Behaviours, 31, 743-757.

SPRIGG, C. A., & Jackson, P. R. (2006). Call centres as lean service environments: Well-being and the mediating role of work design. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 11, 197-212.

SPRIGG, C. A., & Jackson, P. R. (2006). Call centers as lean service environments: Job-related strain and the mediating role of work design. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 11, 197-212.

Stafford, T., & Gurney, K. (2006). Biologically constrained action selection improves cognitive control in a model of the Stroop task. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society Series B, Special issue on modelling action selection.

Stafford, T., & Wilson, S. P. (2006). Self-organisation can generate the discontinuities in the somatosensory map. Neurocomputing.

Stiles, W. B., Leiman, M., Shapiro, D. A., HARDY, G. E., Barkham, M., Detert, N., et al. (2006). What does the first exchange tell? Dialogical sequence analysis in very brief therapy. Psychotherapy Research, 16, 408-421.

TURPIN, G., Hope, H., Duffy, R., Fossey, M., & Seward, J. (2006). Improving Access to Psychological Therapies: Implications for the Mental Health Workforce. Journal of Mental Health Workforce Development, 1, 7-15.

Upton, P., & EiSER, C. (2006). School experiences after treatment for a brain tumour. Child: Care, Health and Development, 32, pp 9-17.

Wallace, S., Coleman, M., PASCALIS, O., & Bailey, A. (2006). A study of impaired judgement of eye gaze direction and related face processing deficits in autism and Asperger's syndrome. Perception, 35, 1651-1664.

WEBB, T. L. (2006). Getting things done: Self-regulatory processes in goal pursuit. Social Psychological Review, 8, 2-13.

Webb, T. L., & Sheeran, P. (2006). Does changing behavioural intentions engender behavior change? A meta-analysis of the experimental evidence. Psychological Bulletin, 132, 249-268. Further details

White, S., Frith, U., MILNE, E., Rosen, S., Swettenham, J., & Ramus, F. (2006). A double dissociation between sensorimotor impairments and reading disability: A comparison of autistic and dyslexic children. Cognitive Neuropsychology, 23, 748-761. Further details

White, S., MILNE, E., Rosen, S., Hansen, P., Swettenham, J., Frith, U., et al. (2006). The role of sensorimotor processing in dyslexia: a multiple case study of dyslexic children. Developmental Science, 9, 237-269. This study attempts to investigate the role of sensorimotor impairments in the reading disability that characterizes dyslexia. Twenty-three children with dyslexia were compared to 22 control children, matched for age and non-verbal intelligence, on tasks assessing literacy as well as phonological, visual, auditory and motor abilities. The dyslexic group as a whole were significantly impaired on phonological, but not sensorimotor, tasks. Analysis of individual data suggests that the most common impairments were on phonological and visual stress tasks and the vast majority of dyslexics had one of these two impairments. Furthermore, phonological skill was able to account for variation in literacy skill, to the exclusion of all sensorimotor factors, while neither auditory nor motor skill predicted any variance in phonological skill. Visual stress seems to account for a small proportion of dyslexics, independently of the commonly reported phonological deficit. However, there is little evidence for a causal role of auditory, motor or other visual impairments. Further details

Williams, H., PARKER, S. K., & Turner, N. (2006). Perceived dissimilarity and perspective taking within work teams. Group and Organization Management.

Williams, P., HARDY, G., & TURPIN, G. (2006). Clinical psychology and the diversity of service provision in the UK: A review of the literature. Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, 13, 324-338. There is substantial evidence to suggest that clinical psychology services are failing to meet the psychological and clinical needs of people from minority ethnic groups. This paper reviews current knowledge and understanding of factors that may be contributing to this, by examining the diversity of clinical psychology service provisions for minority ethnic groups in the United Kingdom (UK). Research that focuses on the poor utilization of clinical psychology services by minority ethnic groups is identified, and this is related to the limitations offered by mainstream psychological services. References to developments from abroad are also included where they enhance understanding of the current situation affecting minority ethnic groups in the UK. The findings show that minority ethnic groups are generally marginalized and excluded from mainstream clinical psychology services on a number of different levels. These are often influenced by referral conventions, professional misunderstandings of psychological distress and an over-reliance on ethnocentric and eurocentric conceptual frameworks. Cultural factors are also implicated. This review illustrates that the profession needs to be more considerate in its provision of services for minority ethnic users and indelible steps taken to increase the accessibility and credibility of clinical psychology services to Black and other minority ethnic groups. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Further details

Williams, P., HARDY, G. E., & TURPIN, G. (2006). Clinical Psychology Service Provision and Ethnic Diversity within the UK: A review of the literature. Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, 13(5), 324-338.

Yadzi, A. A., German, T. P., Defeyer, M., & SIEGAL, M. (2006). Competence and performance in belief-desire reasoning across two cultures: The truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth about false belief? Cognition, (100), 343-368.

ABSOLOM, K., Greenfield, D., Ross, R., Davies, H., Hancock, B., & EISER, C. (2007). Reassurance following breast screening recall for female survivors of Hodgkin's lymphoma. The Breast, 16, 590-596. Female survivors of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) treated with mantle radiotherapy experience increased breast cancer risk related to radiation dose and age at diagnosis. In 2003, the Department of Health (DoH) in the UK recalled patients to explain this risk and offer screening. The aims of this paper are to describe women's emotional responses and knowledge of their personal risk following the recall. Women were interviewed before risk counselling and breast screening (Time 1, n=56) and again following screening and results (Time 2, n=50). Questionnaire measures of quality of life, anxiety, depression and cancer worries were completed at Time 2. No cases of breast cancer were identified. After the recall, 64% had learned more about late effects and 76% were reassured about their health. All but one woman intended to attend future screening. Women are keen to take advantage of screening and experience relatively little distress. Further details

ANDRADE, J., & Donaldson, L. (2007). Evidence for an olfactory store in working memory? Psychologia: special issue on working memory. Further details

ARMITAGE, C. J. (2007). Effects of an implementation intention-based intervention on fruit consumption. Psychology & Health, 22, 917-928. Further details

ARMITAGE, C. J. (2007). Changing past behavior without means of a time machine: Effects on future behavioral decisions. Social Cognition, 25, 761-777. Further details

ARMITAGE, C. J., & Arden, M. A. (2007). Felt and potential ambivalence across the stages of change. Journal of Health Psychology, 12, 149-158. Further details

Axtell, C., Parker, S., Holman, D., & TOTTERDELL, P. (2007). Enhancing customer service: Perspective taking in a call center. European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology., 16, 141-168.

BARKHAM, M., Mullin, T., Leach, C., Stiles, W. B., & Lucock, M. (2007). Stability of the CORE-OM and BDI-I: Psychometric properties and implications for routine practice. Psychology & Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice, 80, 269-278.

BEAIL, N., Kellett, S., Newman, D. W., & Warden, S. (2007). The dose effect relationship in psychodynamic psychotherapy with people with intellectual disabilities. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 20, 448-454.

BERRY, K. (2007). Psychology services in psychiatric rehabilitation: Service user needs and staff perceptions. Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice., 14, 244-248.

BERRY, K., Band, R., Corcoran, R., Barrowclough, C., & Wearden, A. (2007). Attachment styles, interpersonal relationships and schizotypy in a non-clinical sample. Psychology and Psychotherapy, 80, 563-576.

BERRY, K., Barrowclough, C., & Wearden, A. (2007). A review of the role of adult attachment style in psychosis: Unexplored issues and questions for further research. Clinical Psychology Review, 24, 458-475.

BERRY, K., Drake, R., Stewart, C., Aitkin, L. M., Byrne, J., Barrowclough, C., et al. (2007). Orofacial dyskinesia, frontal lobe dysfunction and coping in older people with psychosis. American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 15, 800-806.

BERRY, K., & Poorhardy, R. (2007). Implementing routine outcome measures in a psychiatric rehabilitation setting. International Journal of Psychiatric Rehabilitation Research, 30, 347-349.

BERRY, K., Wearden, A., & Barrowclough, C. (2007). Adult attachment styles and psychosis: An investigation of associations between general attachment styles and attachment relationships with specific others. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 42, 972-976.

Birchwood, M., Trower, P., Brunet, K., Gilbert, P., IQBAL, Z., & Jackson, C. (2007). Social anxiety and the shame of psychosis: A study in First Episode Psychosis. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 45, 1025 - 1037.

Bogacz, R., & Gurney, K. (2007). The basal ganglia and cortex implement optimal decision making between alternative actions. Neural Computation, 19, 442-477. Further details

Christian, J., ARMITAGE, C. J., & Abrams, D. (2007). Evidence that theory of planned behaviour variables mediate the effects of sociodemographic variables on homeless people's participation in service programs. Journal of Health Psychology, 12, 805-817. Further details

Clarke, S. A., & EISER, C. (2007). Health behaviours of survivors of childhood cancer and interventions to improve healthy lifestyles. A systematic review. European Journal of Cancer, 43(9), 1373-1384. Aim To review (1) prevalence and predictors of risk behaviours especially smoking and (2) values of interventions to reduce risk behaviours in childhood cancer survivors. Method A systematic search of four databases (OVID Medline (1966 to May week 2, 2006), CINAHL, EMBASE, and Pubmed (US Library of Medicine and National Institute of Health)) for articles published between January 1990 and May 2006. Results Twenty-three eligible articles. Incidence of risk behaviours are comparable with, or lower than the general population and controls. Socio-demographic (age, socio-economic status, diagnosis, ethnic group) and psychological variables (perceived vulnerability) predict risk behaviour. Improved knowledge and awareness of vulnerability have been found after interventions, but no changes in health behaviours. Conclusion This review illustrates an optimistic picture of low participation in substance use amongst survivors, although based mainly on smoking. However, smoking might not be the major problem for survivors and attention must also be directed to other health behaviours including exercise and healthy diet. Further details

Clarke, S. A., EISER, C., & Sheppard, L. (2007). Mothers communication of past health and future risks to survivors of childhood cancer. Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry. Mothers of survivors of Retinoblastoma (Rb) experience unique challenges communicating with their child about the condition. Children are mostly diagnosed within their first year but the consequences continue into young adult life. Here 39 mothers of Rb survivors (23 males, mean age = 10.26 years) were interviewed about their experiences. Mothers were asked about communication with their children about Rb, and future health risks. Interviews were analysed using thematic analysis. Mothers reported that they had informed children about past diagnosis and treatment but had spoken less about genetic risk or risk of secondary cancer. The child's age and information-seeking behaviour were associated with mothers' disclosure, along with mothers' perceptions that information would facilitate child coping. Findings suggest that mothers may need more guidance during follow-up care in communicating about the disease and its consequences for future health. Medical staff should also take extra care to ensure that mothers are aware of genetic counselling services and how to access them before the child is discharged from specialist care. Further details

COIZET, V., Overton, P. G., & REDGRAVE, P. (2007). Collateralization of the tectonigral projection with other major output pathways of superior colliculus in the rat. J. Comp. Neurol, 500, 1034-1049.

Connell, J., BARKHAM, M., & Mellor-Clark, J. (2007). Mental health CORE-OM norms of students attending university counselling services benchmarked against an age-matched primary care sample. British Journal of Guidance & Counselling, 35, 41-56.

Connell, J., BARKHAM, M., Stiles, W. B., Twigg, E., Singleton, N., Evans, O., et al. (2007). Distribution of CORE-OM scores in a general population, clinical cut-off points, and comparison with the CIS-R. British Journal of Psychiatry, 190, 69-74.

Cooper, M., & TURPIN, G. (2007). Clinical Psychology Trainees' Research Productivity and Publications: An Initial Survey and Contributing Factors. Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, 14, 54-62.

Cremeens, J., EISER, C., & BLADES, M. (2007). Assessing the impact of scale type, types of items, and age on the measurement of school age children's self-report quality of life. Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 32, 132-138.

DAVIES, J. (2007). Working with Personality Disordered Offenders: Where are we at and where do we need to go? Issues in Forensic Psychology, 6, 40-46.

DAVIES, J., Howells, K., & Jones, L. (2007). Using single case approaches in personality disorder and forensic services. Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology, 18(3), 353-367.

DAVIES, J., & O'Meara, A. (2007). 'I consider myself sadistic': A qualitiative analysis of sadistic endorsement in a group of Irish undergraduates. British Journal of Forensic Practice, 9(1), 24-30.

Devonshire, I. M., Mayhew, J. E. W., & Overton, P. G. (2007). Cocaine preferentially enhances sensory processing in the upper layers of the primary sensory cortex. Neuroscience, 146, 841-851.

Dommett, E. J., Simpson, J., Clark, D., & Overton, P. G. (2007). Identification of a excitatory amino acid mediated component of the ventral tegmental area local field potential response induced by medial prefrontal cortex stimulation: effect of acute d-amphetamine. J. Neural Transm, 114, 161-172.

Drew, A., Baird, G., Taylor, E., MILNE, E., & Charman, T. (2007). Developmental change in non-verbal communication in toddlers with autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 37, 648-666. The Social Communication Assessment for Toddlers with Autism (SCATA) was designed to measure non-verbal communication, including early and atypical communication, in young children with autism spectrum disorder. Each communicative act is scored according to its form, function, role and complexity. The SCATA was used to measure communicative ability longitudinally in two samples of toddlers with autism spectrum disorder. Overall frequency of non-verbal communicative acts did not change between the two assessments. However, the form and complexity, the function and the role the child took in the interaction did change with time. Both frequency and function of communicative acts in toddlerhood were positively associated with later language ability: social acts, comments and initiations showed greater predictive association than requests and responses. Further details

Earle, E. A., Clarke, S. A., EISER, C., & Sheppard, L. (2007). 'Building a new normality'- Mothers experiences of caring for a child with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia. Child: Care Health and Development, 33(2), 155-160. Further details

Edwards, C. R., THOMPSON, A. R., & Blair, A. (2007). An 'Overwhelming Illness': Women's Experiences of Learning to Live with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis. Journal of Health Psychology, 12(2), 203-214.

EISER, C., ABSOLOM, K., Greenfield, D., Snowden, J., Coleman, R., Hancock, B., et al. (2007). Follow-up care for young adult survivors of cancer: Lessons from Pediatrics. Journal of Cancer Survivorship: Research and Practice, 1, 75-86. Introduction Recent advances in treatment of childhood cancer have resulted in overall survival rates approaching 75%, but approximately two-thirds experience late-effects related to the disease or treatment. Consequently, recommendations for comprehensive follow-up have been made. As the number of survivors of adult cancers increase, similar concerns about how to provide follow-up and achieve optimal quality of life are being raised. In this paper we propose that management of cancer survivors diagnosed in young adulthood (18-45 years) could benefit from experience gained treating survivors of childhood cancer. Materials and methods We reviewed research relating to differences in survival rates and late-effects; current arrangements for follow-up; effectiveness; and problems in organization of follow-up separately for survivors of child and adult cancers. Results A number of models of follow-up were identified. Rationale for follow-up included early identification and treatment of second cancer and late-effects, health promotion and screening. Increasing numbers of survivors and range of late-effects were identified as problems in organizing services. A possible solution is risk-stratified follow-up, currently being developed in pediatrics. Conclusions New models of follow-up are needed that take account of financial costs for health services and survivors' concerns about their current and future health. Implications for continuing refinement of treatment protocols must be an integral part of the service. Implications for cancer survivors International standards are needed to ensure all survivors have access to expert follow-up care and can benefit from new information that might lead to earlier treatment of late-effects. Further details

Elliot, M. A., ARMITAGE, C. J., & Baughan, C. J. (2007). Using the theory of planned behaviour to predict observed driving behaviour. British Journal of Social Psychology, 46, 69-90. Further details

Ferguson, E., Frances, C. R., Abraham, C., Ditto, B., & SHEERAN, P. (2007). Improving blood donor recruitment and retention: Integrating theoretical advances from the social and behavioral science agendas. Transfusions, 47, 1999-2010. Background: Increasing blood donor recruitment and retention is of key importance to transfusion services. Research within the social and behavioral science traditions has adopted separate but complementary approaches to addressing these issues. This article aims to review both of these types of literature, examine theoretical developments, identify commonalities, and offer a means to integrate these within a single intervention approach. Study Design and Methods: The social and behavioral science literature on blood donor recruitment and retention focusing on theory, interventions, and integration is reviewed. Results: The role of emotional regulation (anticipated anxiety and vasovagal reactions) is central to both the behavioral and the social science approaches to enhancing donor motivation, yet although intentions are the best predictor of donor behavior, interventions targeting enactment of intentions have not been used to increase donation. Implementation intentions (that is, if-then plans formed in advance of acting) provide a useful technique to integrate findings from social and behavioral sciences to increase donor recruitment and retention. Conclusion: After reviewing the literature, implementation intention formation is proposed as a technique to integrate the key findings and theories from the behavioral and social science literature on blood donor recruitment and retention. Further details

Fife-Schaw, C., SHEERAN, P., & NORMAN, P. (2007). Simulating behaviour change interventions based on the theory of planned behaviour: Impacts on intention and action. British Journal of Social Psychology, 46, 43-68. The theory of planned behaviour (TPB; Ajzen, 1991) has been used extensively to predict social and health behaviours. However, a critical test of the TPB is whether interventions that increased scores on the theory's predictors would engender behaviour change. The present research deployed a novel technique in order to provide this test. Statistical simulations were conducted on data for 30 behaviours (N=211) that estimated the impact of interventions that generated maximum positive changes in attitudes, subjective norms and perceived behavioural control (PBC) on subsequent intentions and behaviour. Findings indicated that interventions that maximized TPB variables had a substantial impact on behavioural intentions. Although TPB maximization increased the proportion of the sample that performed respective behaviours by 28% compared with baseline, the behaviour of a substantial minority of the sample (26%) did not change. The research also identified several interactions among TPB variables in predicting simulated intention and behaviour scores and investigated the mediating role of intentions in predicting behaviour. Further details

Gias, C., Jones, M., Keegan, D., Adamson, P., Greenwood, J., Lund, R., et al. (2007). Preservation of visual cortical function following retinal pigment epithelium transplantation in the RCS rat using optical imaging techniques. Eur J Neurosci, 25(7), 1940-1948. The aim of this study was to determine the extent of cortical functional preservation following retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) transplantation in the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat using single-wavelength optical imaging and spectroscopy. The cortical responses to visual stimulation in transplanted rats at 6 months post-transplantation were compared with those from age-matched untreated dystrophic and non-dystrophic rats. Our results show that cortical responses were evoked in non-dystrophic rats to both luminance changes and pattern stimulation, whereas no response was found in untreated dystrophic animals to any of the visual stimuli tested. In contrast, a cortical response was elicited in most of the transplanted rats to luminance changes and in many of those a response was also evoked to pattern stimulation. Although the transplanted rats did not respond to high spatial frequency information we found evidence of preservation in the cortical processing of luminance changes and low spatial frequency stimulation. Anatomical sections of transplanted rat retinas confirmed the capacity of RPE transplantation to rescue photoreceptors. Good correlation was found between photoreceptor survival and the extent of cortical function preservation determined with optical imaging techniques. This study determined the efficacy of RPE transplantation to preserve visual cortical processing and established optical imaging as a powerful technique for its assessment. Further details

Gilbody, S., Richards, D. A., & BARKHAM, M. (2007). Diagnosing depression in primary care using self-completed instruments: a UK validation of the PHQ-9 and CORE-OM. British Journal Of General Practice, 57, 650-652.

Godin, G., Conner, M., SHEERAN, P., & Germain, M. (2007). Determinants of repeated blood donation among new and experienced blood donors. Transfusions, 47, 1607-1615. Background: The maintenance of a safe level of blood supply is provided by a small number of volunteers, and their retention is difficult. The aim of this study was to identify factors predicting repeated blood donation among experienced and new donors. Study Design And Methods: A random sample of 2231 donors (2070 experienced and 161 new) completed a questionnaire assessing psychosocial factors as defined by the most prominent social cognitive theories. Six months later, an objective measure of frequency of registrations to give blood was obtained from the database of the local official agency for blood donation. Results: Logistic regression analysis indicated that for experienced donors, the predictors were intention, perceived control, anticipated regret, moral norm, age, and frequency of blood donation in the past. For new donors, intention and age were the only determinants of behavior. Important differences in the determinants of intention were also noted between experienced and new donors. Conclusion: In summary, the results of this study support the idea that distinct promotion strategies should be adopted to increase repeated blood donation among experienced versus new donors. Further details

HARRIS, P. R. (2007). The impact of perceived experience on likelihood judgments for self and others: An experimental approach. European Journal of Social Psychology, 37, 141-152. This study examines the effect of an experimental manipulation of perceived experience on self and others' likelihood ratings for a set of relatively commonplace misfortunes. Participants were randomly assigned to a condition in which they were asked whether they had ever experienced the events (designed to induce higher perceived experience) or whether they had done so frequently, typically, etc. (designed to induce lower perceived experience). The manipulation led to increases in ratings of both perceived self-likelihood and others' likelihood, in ease of imagining the outcome and recall of a past occurrence, and to decreases in perceived control over the events in the higher perceived experience condition. The increases in ease of imagining mediated the impact of manipulated experience on comparative likelihood whereas the decreases in perceived control did not. There was little evidence that event controllability moderated the impact of experience on comparative likelihood for these events. Further details

HARRIS, P. R., Mayle, K., Mabbott, L., & Napper, L. (2007). Self-affirmation reduces smokers' defensiveness to graphic on-pack cigarette warning labels. Health Psychology, 26, 437-446. OBJECTIVE: Little is known about how smokers respond to graphic images depicting the health consequences of smoking. The authors tested whether smokers respond defensively to such images and whether allowing them to self-affirm reduces their defensiveness. DESIGN: Young smokers (N = 87) were randomly allocated to self-affirm or perform a control task prior to viewing 4 images intended for future use on cigarette packs in the European Union. Measures were taken immediately postexposure and after 1 week. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Participants rated each image for threat and personal relevance. Once all 4 images had been viewed, they completed measures of intentions, self-efficacy, and perceived behavioral control for reducing cigarette consumption, negative thoughts and feelings about smoking, personal vulnerability to 6 smoking-related diseases, desire to quit, and plans to quit. At the 1-week follow-up, measures of self-reported smoking and desire to reduce consumption were taken. RESULTS: Relative to controls, self-affirmed participants rated the images as more threatening and personally relevant, and they reported more negative thoughts and feelings and higher levels of control, self-efficacy, and intentions. Risk level moderated the effect of self-affirmation on relevance and intentions: Self-affirmation increased ratings on both measures among those who smoked more. In addition, self-affirmation moderated the threat-intention relationship, which was weaker in the self-affirmed group. At follow-up, motivation to reduce consumption remained higher in self-affirmed participants, but there were no differences in reported consumption. CONCLUSION: Self-affirmation can promote less defensive responding even to visual material about well-established health risks such as smoking. Further details

Haywood, A., SLADE, P., & King, H. (2007). Psychosocial associates of premenstrual symptoms and the moderating role of social support in a community sample. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 62, 9-13.

Haywood, A., SLADE, P., & King, H. (2007). An examination of the association between postnatal distress and premenstual symptoms in a community sample. Journal of Affective Disorders, 99, 241-245.

Haywood, A., SLADE, P., & King, H. (2007). Factors affecting the well-being of women with young children: Exploring the relationship between post-natal depressive symptoms and Pre-menstrual Syndrome (PMS). . 2-5.

Huke, K., & SLADE, P. (2007). An exploratory investigation of the experiences of partners living with people who have bulimia nervosa. European Eating Disorders Review, 14, 436-447.

Humphries, M. D., & Gurney, K. (2007). A means to an end: validating models by fitting experimental data. Neurocomputing, 70, 1892-1896. Further details

Kelly, D. J., Liu, S., Ge, L., Quinn, P. C., Slater, A. M., Lee, K., et al. (2007). Cross-race preferences for same-race faces extend beyond the african versus caucasian contrast. Infancy, 11(1), 87-95. A standard visual preference task was used to examine 3-month-olds' looking times at own-race versus other-race faces as a function of environmental exposure to faces from the two categories. Participants were Caucasian infants living in a Caucasian environment, African infants living in an African environment, and African infants living in a predominantly Caucasian environment. The results indicate that preference for own-race faces is present as early as 3 months of age, but that this preference results from exposure to the prototypical facial environment. Further details

Kelly, D. J., Quinn, P. C., Slater, A. M., Lee, K., Ge, L., & PASCALIS, O. (2007). The other-race effect develops during infancy: Evidence of perceptual narrowing. Psychological Science. Experience plays a crucial role in the development of face processing. In the study reported here, we investigated how faces observed within the visual environment affect the development of the face-processing system during the 1st year of life. We assessed 3-, 6-, and 9-month-old Caucasian infants' ability to discriminate faces within their own racial group and within three other-race groups (African, Middle Eastern, and Chinese). The 3-month-old infants demonstrated recognition in all conditions, the 6-month-old infants were able to recognize Caucasian and Chinese faces only, and the 9-month-old infants' recognition was restricted to own-race faces. The pattern of preferences indicates that the other-race effect is emerging by 6 months of age and is present at 9 months of age. The findings suggest that facial input from the infant's visual environment is crucial for shaping the face-processing system early in infancy, resulting in differential recognition accuracy for faces of different races in adulthood. Further details

Langdridge, D., SHEERAN, P., & CONNOLLY, K., J. (2007). Analyzing additional variables in the theory of reasoned action. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 37, 1884-1913. This study examined the convergent, discriminant, and predictive validity of several variables proposed to augment the theory of reasoned action (TRA), using both principal components analysis (PCA)/multiple regression and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA)/structural equation modeling (SEM) among a sample of the UK population regarding their intention to have a child. PCA revealed good convergent and discriminant validity for attitude vs. anticipated regret, subjective norm vs. moral norm vs. social relations, but not for intention vs. desire or perceived behavioral control. Multiple regression analyses showed that the additional variables predicted a significant increment in the variance in intention. CFA, however, showed moderate convergent validity and poor discriminant validity and the structural model comprised the 2 predictors from the TRA only. Further details

Maio, G. R., Verplanken, B., Manstead, A. S. R., Stroebe, W., Abraham, S. C., SHEERAN, P., et al. (2007). Social psychological factors in lifestyle change and their relevance to policy. Social Issues and Policy Review, 1, 99-137. Crises in obesity and changes in the environment illustrate the need to change problematic behaviors and lifestyles in large segments of the population. This article uses social psychological theory and research to understand methods for facilitating lifestyle change. A basic assumption in the social psychological perspective is that the environment and the person interact to determine behavior. Both factors are important for understanding "upstream" and "downstream" approaches to lifestyle change (McKinlay, 1993; Verplanken & Wood, 2006) and consideration of one factor without the other may be disastrous. We review evidence from within and outside of the health context to illustrate the upstream and downstream approaches and then describe implications for public policy and intervention. The evidence and recommendations encompass a wide range of behaviors, ranging from speeding and intoxicated driving to eating an unhealthy diet and energy conservation. When armed with the relevant social psychological theory and evidence, lifestyle change campaigns are likely to be successful. Further details

Martinez-Iñigo, D., TOTTERDELL, P., Alcover, C., & Holman, D. (2007). Emotional labor and emotional exhaustion: Interpersonal and intrapersonal mechanismsc. Work & Stress, 21, 30-47.

MATTHEWS, D., Lieven, E., Theakston, A., & Tomasello, M. (2007). French children’s use and correction of weird word orders: A constructivist account. Journal of Child Language, 34, 381-409. Using the weird word order methodology (Akhtar, 1999), we investigated children's understanding of SVO word order in French, a language with less consistent argument ordering patterns than English. One hundred and twelve French children (ages 2;10 and 3;9) heard either high or low frequency verbs modelled in either SOV or VSO order (both ungrammatical). Results showed that: (1) children were more likely to adopt a weird word order if they heard lower frequency verbs, suggesting gradual learning; (2) children in the high frequency conditions tended to correct the ungrammatical model they heard to the closest grammatical alternative, suggesting different models activated different grammatical schemas; and (3) children were less likely to express the object of a transitive verb than were English children in an equivalent study, suggesting object expression is more difficult to master in French, perhaps because of its inconsistency in the input. These findings are discussed in the context of a usage-based model of language acquisition. Further details

MATTHEWS, D., Lieven, E., & Tomasello, M. (2007). How toddlers and preschoolers learn to uniquely identify referents for others: A training study. Child Development, 76(6), 1744-1759. This training study investigates how children learn to refer to things unambiguously. Two hundred twenty-four children aged 2.6, 3.6, and 4.6 years were pre- and posttested for their ability to request stickers from a dense array. Between test sessions, children were assigned to a training condition in which they (a) asked for stickers from an adult, (b) responded to an adult's requests for stickers, (c) observed 1 adult ask another for stickers, or (d) heard model descriptions of stickers. All conditions yielded improvements in referring strategies, with condition (a) being most effective. Four-year-olds additionally demonstrated learning effects in a transfer task. These results suggest that young children's communication skills develop best in response to feedback about their own attempts at reference. Further details

MAY, J., ANDRADE, J., Kavanagh, D., & Penfound, L. (2007). Imagery and strength of craving for eating, drinking and playing sport Cognition and Emotion. Further details

Meristo, M., Faulkman, K. W., Hjelmquist, E., Tedoldi, M., Surian, L., & SIEGAL, M. (2007). Language access and theory of mind reasoning: Evidence from deaf children in bilingual and oralist environments. Developmental Psychology, 43, 1156-1169.

Merriman, C., NORMAN, P., & Barton, J. (2007). Psychological correlates of PTSD symptoms following stroke. Psychology, Health and Medicine, 12, 592-602. This study assessed associations between a number of demographic, medical and psychological risk factors and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms following stroke. Individuals (N = 102) who had experienced a stroke within the previous year participated in the study. Participants completed questionnaires containing measures of PTSD symptoms and a range of psychological risk factors (i.e., anxiety, depression, negative affect, dissociation, cognitive appraisals). Regression analyses revealed the variables under consideration were able to explain large proportions of the variance in the number (R2 = .54, p < 0.001) and severity (R2 = .58, p < 0.001) of PTSD symptoms. Number of strokes, negative affect and cognitive appraisals emerged as significant predictors of both the number and severity of PTSD symptoms. The present findings suggest that a significant proportion of stroke patients may benefit from the detection and treatment of PTSD symptoms. Further details

Michie, S., Rothman, A., & SHEERAN, P. (2007). Advancing the science of behaviour change. Advancing the science of behaviour change. . Psychology and Health, 22, 249-253. Interventions to change health-related behaviours have had some success, but behaviour change has proved to be a formidable challenge. Substantial advances in efforts to improve the behavioral determinants of health will require renewed commitment to the science of behaviour. In particular, we believe there are three areas that would benefit from greater attention: (1) Refining theory, (2) methods, measurement, and mediation, and (3), designing theory-based interventions. Further details

MILNE, E., & Griffiths, H. J. (2007). Visual Perception and Visual Dysfunction in Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Literature Review. British and Irish Orthoptics Journal, 4, 15-20. Aim: To describe autistic spectrum disorder (ASD), and to review the evidence for associated visual dysfunction in the disorder. Method: An initial literature search was performed using Web of Science with the key words: autism and sensory; autism and vision; autism and visual; and autism and oculomotor. Papers which reported investigation of basic vision in autism were obtained, and any additional references listed in these articles that referred to other relevant data but did not emerge from the original search were followed up. Results: There is evidence that basic visual function may be affected in individuals with ASD. However, the mixed nature and limited number of empirical studies conducted make it difficult to draw clear conclusions as to specific deficits and areas of spared visual function in ASD. Conclusion: It is likely that patients with ASD may present to the orthoptic department. Specific vision screening of this population may be indicated, and further study based on large well-defined samples would be of significant value. Key words: Autistic spectrum disorder, Visual dysfunction, Visual perception

Mitchinson, B., Martin, C. J., Grant, R. A., & Prescott, T. J. (2007). Feedback control in active sensing: rat exploratory whisking is modulated by environmental contact. Royal Society Proceedings B, 274(1613). Further details

NIVEN, K., TOTTERDELL, P., & Holman, D. (2007). Changing moods and influencing people: The use and effects of emotional influence behaviours at HMP Grendon. Prison Service Journal, 173, 39-45.

NORMAN, P., ARMITAGE, C. J., & Quigley, C. (2007). The theory of planned behavior and binge drinking: Assessing the impact of binge drinker prototypes. Addictive Behaviors, 32, 1753-1768. The present study assessed the value of including prototype perceptions within the theory of planned behavior (TPB) when predicting young people's binge drinking intentions and behavior. Undergraduate students (N = 94) completed questionnaires assessing the main constructs of the TPB as well as measures of prototype evaluation and prototype similarity. Binge drinking behavior was assessed at one-week follow-up (N = 79). The TPB explained 58% of the variance in binge drinking intentions and 22% of the variance in binge drinking at one-week follow-up. The prototype perception measures explained additional variance in both binge drinking intentions (ΔR2 = .04) and behavior (ΔR2 = .09), although only prototype similarity emerged as a significant predictor. In addition, a significant interaction was found between prototype similarity and subjective norm in relation to the prediction of binge drinking behavior, suggesting that the perception of supportive norms may enhance the impact of prototype perceptions on health-risk behavior. The implications of the findings for interventions to encourage more appropriate drinking behavior are outlined. Further details

NORMAN, P., & Brain, K. (2007). Does dispositional optimism predict psychological responses to counseling for familial breast cancer? Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 63, 247-254. Objective The present study sought to assess the ability of dispositional optimism to predict the psychological responses of women with a family history of breast cancer who had been referred to counseling for familial breast cancer. Methods Women completed questionnaires prior to (n=735), immediately after (n=655), and 9 months after (n=545) attending counseling. Breast cancer risk status was assessed and communicated to the women in the clinics. Results Dispositional optimism was found to predict lower levels of anxiety and breast cancer worries immediately following counseling as well as lower levels of anxiety and perceived risk at 9-month follow-up, controlling for corresponding baseline scores. In addition, risk status moderated the optimism-perceived risk relationship, such that optimism was only predictive of lower risk perceptions among women at high risk. Conclusions Low levels of dispositional optimism may be considered to be a risk factor for adverse reactions to high breast cancer risk information. The implications of the findings for the clinical management of such reactions are discussed. Further details

Ononaiye, M. S. P., TURPIN, G., & Reidy, J. G. (2007). Attentional bias in social anxiety: Manipulation of stimulus duration and social-evaluative anxiety. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 31(6), 727-740. This study investigated the nature of pre-attentive and conscious attentional processing to different categories of threatening words in a non-clinical socially anxious sample. Individuals high (n = 41) and low (n = 41) in social avoidance and distress, as measured by the Social Avoidance and Distress Scale (SAD), performed a visual dot-probe task which included four word groups; negative evaluation, social situations, somatic sensation and physical threat. Participants completed masked trials (14 ms + masking for 486 ms), followed by unmasked trials (500 ms/no mask), under conditions of either social-evaluation or non-evaluation. The results showed that in the social-evaluation condition, high socially anxious individuals, in comparison to the low socially anxious, demonstrated an attentional bias towards masked physical threat words. There were no further attentional processing differences between the social anxiety groups to masked or unmasked stimuli, in either experimental condition. The results suggest that theories of social anxiety might need to accommodate biases to physical threat cues. Further details

Osatuke, K., Mosher, J. K., Goldsmith, J. Z., Stiles, W. B., Shapiro, D. A., HARDY, G. E., et al. (2007). Submissive voices dominate in depression: Assimilation analysis of a helpful session. Journal of Clinical Psychology: In Session, 63, 153-164.

Palmieri, G., Margison, F., Guthrie, E., Moorey, J., HARDY, G., Evans, C., et al. (2007). A preliminary study of a measure role-play competence in psychodynamic-interpersonal therapy. Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice, 80, 327-331.

POLIAKOFF, E., & Webb, T. L. (2007). What factors predict scientists' intentions to participate in public engagement of science events? Science Communication.

Prescott, T. J. (2007). Forced moves or good tricks in design space? Landmarks in the evolution of neural mechanisms for action selection. Adaptive Behavior, 15. Further details

Prescott, T. J., & Humphries, M. D. (2007). Who dominates who in the dark basements of the brain? Commentary on Merker, B. "Consciousness without a cerebral cortex: A challenge for neuroscience and medicine". Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 30, 104-105. Further details

Proctor, T., & BEAIL, N. (2007). Theory of mind and empathy in offenders with intellectual disabilities. Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities., 32, 82-93.

Quinn, P. C., Kelly, D. J., Lee, K., PASCALIS, O., & Slater, A. M. (2007). Preference for Attractive Faces in Human Infants Extends Beyond Conspecifics. Developmental Science. Human infants, just a few days of age, are known to prefer attractive human faces. We examined whether this preference is human-specific. Three- to 4-month-olds preferred attractive over unattractive domestic and wild cat (tiger) faces (Experiments 1 and 3). The preference was not observed when the faces were inverted, suggesting that it did not arise from low-level image differences (Experiments 2 and 3). In addition, the spontaneous preference for attractive tiger faces influenced performance in a recognition memory task involving attractive versus unattractive tiger face pairings (Experiment 4). The findings suggest that infant preference for attractive faces reflects the activity of general processing mechanisms rather than a specific adaptation to mate choice. Further details

Quinn, P. C., Uttley, L., Lee, K., Gibson, A., Smith, M., Slater, A. M., et al. (2007). Infant Preference for Female Faces Occurs for Same- but not Other-Race Faces. Journal of Neuropsychology, special issue on face processing. A standard visual preference task was used to examine 3-month-olds' looking times at own-race versus other-race faces as a function of environmental exposure to faces from the two categories. Participants were Caucasian infants living in a Caucasian environment, African infants living in an African environment, and African infants living in a predominantly Caucasian environment. The results indicate that preference for own-race faces is present as early as 3 months of age, but that this preference results from exposure to the prototypical facial environment. Further details

ROWE, R., Simonoff, E., & Silberg, J. (2007). Psychopathology, temperament, and unintentional injury: Cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 48(1), 71-79. Background: Growing evidence indicates a link between unintentional injury and both disruptive and emotional psychopathology. We present further evidence of these associations and address the underlying mechanisms. We also examine the genetic contribution to unintentional injury. Methods: The Virginia Twin Study of Adolescent Behavioral Development provides genetically informative multi-wave and multi-informant data regarding common psychopathology using the Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Assessment interview. The EASI temperament scales and child injury involvement were measured in parent-report questionnaires. Results: Unintentional injury showed significant genetic effects in girls and significant shared environmental effects in boys and girls. Symptoms of over-anxious disorder (OAD), and the EASI temperament scales were independently associated with injury. Longitudinal modeling showed impulsivity and OAD symptoms were related prospectively to injury involvement. Injuries did not increase risk for later impulsivity or OAD symptoms but were related prospectively to separation anxiety disorder symptoms. Conclusions: Impulsivity and OAD symptoms increased risk of later injury. We discuss the processes that may be involved in these relationships. Further details

Rudkin, A., Llewelyn, S., HARDY, G., Stiles, W. B., & BARKHAM, M. (2007). Therapist and client processes affecting assimilation and outcome in brief psychotherapy. Psychotherapy Research, 17, 613-621.

Saatsi, S., HARDY, G. E., & Cahill, J. (2007). Predictors of outcome and completion status in cogntive therapy for depression. Psychotherapy Research, 17, 189-200.

Scholes, C., TURPIN, G., & Mason, S. (2007). A randomised control trial to assess the effectiveness of providing self-help information to people with symptoms of acute stress disorder following a traumatic injury. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 45, 2527-2536. Background Patients attending accident and emergency (A&E) may develop long-term psychological difficulties. Psycho-education has been suggested to reduce the risk of post-injury disorders. Aims We tested the efficacy of providing self-help information to a high-risk sample. Methods A&E attenders were screened for acute stress disorder and randomised to two groups: patients (n=116) receiving a self-help booklet and those who did not (n=111). A sample of ‘low’ scorers was also included (n=120); they did not receive a booklet. Psychological assessments were completed at baseline (within 1 month post-injury) and 3 and 6 months post-injury. Results Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety and depression decreased (p Conclusions This trial failed to support the efficacy of providing self-help information, as a preventative strategy to ameliorate PTSD. Keywords: Trauma; Prevention; Self-help; Information; Acute stress disorder; Post-traumatic stress disorder Further details

Scott, L. S., PASCALIS, O., & Nelson, C. A. (2007). A Domain-General Theory of Perceptual Development. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 16(4), 197-201. In this article, we posit a domain-general principle that may account for the improvement that is observed in several aspects of perceptual development over the first years of life. Development during this time frame is characterized by a process of perceptual narrowing, whereby the discrimination of perceptual information is broadly tuned at first and then declines to more selective levels with experience. This process appears to cut across both the visual and auditory modalities and may reflect the development of a common neural architecture. Further details

Searle, A., NORMAN, P., Thompson, R., & Vedhara, K. (2007). Illness representations among patients with type 2 diabetes and their partners: Relationships with self-management behaviours. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 63, 175-184. Objective There is accumulating evidence to indicate that the illness representations of significant others are important for understanding patients' responses to chronic disease. The aims of the present study were to (a) assess the illness representations of patients with type 2 diabetes and their partners, (b) determine the extent of agreement between patient and partner representations, and (c) examine whether partners' representations mediate the relationships between patients' representations and their prospective self-management behaviors. Methods Patients' and partners' representations of diabetes were assessed with the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire [Moss-Morris R, Weinman J, Petrie K, Horne R, Cameron LD, Buick, D. The revised illness perception questionnaire (IPQ-R). Psychol Health 2002;17:116] at baseline (n=164). Self-management behaviors were assessed 12 months later with self-report measures of physical activity, medication, and a food frequency questionnaire. Results Patients scored lower on the illness coherence dimension, indicating that they reported a poorer understanding of the condition (t=−2.66, df=163, P=.009) relative to their partners. Patients demonstrated higher scores for personal control than their partners (t=2.01, df=163, P=.046). Mediational analyses indicated that partners' perceived timeline of diabetes partially mediated the relationship between patients' representations and their self-management behaviors including physical activity and dietary intake. In addition, partners' personal control representations partially mediated the relationship between patients' representations and physical activity. Conclusion It was demonstrated that patient–partner dyads generally share similar representations of type 2 diabetes and perceived control over the condition. Furthermore, there was evidence that partners' representations partially mediated the relationships between patients' representations and their prospective self-management behaviors. Further details

Searle, A., NORMAN, P., Thompson, R., & Vedhara, K. (2007). A prospective examination of illness beliefs and coping in patients with type 2 diabetes. British Journal of Health Psychology, 12, 621-638. Objective: According to the common-sense model of illness behaviour, illness representations are directly related to coping and, via coping, to adaptive or maladaptive outcomes. However, it may be more appropriate to conceptualize coping by assessing what patients actually do - i.e., their coping behaviours - rather than what they say they do in coping scales - i.e., their coping cognitions. The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between illness representations and the relative importance of coping cognitions and coping behaviours in the context of the management of type 2 diabetes. Design: The relationship between illness representations and coping variables was explored within a prospective design. Methods: The illness representations of 134 patients were assessed with the IPQ-R (Moss-Morris et al., 2002) along with coping cognitions and coping behaviours (medication, physical activity, diet). Results: Illness representations predicted coping cognitions and coping behaviours but coping cognitions did not mediate the relationships between illness representations and coping behaviours. Conclusion: The results demonstrate that illness representations are direct predictors of both coping cognitions and coping behaviours in patients with type 2 diabetes. In addition, coping cognitions and coping behaviours appear to be distinct mechanisms that operate independently. The findings suggest that rather than manipulating patients' coping cognitions to improve patients' health behaviours it may be beneficial to focus on their beliefs about diabetes. Further details

SHEERAN, P., Aubrey, R., & KELLETT, S. (2007). Increasing attendance for psychotherapy: Implementation intentions and the self-regulation of attendance-related negative affect. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 75, 853-863. The present study evaluated an implementation intention intervention that aimed to increase attendance at scheduled, initial appointments for psychotherapy by helping clients to manage negative feelings about attendance. Participants received a postal questionnaire that measured their views about attending psychotherapy. One half of the sample was randomly assigned to an implementation intention induction that was embedded in the questionnaire. Intention-to-treat analysis (N=390) indicated that participants who formed implementation intentions were more likely to attend compared to controls (75% vs. 63%), and this effect was even stronger among participants who returned the questionnaire (83% vs. 57%). Whereas anticipated affective costs (e.g., shame) had a negative impact on attendance for most participants, this effect was attenuated when participants formed implementation intentions and perceived that attendance would be beneficial. Thus, implementation intention formation can help clients to deal effectively with negative feelings that might otherwise prevent them attending their first psychotherapy appointment. Further details

Sillence, E., Briggs, P., HARRIS, P. R., & Fishwick, L. (2007). How do patients evaluate and make use of online health information? Going online for health advice: changes in usage and trust practices over the last five years, Interacting with Computers(19), 397-406. Increasing numbers of people are turning to the Internet for health advice despite reports that sites vary in terms of their quality. How do they decide whether or not to trust the advice they find online? A staged model of trust development is proposed and tested here in a longitudinal study in which fifteen women faced with decisions concerning the menopause and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) were observed while searching the Internet for information and advice over four consecutive weeks and then kept diaries over a six-month follow-up period. The women were all resident in the North-East of England and were recruited through advertisements in the local media. The study provided general support for a three-stage model of trust in which participants firstly engaged in rapid heuristic processing of information, efficiently sifting and rejecting general sales sites and portals but sometimes rejecting high-quality content because of poor design. Well-designed sites were then effectively interrogated for credible and personalized content before being designated trustworthy. The women appeared to act much like ‘scientists’ using web material to generate and test hypotheses and theories about HRT, although their capacity to deal with certain forms of risk information was limited. They subsequently reported integrating online advice with offline advice from friends, family and physicians in order to be fully confident in their final decisions. Women felt that the Internet influenced their decision-making and improved communications with physicians. Personalized stories from like-minded others improved trust perceptions. Despite the use of the Internet the physician was still seen as the primary source of information and advice. Further details

Sillence, E., Briggs, P., HARRIS, P. R., & Fishwick, L. (2007). Health websites that people can trust - the case of Hypertension. Interacting with Computers, Special Issue on 'Moving Face-to-Face Communication to Web-based Systems', 19, 32-42. Traditionally health advice has been anchored in face-to-face settings but increasingly patients are using the Internet for their health advice needs. This means that patients are now offered inconsistent advice from a range of sources and must determine which sites to trust and which to reject. To understand how consumers make these choices, 13 participants diagnosed with hypertension took part in a longitudinal study in which they searched for information and advice relevant to their condition. A content analysis of the group discussions revealed support for a staged model of trust in which mistrust or rejection of Websites is based on design factors and trust or selection of Websites is based on content factors such as source credibility and personalization. Based on this model, a set of guidelines for developing trust in health Websites is proposed and key differences between face-to-face communication and web-based systems are discussed. Further details

Simpson, J., Anthony, S. H., Schmeer, S., & Overton, P. G. (2007). Food-related contextual factors substantially modify the disgust response. Food Qual Pref., 18, 183-189.

SLADE, P., O'Neill, C., Simpson, A. J., & Lashen, H. (2007). The relationship between perceived stigma, disclosure patterns, support and distress in new attendees at an infertility clinic. Human Reproduction, 22(8), 2309-2317.

SPRIGG, C. A., ARMITAGE, C. J., & Hollis, K. (2007). Verbal abuse in the NHS: Impressions of the prevalence, perceived reasons for and relationships with staff psychological well-being. Emergency Medicine Journal, 24, 281-282. Further details

SPRIGG, C. A., STRIDE, C., WALL, T., HOLMAN, D. J., & Smith, P. R. (2007). Work characteristics, musculoskeletal disorders, and the mediating role of psychological strain: A study of call center employees. Journal of Applied Psychology, 92, 1456-1466.

Stafford, T., & Gurney, K. (2007). Biologically constrained action selection improves cognitive control in a model of the Stroop task. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 362 (Special issue on modelling action selection). Further details

Stafford, T., & Wilson, S. P. (2007). Self-organisation can generate the discontinuities in the somatosensory map. Neurocomputing, 70(10-12), 1932-1937. Further details

Stulz, N., Lutz, W., Leach, C., Lucock, M., & BARKHAM, M. (2007). Shapes of early change in psychotherapy under routine outpatient conditions. Journl of Consulting and Clinical Psychology., 75, 864-874.

Thomas, J., KNOWLES, R., Tai, S., & Bentall, R. P. (2007). Response styles to depressed mood in bipolar affective disorder. Journal of Affective Disorders, 100(1-3), 249-252. Background It has been hypothesised that dysfunctional strategies for avoiding depression play an important role in the pathway to mania. Support for this hypothesis comes from studies demonstrating that remitted and manic bipolar patients show similar cognitive biases to currently depressed patients. Method Manic patients, depressed bipolar patients, remitted bipolar patients and healthy controls were compared on an expanded version of Nolen-Hoeksema's [Nolen-Hoeksema, S., 1991. Responses to depression and their effects on the duration of depressed mood. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 100, 569–582.] Response Styles Questionnaire, measuring strategies for coping with depression. Results Manic patients reported greater use of active-coping and risk-taking compared to the depressed, remitted and healthy controls. Bipolar remitted patients reported greater rumination. Conclusions The findings are consistent with the hypothesis that mania is associated with dysfunctional strategies for regulating negative emotion. Further details

Webb, T. L., Christian, J., & ARMITAGE, C. J. (2007). Helping students turn up for class: Does personality moderate the effectiveness of an implementation intention intervention? Learning and Individual Differences. Class attendance is an important determinant of academic success yet a significant proportion of students miss class. The present study investigated the deliberative and personality correlates of class attendance alongside an implementation intention intervention that asked students to specify when, where, and how they would attend class. Class attendance was found to be a function of conscientiousness (more conscientious students were more likely to attend), openness to experience (more open students were less likely to attend), goal intentions (more motivated students were more likely to attend), and the implementation intention intervention (students who formed specific plans about when, where, and how to attend were more likely to attend). Furthermore, there was a significant interaction between the implementation intention intervention and conscientiousness; the intervention had a greater impact on class attendance for low or moderately conscientious students than for highly conscientious students. Further details

WEBB, T. L., & SHEERAN, P. (2007). How do implementation intentions promote goal attainment? A test of component processes. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology 43, 295-302. Implementation intentions are plans that specify the when, where, and how of goal striving in advance, and have been shown to enhance rates of goal attainment compared to merely forming respective goal intentions. The present research investigated whether the accessibility of the specified situation (cue accessibility) and the strength of the association between the specified situation and the intended response (cue–response linkage) explain the impact of implementation intentions on goal achievement. Findings indicated that participants who planned how to undertake a verbal task better attained their goal compared to participants who did not form a plan. Crucially, implementation intention effects were mediated by the accessibility of the specified cue and by the strength of cue–response links. These findings support the idea that implementation intentions benefit performance because control of behavior is delegated to specified situational cues that initiate action automatically. Further details

White, M. P., EISER, J. R., HARRIS, P. R., & Pahl, S. (2007). Who reaps the benefits, who bears the risks? Comparative optimism, comparative utility and regulatory preferences for mobile phone technology. Risk Analysis, 27, 741-753. Although the issue of risk target (e.g., self, others, children) is widely acknowledged in risk perception research, its importance appears underappreciated. To date, most research has been satisfied with demonstrating comparative optimism, i.e., lower perceived risk for the self than others, and exploring its moderators, such as perceived controllability and personal exposure. Much less research has investigated how the issue of target may affect benefit perceptions or key outcomes such as stated preferences for hazard regulation. The current research investigated these issues using data from a public survey of attitudes toward mobile phone technology (N= 1,320). First, results demonstrated comparative optimism for this hazard, and also found moderating effects of both controllability and personal exposure. Second, there was evidence of comparative utility, i.e., users believed that the benefits from mobile phone technology are greater for the self than others. Third, and most important for policy, preferences for handset regulation were best predicted by perceptions of the risks to others but perceived benefits for the self. Results suggest a closer awareness of target can improve prediction of stated preferences for hazard regulation and that it would be profitable for future research to pay more attention to the issue of target for both risk and benefit perceptions. Further details

Wilson, R., PASCALIS, O., & BLADES, M. (2007). Familiar face recognition in children with autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 37(2), 314-320. We investigated whether children with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) have a deficit in recognising familiar faces. Children with ASD were given a forced choice familiar face recognition task with three conditions: full faces, inner face parts and outer face parts. Control groups were children with developmental delay (DD) and typically developing (TD) children. Children with ASD and children with DD recognised slightly fewer faces than did TD children, but there was no ASD-specific deficit. All groups displayed the same pattern of face part superiority: full-face superiority over inner face, and inner face superiority over outer face. Therefore, the pattern of familiar face recognition by children with ASD was similar to the pattern found in other children. Further details

Achtziger, A., Gollwitzer, P. M., & SHEERAN, P. (2008). Implementation intentions and shielding goal striving from unwanted thoughts and feelings. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 34, 381-393. Forming an implementation intention or "if-then plan" promotes the attainment of different types of goals (Gollwitzer, 1999; Gollwitzer & Sheeran, 2006). So far, research on implementation intentions has focused on the initiation of goal striving, whereas the issue of shielding of ongoing goal striving has been largely neglected. In two field experiments concerned with dieting (Study 1) and athletic goals (Study 2), goal shielding was supported by implementation intentions geared at controlling potentially interfering inner states (i.e., cravings for junk food in Study 1, and disruptive thoughts, feelings, and physiological states in Study 2). In both experiments, forming if-then plans enhanced the rate of goal attainment. Thus, implementation intention formation can be used to promote the realization of desired outcomes not only by facilitating getting started with goal striving but also by preventing goal striving from straying off course. Further details

Arden, M. A., & ARMITAGE, C. J. (2008). Predicting and explaining transtheoretical model stage transitions in relation to condom-carrying behaviour. British Journal of Health Psychology, 13, 719-735. Objectives: The stages of change component of the transtheoretical model have been applied to safe sex behaviours in cross-sectional analyses, but have not yet been subject to prospective analysis. It was predicted that: (a) cross-sectional analyses would demonstrate good discrimination between the stages of change; (b) prospective analyses would allow for the identification of predictors of stage transitions; and (c) implementation intentions would explain progression from the preparation stage. Design: This study employed an experimental longitudinal design. Participants were randomly assigned to the experimental (implementation intention) or control conditions and completed questionnaires at baseline and at 2-month follow-up. Methods: Five hundred and twenty-five adolescents who were broadly representative of the UK population completed questionnaires at baseline and follow-up (N=393) measuring: demographic variables; stage of change; theory of planned behaviour constructs; anticipated regret; and moral norm in relation to condom-carrying behaviour. The experimental condition completed a self-generated implementation intention to carry condoms at the end of the baseline questionnaire. Results: Discriminant function analyses indicated that the stages of change could be accurately discriminated from one another cross-sectionally and that, longitudinally, the measured variables were able to predict transitions between most stages. Implementation intentions caused people to progress from the preparation stage. Conclusions: Transitions between most stages were reliably predicted, thereby providing potential targets for intervention. The brief implementation intention intervention was effective and could easily be utilized and expanded to encompass a broader range of sexual health behaviours. Further details

ARMITAGE, C. J. (2008). Cognitive and affective predictors of academic achievement in schoolchildren. British Journal of Psychology, 99, 57-74. The ability of the theory of planned behaviour to predict objectively measured outcomes was tested in school-age children. Study 1 (N = 71) showed that the theory of planned behaviour accounted for significant proportions of the variance in intention and that intentions predicted scores in a science test; Study 2 (N = 175) replicated these effects across a broader range of subjects. In addition, Study 2 explored the mechanism by which intention was translated into action and demonstrated that intention stability moderated the intention-academic achievement relationship. Moreover, controlling for a range of cognitive and affective variables, intention and positive affect were independent predictors of intention stability. The findings suggest that although positive affect did not influence intention directly, it did influence intention stability, the mechanism by which intentions are translated into action. Future educational interventions should therefore influence both cognitive and affective factors to promote sustained motivation. Further details

ARMITAGE, C. J., & Arden, M. A. (2008). How useful are the stages of change for targeting interventions? Randomized test of a brief intervention to reduce smoking. Health Psychology, 27, 789-798. Objectives: To see whether the stages of change are useful for targeting a brief intervention to reduce smoking based on implementation intentions. A second objective was to rule out demand characteristics as an alternative explanation for the findings of intervention studies based on the transtheoretical model and implementation intentions. Design: Participants (N = 350) were randomized to a passive control condition (questionnaire only), active control condition (questionnaire-plus-instruction to plan to quit) or experimental condition (questionnaire, plan to quit, form an implementation intention). Their behavior and psychosocial orientation to quit were measured at baseline and 2-month follow-up. Main Outcome Measures: Theory of planned behavior variables, nicotine dependence and quitting. Results: Significantly more people quit smoking in the experimental condition than in the control conditions, and the planning instructions changed intention to quit and perceived control over quitting, but not behavior. Stage of change moderated these effects such that implementation intentions worked best for individuals who were in the preparation stage at baseline. Conclusion: Harnessing both motivational and volitional processes seems to enhance the effectiveness of smoking cessation programs, although further work is required to clarify inconsistencies in the literature using the stages of change. Further details

ARMITAGE, C. J., HARRIS, P. R., Hepton, G., & Napper, L. (2008). Self-affirmation increases acceptance of health-risk information among adult smokers with low socioeconomic status. Psychology of Addictive Behaviours. This study reports an experiment designed to test whether self-affirmation can overcome defensive processing of risk information in a sample of UK adult smokers with low socioeconomic status. Participants (N = 57) were randomized to either a self-affirmation or control condition before reading a government-sponsored antismoking leaflet and completing measures of message acceptance, intention, and self-efficacy. Participants' subsequent behavior (taking leaflets) was recorded surreptitiously. Results showed that the manipulation significantly increased message acceptance, intention and behavior, and that the effects of the manipulation on behavior were mediated through message acceptance and intention. The practical and theoretical implications of the findings are discussed in relation to the possible use of self-affirmation manipulations to enhance the effectiveness of smoking cessation interventions. Further details

ARMITAGE, C. J., & Reidy, J. G. (2008). Use of mental simulations to change theory of planned behaviour variables. British Journal of Health Psychology, 13, 513-524. Objectives: The predictive validity of the theory of planned behaviour is well-established, but much less is known about: (a) whether there are causal relationships between key components of the model, and (b) how to go about changing theory of planned behaviour variables. This study tested the ability of outcome and process simulations to change variables specified in the theory of planned behaviour in relation to blood donation. Design: Participants (N = 146) were randomised to one of four conditions: Outcome simulation only, process simulation only, process-plus-outcome simulation and a distractor control condition. The dependent variables were state anxiety, and attitude, subjective norm and perceived control from the theory of planned behaviour. Methods: Participants were asked to empty their mind and visualise themselves: (a) after donating blood (outcome manipulation), (b) preparing to donate blood (process manipulation), (c) both preparing to donate blood and after having donated blood (process-plus-outcome manipulation), or (d) both preparing to get a high mark and after having got a high mark on their course (control condition). Following mental rehearsal participants completed the dependent variables. Results: There were no main effects of outcome simulation, but process simulation successfully increased intention, subjective norm and perceived control. There was also a significant outcome simulation x process simulation interaction for attitude. The effect of the process manipulation on intention was mediated by subjective norm and perceived control. Conclusions: The findings show promise for the use of mental simulations in changing cognitions and further research is required to extend the present findings to other health behaviours. Further details

Aspland, H., Llewelyn, S., HARDY, G., BARKHAM, M., & Stiles, W. B. (2008). Alliance ruptures and rupture resolution in cognitive-behaviour therapy: A preliminary task analysis. Psychotherapy Research, 18, 1-12. An initial ideal, rational model of alliance rupture and rupture resolution provided by cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) experts was assessed and compared with empirical observations of ruptures and their resolution in two cases of successful CBT. The initial rational model emphasized nondefensive acknowledgment and exploration of the rupture. Results indicated differences between what therapists think they should do to resolve ruptures and what they actually do and suggested that the rational model should be expanded to emphasize client validation and empowerment. Therapists' ability to attend to ruptures emerged as an important clinical skill. Further details

Ayers, S., Joseph, S., McKenzie-McHarg, K., SLADE, P., & K., W. (2008). Post traumatic stress following childbirth : Current issues and recommendations for future research. Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology 29, 240-250. Further details

Bannard, C., & MATTHEWS, D. (2008). Stored Word Sequences in Language Learning: The effect of familiarity on children’s repetition of four-word combinations. Psychological Science, 19, 241-248. Recent accounts of the development of grammar propose that children remember utterances they hear and draw generalizations over these stored exemplars. This study tested these accounts' assumption that children store utterances as wholes by testing memory for familiar sequences of words. Using a newly available, dense corpus of child-directed speech, we identified frequently occurring chunks in the input (e.g., sit in your chair) and matched them to infrequent sequences (e.g., sit in your truck). We tested young children's ability to produce these sequences in a sentence-repetition test. Three-year-olds (n= 21) and 2-year-olds (n= 17) were significantly more likely to repeat frequent sequences correctly than to repeat infrequent sequences correctly. Moreover, the 3-year-olds were significantly faster to repeat the first three words of an item if they formed part of a chunk (e.g., they were quicker to say sit in your when the following word was chair than when it was truck). We discuss the implications of these results for theories of language development and processing. Further details

BARKHAM, M., & Parry, G. (2008). Balancing rigour and relevance in guideline development for depression: The case for comprehensive cohort studies. Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice, 81, 399 - 417. PURPOSE: Clinical guidelines for the treatment of depression have not yet realized their potential for improving the delivery of the psychological therapies within national healthcare systems. Current guidelines emphasize treatment efficacy and issues in service delivery are relatively neglected. Hence, there is a hierarchy of evidence in which randomized efficacy trials are given primacy over naturalistic (i.e. practice-based) data. Such a strategy is inadequate to address important questions about best delivery of safe and acceptable psychological therapies and exacerbates divisions between research and practice communities. METHODS: Selected narrative review. RESULTS: Both randomized controlled trials and practice-based studies have shortcomings that can be ameliorated by the adoption of practical clinical trials embedded within large cohort studies - that is, comprehensive cohort studies. CONCLUSIONS: Comprehensive cohort studies have the potential to deliver an evidence base which is both rigorous and relevant. This could satisfy the scientific community as well as allowing practitioners and service users to be fully involved and committed to the process of collecting evidence and implementing guidance. We argue this would be a sound foundation upon which to build an evidence base upon which to develop future clinical guidelines for depression. Further details

BARKHAM, M., Stiles, W. B., Connell, J., Twigg, E., Leach, C., Lucock, M., et al. (2008). Effects of psychological therapies in randomized trials and practice-based studies. British Journal Clinical Psychology, 47, 397-415. Background: Randomized trials of the effects of psychological therapies seek internal validity via homogeneous samples and standardized treatment protocols. In contrast, practice-based studies aim for clinical realism and external validity via heterogeneous samples of clients treated under routine practice conditions. We compared indices of treatment effects in these two types of studies. Method: Using published transformation formulas, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scores from five randomized trials of depression (N = 477 clients) were transformed into Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation-Outcome Measure (CORE-OM) scores and compared with CORE-OM data collected in four practice-based studies (N = 4,196 clients). Conversely, the practice-based studies' CORE-OM scores were transformed into BDI scores and compared with randomized trial data. Results: Randomized trials showed a modest advantage over practice-based studies in amount of pre-post improvement. This difference was compressed or exaggerated depending on the direction of the transformation but averaged about 12%. There was a similarly sized advantage to randomized trials in rates of reliable and clinically significant improvement (RCSI). The largest difference was yielded by comparisons of effect sizes which suggested an advantage more than twice as large, reflecting narrower pre-treatment distributions in the randomized trials. Conclusions: Outcomes of completed treatments for depression in randomized trials appeared to be modestly greater than those in routine care settings. The size of the difference may be distorted depending on the method for calculating degree of change. Transforming BDI scores into CORE-OM scores and vice versa may be a preferable alternative to effect sizes for comparisons of studies using these measures. Further details

Bartlett, K., Saka, M., & Jones, M. (2008). Polarographic Electrode Measures of Cerebral Tissue Oxygenation: Implications for Functional Brain Imaging. Sensors, 8(12), 7649-7670. The changes in blood flow, blood volume and oxygenation that accompany focal increases in neural activity are collectively referred to as the hemodynamic response and form the basis of non-invasive neuroimaging techniques such as blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging. A principle factor influencing blood oxygenation, the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption is poorly understood and as such, data from imaging techniques are difficult to interpret in terms of the underlying neural activity. In particular how neurometabolic changes vary temporally, spatially and in magnitude remains uncertain. Furthermore knowledge of which aspects of neural activity are closely reflected by metabolic changes is essential for the correct interpretation of cognitive neuroscience studies in terms of information processing. Polarographic electrode measurements of cerebral tissue oxygenation in animal models following presentation of sensory stimuli have started to address these issues. Early studies demonstrated both increases and decreases in tissue oxygenation following neural activation. However a recent series of elegant studies in the cat visual system demonstrated a tight spatial and temporal coupling between evoked peri-synaptic activity and oxygen consumption following presentation of visual stimuli. Further details

Bentall, R. P., Kinderman, P., Howard, R., Blackwood, N., Cummins, S., Rowse, G., et al. (2008). Paranoid delusions in schizophrenia spectrum disorders and depression: The transdiagnostic role of expectations of negative events and negative self-esteem. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 196(5), 375-384. We aimed to identify transdiagnostic psychological processes associated with persecutory delusions. Sixty-eight schizophrenia patients, 47 depressed patients, and 33 controls were assessed for paranoia, positive and negative self-esteem, estimations of the frequency of negative, neutral, and positive events occurring to the self in the past and in the future and similar estimates for events affecting others in the future. Negative self-esteem and expectations of negative events were strongly associated with paranoia in all groups. Currently deluded patients were asked to rate whether their persecution was deserved on an analogue scale. Mean deservedness scores were higher in deluded-depressed patients than deluded-schizophrenia patients, but patients in both groups used the full range of scores. The findings indicate that negative self-esteem and negative expectations independently contribute to paranoia, but do not support a simple categorical distinction between poor-me (persecution undeserved) and bad-me (persecution deserved) patients. Further details

Berwick, J., Johnston, D., Jones, M., Martindale, J., Martin, C., Kennerley, A. J., et al. (2008). Fine detail of neurovascular coupling revealed by spatiotemporal analysis of the hemodynamic response to single whisker stimulation in rat barrel cortex. Journal of Neurophysiology, 99(2), 787-798. The spatial resolution of hemodynamic-based neuroimaging techniques, including functional magnetic resonance imaging, is limited by the degree to which neurons regulate their blood supply on a fine scale. Here we investigated the spatial detail of neurovascular events with a combination of high spatiotemporal resolution two-dimensional spectroscopic optical imaging, multichannel electrode recordings and cytochrome oxidase histology in the rodent whisker barrel field. After mechanical stimulation of a single whisker, we found two spatially distinct cortical hemodynamic responses: a transient response in the "upstream" branches of surface arteries and a later highly localized increase in blood volume centered on the activated cortical column. Although the spatial representation of this localized response exceeded that of a single "barrel," the spread of hemodynamic activity accurately reflected the neural response in neighboring columns rather than being due to a passive "overspill." These data confirm hemodynamics are capable of providing accurate "single-condition" maps of neural activity. Further details

Bewick, B., Mulhern, B., BARKHAM, M., Trusler, K., Hill, A. J., & Stiles, W. B. (2008). Changes in undergraduate student alcohol consumption as they progress through university. BMC Public Health, 19(8), 163. Background: Unhealthy alcohol use amongst university students is a major public health concern. Although previous studies suggest a raised level of consumption amongst the UK student population there is little consistent information available about the pattern of alcohol consumption as they progress through university. The aim of the current research was to describe drinking patterns of UK full-time undergraduate students as they progress through their degree course. Method: Data were collected over three years from 5895 undergraduate students who began their studies in either 2000 or 2001. Longitudinal data (i.e. Years 1–3) were available from 225 students. The remaining 5670 students all responded to at least one of the three surveys (Year 1 n = 2843; Year 2 n = 2219; Year 3 n = 1805). Results: Students reported consuming significantly more units of alcohol per week at Year 1 than at Years 2 or 3 of their degree. Male students reported a higher consumption of units of alcohol than their female peers. When alcohol intake was classified using the Royal College of Physicians guidelines [1] there was no difference between male and females students in terms of the percentage exceeding recommended limits. Compared to those who were low level consumers students who reported drinking above low levels at Year 1 had at least 10 times the odds of continuing to consume above low levels at year 3. Students who reported higher levels of drinking were more likely to report that alcohol had a negative impact on their studies, finances and physical health. Consistent with the reduction in units over time students reported lower levels of negative impact during Year 3 when compared to Year 1. Conclusion: The current findings suggest that student alcohol consumption declines over their undergraduate studies; however weekly levels of consumption at Year 3 remain high for a substantial number of students. The persistence of high levels of consumption in a large population of students suggests the need for effective preventative and treatment interventions for all year groups. Further details

Bewick, B., Trusler, K., BARKHAM, M., Hill, A. J., Cahill, J., & Mulhern, B. (2008). The effectiveness of web-based interventions designed to decrease alcohol consumption: a systematic review. Preventive Medicine, 47, 17-26. Objective. To review the published literature on the effectiveness of web-based interventions designed to decrease consumption of alcohol and/ or prevent alcohol abuse. Method. Relevant articles published up to, and including, May 2006 were identified through electronic searches of Medline, PsycInfo, Embase, Cochrane Library, ASSIA, Web of Science and Science Direct. Reference lists of all articles identified for inclusion were checked for articles of relevance. An article was included if its stated or implied purpose was to evaluate a web-based intervention designed to decrease consumption of alcohol and/or to prevent alcohol abuse. Studies were reliably selected and quality-assessed, and data were independently extracted and interpreted by two authors. Results. Initial searches identified 191 articles of which 10 were eligible for inclusion. Of these, five provided a process evaluation only, with the remaining five providing some pre- to post-intervention measure of effectiveness. In general the percentage quality criteria met was relatively low and only one of the 10 articles selected was a randomized control trial. Conclusion. The current review provides inconsistent evidence on the effectiveness of eIectronic screening and brief intervention (eSBI) for alcohol use. Process research suggests that web-based interventions are generally well received. However further controlled trials are needed to fully investigate their efficacy, to determine which elements are keys to outcome and to understand if different elements are required in order to engage lowand high-risk drinkers. Further details

Bewick, B., Trusler, K., Mulhern, B., BARKHAM, M., & Hill, A. J. (2008). The feasibility and effectiveness of a web-based personalised feedback and social norms alcohol intervention in UK university students: A randomized control trial Addictive Behaviors, 33, 1192-1198. Objective: Alcohol misuse amongst University students is a serious concern, and research has started to investigate the feasibility of using e-health interventions. This study aimed to establish the effectiveness of an electronic web-based personalised feedback intervention through the use of a randomised control trial (RCT). Methods: 506 participants were stratified by gender, age group, year of study, self-reported weekly consumption of alcohol and randomly assigned to either a control or intervention condition. Intervention participants received electronic personalised feedback and social norms information on their drinking behaviour which they could access by logging onto the website at any time during the 12-week period. CAGE score, average number of alcoholic drinks consumed per drinking occasion, and alcohol consumption over the last week were collected from participants at pre- and post-survey. Results: A significant difference in pre- to post-survey mean difference of alcohol consumed per occasionwas found, with those in the intervention condition displaying a larger mean decrease when compared to controls. No intervention effect was found for units of alcohol consumed per week or for CAGE scores. Sixty-three percent of intervention participants agreed that the feedback providedwas useful. Those intervention participants who were above the CAGE cut off were more likely to report that the website would make them think more about the amount they drank. Conclusions: Delivering an electronic personalised feedback intervention to students via the World Wide Web is a feasible and potentially effective method of reducing student alcohol intake. Further research is needed to replicate this outcome, evaluate maintenance of any changes, and investigate the process of interaction with web-based interventions. Further details

Bewick, B. M., Gill, J., Mulhern, B., BARKHAM, M., & Hill, A. J. (2008). Using electronic surveying to assess psychological distress within the UK university student population: a multi-site pilot investigation. E-Journal of Applied Psychology, 4, 1-5. This paper describes the level of psychological distress within university students participating in an evaluation of a web-based intervention for alcohol misuse. Data was collected from 1129 student from four UK universities. Psychological distress was assessed using an online version of the CORE-10. Results showed that 29% of students reported clinical levels of psychological distress. Eight percent of students had moderate-to-severe or severe levels of distress. The items tapping depression and anxiety suggest that, when compared to depression scores, levels of anxiety are heightened. These findings are discussed in light of the evidence which suggests that traditional modes of support delivery may not be sufficient for all students. The possibility that web-based therapeutic interventions could be utilized within this highly computer literate population is explored. Further details

Biggerstaff, D., & THOMPSON, A. (2008). Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (APA): A Qualitative Methodology of Choice in Healthcare Research. Qualitative Research in Psychology, 5, 173-183. This paper focuses on the teaching of the qualitative method, Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA), to healthcare professionals (HCPs). It introduces briefly the philosophical background of IPA and how it has been used within healthcare research, and then discusses the teaching of IPA to HCPs within received educational theory. Lastly, the paper describes how IPA has been taught to students/trainees in some specific healthcare professions (clinical psychology, medicine, nursing and related disciplines). In doing this, the paper demonstrates the essential simplicity, paradoxical complexity, and methodological rigour that IPA can offer as a research tool in understanding healthcare and illness from the patient or service user perspective. Further details

Bradley, R., SLADE, P., & Leviston, A. (2008). Low rates of PTSD in men attending childbirth: preliminary study. British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 47, 295-302. Objectives: To investigate whether men experience symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after attending their partner's labour and delivery and the prevalence and predictors of symptoms of PTSD, anxiety, and depression. Design: This quantitative study involved a large sample, within-participants design with questionnaires completed at recruitment and six weeks follow-up. Methods: Within 72 hours of attending their partner giving birth, 199 men provided demographic details and completed questions about their partner's pregnancy, labour and delivery. Six weeks later they completed a second questionnaire booklet containing measures of symptoms of post-traumatic stress, anxiety, and depression. Results: No men reported symptoms at significant levels on all three dimensions of PTSD (intrusions, avoidance, and hyperarousal) although 12% reported clinically significant symptoms on at least one dimension. The dimension with the highest frequency was hyperarousal. Linear regression indicated more PTSD symptoms were predicted by trait anxiety, fewer children, the pregnancy being unplanned, being present at actual delivery, and feeling less confident about coping, less prepared, and more distressed during the process of childbirth. Prevalence of clinically significant symptoms of depression and anxiety was 8 and 7%, respectively, and was predicted by higher trait anxiety. Conclusions: In this sample there was little evidence for the full constellation of PTSD in men attending their partner giving birth. Using a trauma perspective in this context may not be supported. Those symptoms most commonly reported could be viewed primarily as anxiety and were linked with less previous experience of attending childbirth. Attendance at actual delivery was a key predictor of symptoms. Further details

Cahill, J., BARKHAM, M., HARDY, G. E., Gilbody, S., Richards, D., Bower, P., et al. (2008). A review and critical appraisal of measures of therapist-patient interactions in mental health. Health Technology Assessment, 12(24). Background There is currently considerable practice and research activity arising from the drive to establish a secure evidence base for interventions and treatments in mental healthcare. However, this line of research has followed a main effects model; that is, one that attempts to determine main effects in mental healthcare delivery that can be labelled as specific factors influencing outcome. While such a line of research has covered important components in the delivery of effective mental healthcare, these components do not explain the activity between therapist and patient, as reflected by common factors. There has been increasing evidence of the important role played by common factors, which operate across different kinds of therapies (psychological and drug). It is therefore important to focus on the question of how to secure reliable and valid measurement of core processes. In the context of clinical governance and the increasingly central role placed on user perspectives, the quality of the interactions between therapist and patient becomes paramount. With regard to the field of therapist–patient interactions, it is essential that measures are subject to quality-control procedures. Objectives The purpose of this report has been (1) to assemble the current literature on tests and measures of therapist–patient interactions; (2) to subject this literature to critical appraisal with the aim of making recommendations for practice, training and research; and (3) to establish benchmarks for standardisation, acceptability and routine use of such measures. Further details

Castle, H., SLADE, P., Barranco-Wadlow, M., & Rogers, M. (2008). Attitudes to emotional expression, social support and postnatal adjustment in new parents. Journal Reproductive and Infant Psychology. , 26(3), 180-194. The study investigated whether perceived antenatal social support and attitudes to emotional expression are associated with postnatal distress in new parents and whether attitudes to emotional expression are themselves linked with perceptions of social support. Eighty-six women and 66 men expecting their first baby completed the DUKE-UNC Functional Social Support Questionnaire (FSSQ) and the Attitudes Towards Emotional Expression (AEE) both antenatally and postnatally. Depressive symptoms and well-being were measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Well-being Questionnaire (WBQ), respectively, in the third trimester and at 6 weeks postnatally. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) was also used to measure depressive symptoms in the postnatal period. Both mothers and fathers reporting higher perceived social support in pregnancy reported significantly lower levels of distress 6 weeks postnatally. Perceptions of emotional support for fathers and both practical and emotional social support for mothers decreased between pregnancy and the postnatal period. Parents with more positive attitudes towards emotional expression reported significantly higher social support. Attitude towards emotional expression was not associated with distress postnatally. Perceived social support may be protective for new fathers as well as mothers. Further research regarding the link between the psychological health of new fathers, and the transition of the couple to a family is needed. Further details

Clarke, Z., THOMPSON, A. R., Buchan, L., & Combes, H. (2008). Pain and Discomfort in People with Intellectual Disabilities - Parents' Experiences. British Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 36(2), 84-90. Further details

Connell, J., BARKHAM, M., & Mellor-Clark, J. (2008). The effectiveness of UK student counselling services: An analysis using the CORE system. British Journal of Guidance & Counselling, 36, 1-18. Despite concern surrounding the mental health of students, brought about by the government's policy of widening participation and increasing demands upon students, the effectiveness of student counselling has been a neglected research area. This study examines data from seven UK student counselling services using the CORE System in the routine evaluation of their services. Results indicate that counselling is effective, with 70% (service range 67% to 83%) of clients with outcome measures available showing reliable improvement on the CORE-OM from pre- to post-therapy. However, students who complete a course of counselling show significantly greater improvement, according to practitioner pre- and post-therapy severity ratings of depression and anxiety, than those clients who drop out or have an unplanned therapy ending (effect size 1.03, 0.85, respectively). The stage at which students drop out of therapy is important, with those students dropping out of therapy before the third session being the most vulnerable. The implications of these findings are discussed. Further details

Cooper, C. L., Hind, D., O'Cathain, A., Parry, G. D., ISAAC, C. L., Rose, A., et al. (2008). The acceptability of cognitive behavioural therapy software for the treatment of depression in people with multiple sclerosis. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 62 (Suppl. 1), A12-13.

Corcoran, R., ROWSE, G., Moore, R., Blackwood, N., Kinderman, P., Howard, R., et al. (2008). A transdiagnostic investigation of theory of mind and jumping to conclusions in patients with persecutory delusions. Psychological Medicine, 38(11), 1577 - 1583. BACKGROUND: A tendency to make hasty decisions on probabilistic reasoning tasks and a difficulty attributing mental states to others are key cognitive features of persecutory delusions (PDs) in the context of schizophrenia. This study examines whether these same psychological anomalies characterize PDs when they present in the context of psychotic depression. METHOD: Performance on measures of probabilistic reasoning and theory of mind (ToM) was examined in five subgroups differing in diagnostic category and current illness status. RESULTS: The tendency to draw hasty decisions in probabilistic settings and poor ToM tested using story format feature in PDs irrespective of diagnosis. Furthermore, performance on the ToM story task correlated with the degree of distress caused by and preoccupation with the current PDs in the currently deluded groups. By contrast, performance on the non-verbal ToM task appears to be more sensitive to diagnosis, as patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders perform worse on this task than those with depression irrespective of the presence of PDs. CONCLUSIONS: The psychological anomalies associated with PDs examined here are transdiagnostic but different measures of ToM may be more or less sensitive to indices of severity of the PDs, diagnosis and trait- or state-related cognitive effects. Further details

Davies, J., SLADE, P., Wright, I., & Stewart, P. (2008). Post traumatic Stress Symptoms Following Childbirth and Mothers' Perceptions of their Infants. Infant Mental Health Journal., 29, 537-554. Further details

EPTON, T., & HARRIS, P. R. (2008). Self-affirmation promotes health behavior change. Health Psychology, 27(6), 746-752. OBJECTIVE: Evidence shows that self-affirmation has a positive effect on message acceptance and other variables that motivate health behavior change; however, this has not been translated into actual behavioral change. We propose that particular features of the previous studies may account for this failure; the current study addresses this. It is designed to test whether a self-affirmation manipulation can increase a health-promoting behavior (fruit and vegetable consumption). It also explores the extent to which efficacy variables mediate the self-affirmation and behavior relationship. DESIGN: Women (N = 93) were randomly allocated to a self-affirmation or control task prior to reading a message regarding the health-promoting effects of fruit and vegetables. MAIN OUTCOME-MEASURES: Response-efficacy, self-efficacy, and intention measures were taken immediately after exposure to the message, followed by a 7-day diary record of fruit and vegetable consumption. RESULTS: Self-affirmed participants ate significantly more portions of fruit and vegetables, an increase of approximately 5.5 portions across the week, in comparison to the control group. This effect was mediated by response-efficacy. CONCLUSION: Self-affirmation interventions can successfully influence health-promoting behaviors. Further details

Field, E., NORMAN, P., & Barton, J. (2008). Cross-sectional and prospective associations between cognitive appraisals and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms following stroke. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 46, 62-70. Studies describing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as a result of physical illness and its treatment were reviewed. PTSD was described in studies investigating myocardial infarction (MI), cardiac surgery, haemorrhage and stroke, childbirth, miscarriage, abortion and gynaecological procedures, intensive care treatment, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, awareness under anaesthesia, and in a group of miscellaneous conditions. Cancer medicine was not included as it had been the subject of a recent review in this journal. Studies were reviewed in terms of the prevalence rates for PTSD, intrusive and avoidance symptoms, predictive and associated factors and the consequences of PTSD on healthcare utilization and outcome. There was considerable variability both in the study methodology and design and in the results. The highest prevalence rates were identified in patients treated in intensive care units (ICUs) and those with HIV infection. Irrespective of the physical illness, posttraumatic symptomatology is more common than PTSD caseness. Existing characteristics of the patient may well predispose individuals to the development of PTSD as do other factors such as poor social support and negative interactions with healthcare staff. Generally, the severity of the illness itself is not predictive of PTSD. Issues relating to sampling, attrition, diagnosis, the course of symptoms, aetiological pathways, and the consequences of the disorder are discussed. The presence of PTSD most probably influences the patient's use of healthcare resources and may affect their clinical outcome. Further details

Godin, G., SHEERAN, P., Conner, M., & Germain, M. (2008). Asking questions changes behavior: Mere measurement effects on frequency of blood donation. Health Psychology, 27, 179-184. Objective: This research examined the impact of completing a questionnaire about blood donation on subsequent donation behavior among a large sample of experienced blood donors. Design: Participants (N = 4672) were randomly assigned to an experimental condition that received a postal questionnaire measuring cognitions about donation or a control condition that did not receive a questionnaire. Main Outcome Measures: Number of registrations at blood drives and number of successful blood donations were assessed using objective records both 6 months and 12 months later. Results: Findings indicated that, compared to control participants, the mean frequency of number of registrations at blood drives among participants in the experimental group was 8.6% greater at 6 months (p < .0.007), and was 6.4% greater at 12 months (p < .035). Significant effects were also observed for successful blood donations at 6 months (p < .001) and 12 months (p < .004). Conclusion: These findings provide the first evidence that the mere measurement is relevant to promoting consequential health behaviors. Implications of the research for intervention evaluation are discussed. Further details

Gowan, J. D., COIZET, V., Devonshire, I. M., & OVERTON, P. G. (2008). D-Amphetamine depresses visual responses in the rat superior colliculus: a possible mechanism for amphetamine-induced decreases in distractibility. J. Neural Transm, 115, 377-387.

Horspool, M. J., Seivewright, N., ARMITAGE, C. J., & Mathers, N. (2008). Post-treatment outcomes of Buprenorphine detoxification in community settings: A systematic review. European Addiction Research, 14, 179-189. A systematic review was undertaken to examine studies of buprenorphine detoxification that has included post-treatment outcomes as well as more immediate aspects of progress. Studies were required to report details of buprenorphine withdrawal regime and post-treatment outcomes including abstinence rates. Only five studies met these criteria, with buprenorphine regimes lasting three days to several weeks, and with variable follow-up. Detoxification completion rates were 65% to 100%, but relatively few treatment completers were then drug free at their follow-up appointments. In subsequent prescribing more patients had returned to opioid maintenance than complied with naltrexone. Our preliminary review indicates that buprenorphine is a suitable medication for the process of opiate detoxification but that this newer treatment option has not led to higher rates of abstinence following withdrawal. Further studies are required to more substantially examine abstinence outcomes, as well as characteristics which predict success. Further details

ISAAC, C. L., Wright, I., Bhattacharyya, D., Baxter, P., & Rowe, J. (2008). Pallidal Stimulation for pantothenate kinase associated neurodegeneration dystonia. Archives of Disease in Childhood, 93, 239-240. Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration is associated with generalised dystonia and cognitive deterioration. Limited evidence suggests that pallidal deep brain stimulation improves physical functioning. This is a report of the assessment and treatment of a severely affected patient in whom pallidal deep brain stimulation improved both physical and psychosocial functioning. Implications for treatment are briefly discussed. (C) 2008 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd and Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health https://ovidsp.tx.ovid.com/spb/ovidweb.cgi?&S=HIEAFPOLKGDDABNFNCGLIBMLIBCLAA00&SELECT=S.sh%7c&R=1&Process+Action=display

Johnson, H., THOMPSON, A. R., & Downs, M. (2008). The Development and Maintenance of Post. Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in civilian adult survivors of war trauma and torture: A review. Clinical Psychology Review, 28, 36-47. This review provides a comprehensive and critical summary of the literature as to the development and maintenance of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following civilian war trauma and torture. Prevalence rates are reviewed and predictors are discussed in terms of risk factors, protective factors, and factors that maintain PTSD. Most epidemiologically sound studies found relatively low rates of PTSD. There is good evidence of a dose–response relationship between cumulative war trauma and torture and development and maintenance of PTSD. There is also some evidence that female gender and older age are risk factors in development of PTSD. Some refugee variables may exacerbate symptoms of PTSD and contribute to their maintenance. Preparedness for torture, social and family support, and religious beliefs may all be protective against PTSD following war trauma and torture. Applicability of the concept of PTSD to non-western populations and areas for much needed further study are discussed. Further details

Jones, M., Devonshire, I. M., Berwick, J., Martin, C., Redgrave, P., & Mayhew, J. (2008). Altered neurovascular coupling during information-processing states. Eur J Neurosci, 27(10), 2758-2772. Brain imaging techniques rely on changes in blood flow, volume and oxygenation to infer the loci and magnitude of changes in activity. Although progress has been made in understanding the link between stimulus-evoked neural activity and haemodynamics, the extent to which neurovascular-coupling relationships remain constant during different states of baseline cortical activity is poorly understood. Optical imaging spectroscopy, laser Doppler flowmetry and electrophysiology were used to measure haemodynamics and neural activity in the barrel cortex of anaesthetized rats. The responses to stimulation of the whisker pad were recorded during quiescence and cortical desynchronization produced by stimulation of the brainstem. Cortical desynchronization was accompanied by increases in baseline blood flow, volume and oxygenation. Haemodynamic responses to low-frequency whisker stimuli (1 Hz) were attenuated during arousal compared with that observed during quiescence. During arousal it was possible to increase stimulus-evoked haemodynamics by increasing the frequency of the stimulus. Neural responses to low-frequency stimuli were also attenuated but to a far lesser extent than the reduction in the accompanying haemodynamics. In contrast, neuronal activity evoked by high-frequency stimuli (40 Hz) was enhanced during arousal, but induced haemodynamic responses of a similar magnitude compared with that observed for the same high-frequency stimulus presented during quiescence. These data suggest that there may be differences in stimulus-evoked neural activity and accompanying haemodynamics during different information-processing states. Further details

KELLET, S., & TOTTERDELL, P. (2008). Compulsive buying: A field study of mood variability during acquisition episodes. The Cognitive Behaviour Therapist, 1, 16-26. Empirical investigations of mood variability during actual and ‘real time’ shopping episodes are absent from the compulsive-buying (CB) literature. A field experiment was therefore conducted with a participant meeting desired clinical and research requirements for identifying CB and a control subject for comparison purposes. Each participant went on four shopping trips and rated various parameters of mood and self-perception prior to, during and after each shopping trip. Each phase (i.e. pre-shop, shop and post-shop) lasted for 1.5 h, with ratings of mood and self-evaluation taken every 10 min. Results indicate that, although shopping was a guilty pleasure for the CB participant, there were more similarities than differences apparent in terms of mood and self-evaluation between the CB and control participant. The CB participant experienced significant levels of self-dislike during the shopping episodes. In terms of the comparisons between the pre-, during and post-shopping phases, the first 40 minutes of actual shopping seemed to be particularly arousing/exciting for the CB participant. The study is discussed in terms of key methodological requirements for increased validity and reliability in studying CB phenomena and the range of indicated possible cognitive and behavioural interventions. Further details

KNOWLES, R., Tai, S., Jones, S. H., Highfield, J., Morriss, R., & Bentall, R. P. (2008). Stability of self-esteem in bipolar disorder: comparisons among remitted bipolar patients, remitted unipolar patients and healthy controls. Bipolar Disorders, 9(5), 490-495. Objectives: Changes in beliefs about the self are a central feature of bipolar disorder, with grandiose self-belief common in mania and low self-esteem evident in periods of depression. We investigated whether unstable self-esteem is a characteristic of bipolar disorder in remission. Methods: We compared 18 patients with DSM-IV bipolar disorder in remission, 16 patients with unipolar disorder in remission, and 19 healthy controls. The primary measure was a diary kept for one week and completed twice each day, measuring self-esteem and positive and negative affect. We also administered Winters and Neale's (J Abnorm Psychol 1985; 94: 282-290) implicit measure of attributional style. Results: Whereas mean levels of self-esteem and affect were not abnormal in the remitted bipolar patients, the bipolar patients showed strong fluctuations in these processes. In common with the unipolar patients, they also showed a pessimistic attributional style on the Pragmatic Inference Task (PIT). Conclusions: Instability of self-esteem and affect is present in bipolar patients, even when their symptoms are in remission, and has previously been found in people at genetic risk of the disorder. It may be a marker of vulnerability to the disorder. Further details

Marriott, C., & THOMPSON, A. R. (2008). Managing threats to femininity: Personal and interpersonal experience of living with vulval pain. Psychology & Health, 22, 243-258. Women living with vulval pain can experience psychosocial difficulties. The current study explores the meaning and impact of vulval pain using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Interviews were conducted with eight women. Three overlapping super-ordinate themes emerged: (1) loss of femininity/sexual identity, (2) centrality of sex within relationships and (3) uncertainty surrounding the diagnosis. The participants here did not report the actual pain as being the central issue rather they felt the condition affected their sense of femininity, which was perceived in many ways as analogous to loss of sexual identity. Although they often avoided sexual contact, they also reported deep concern about the sexual needs of their partners and consequently often prioritised their partners, needs over their own in order to regain both their femininity and avoid anticipated rejection. The results indicate that the meaning the vulval pain had on the identity and relationships of the participants is the central concern in coping with this condition. These psychosocial factors need to be considered alongside existing medical management by health care professionals. Further details

Martijin, C., Alberts, H., SHEERAN, P., Peters, G. J. Y., Mikolajczak, Y., & de Vries, N. K. (2008). Blocked goals, persistent action: Implementation intentions engender tenacious goal striving. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 44, 1137-1143. Research on goal attainment has demonstrated that people are more likely to reach their goals when they form implementation intentions. Three experiments tested whether implementation intentions lead to tenacious goal striving following blockage of an initial attempt to reach the goal. In all three experiments some participants were instructed to form an implementation intention and other participants were not. Subsequently, the initial goal-directed attempt of all participants was unexpectedly blocked. Experiment I found that implementation intentions resulted in more attempts to realize one's goal. Experiment 2 showed that when participants formed an implementation intention their repeated attempt was acted out as intensely as their first, blocked attempt. Experiment 3 found that implementation intentions still allow people to seize an alternative, more onerous means to realize their intention. These results imply that implementation intention conserve self-regulatory strength. After goal blockage, the remaining strength can be used to continue goal-directed action. Further details

MILNE, E., & SCOPE, A. (2008). Are children with autistic spectrum disorders susceptible to contour illusions? British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 26, 91-102. Children with autism have been shown to be less susceptible to Kanisza type contour illusions than children without autism (Happé, 1996). Other authors have suggested that this finding could be explained by the fact that participants with autism were required to make a potentially ambiguous verbal response which may have masked whether or not they actually perceived the illusory contours (Ropar & Mitchell, 1999). The present study tested perception of illusory contours in children with autism using a paradigm that requires participants to make a forced choice about the dimensions of a shape defined by illusory contours. It was reasoned that accuracy of the participant on this task would indicate whether or not children with autism could perceive illusory contours. A total of 18 children with autistic spectrum disorder, 16 children with special educational needs not including autism and 20 typically developing children completed an experimental task which assessed perception of Kanisza-style rectangles defined by illusory contours. There were no significant differences between the performance of the children with autism and either of the two control groups, suggesting that perception of illusory contours is intact in autism. Further details

Moore, T. J., NORMAN, P., & HARRIS, P. (2008). An interpretative phenomenological analysis of adaptation to recurrent venous thrombosis and heritable thrombophilia: The importance of multi-causal models and perceptions of primary and secondary control. Journal of Health Psychology, 13(6), 776-784. Venous thromboembolic disease (VTE) is a serious, life-threatening condition and a major cause of mortality and morbidity. Heritable thrombophilia increases risk of recurrent VTE. The present study employed Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) to explore adaptation to recurrent VTE and heritable thrombophilia in six female patients. Three main themes were identified focusing on: (1) patients' multi-causal models of VTE and the maintenance of; (2) primary control; and (3) secondary control as facilitators of adjustment. Overall, genetic testing following recurrent VTE did not have a negative impact on patients. One area of concern, however, related to passing on the susceptibility to children. Further details

Overton, P. G. (2008). Collicular dysfunction in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Med. Hypotheses., 70, 1121-1127.

Overton, P. G., & Devonshire, I. M. (2008). Cocaine facilitates craving via an action of sensory processing. Biosci. Hypotheses., 1, 70-77.

OVERTON, P. G., Markland, F. E., Taggart, H. S., Bagshaw, G. L., & Simpson, J. (2008). Self-disgust mediates the relationship between dysfunctional cognitions and depressive symptomatology. Emotion, 8, 379-385.

Paley, M., Cahill, J., BARKHAM, M., Shapiro, D. A., Jones, J., Patrick, S., et al. (2008). The effectiveness of psychodynamic-interpersonal psychotherapy in routine clinical practice: A benchmarking comparison. Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice, 81(2), 157-175. Aims: To investigate the effectiveness of psychodynamic-interpersonal therapy (PIT) in a routine clinical practice setting. Methods: Full pre-post data were available on 62 out of a total of 67 patients aged between 19 and 60 years. Patients were seen over a 52-month period (2001-2005) receiving a course of PIT therapy (mean number of sessions = 16.9, median number of sessions = 16). The outcomes were assessed using a range of outcome measures: the 32-item version of the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (IIP-32), the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation Outcome Measure (CORE-OM), and the Beck Depression Inventory - Second Edition (BDI-II). Study data were benchmarked against comparative national and local data. Results: There were significant pre-post reductions on all measures: IIP-32 effect size (ES) = 0.56; CORE-OM ES = 0.76; BDI-II ES = 0.76. Reliable and clinically significant change was achieved by 34% of clients on the BDI-II and by 40% of clients on the CORE-OM. Clients with high pre-therapy levels of interpersonal problems had poorer outcomes. Conclusion: Benchmarking our results against both national and local comparative data showed that our results were less favourable than those obtained where PIT had been used in efficacy trials, but were comparable with reports of other therapies (including cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT)) in routine practice settings. The results show that PIT can yield acceptable clinical outcomes, comparable to CBT in a routine care setting, within the context of current limitations of the practice-based evidence paradigm. Further details

Pitts, S., & SPENCER, C. (2008). Loyalty and longevity in audience listening: investigating experiences of attendance at a chamber music festival. Music and Letters, 89, 227-238. There is currently much concern among arts organizations and their marketing departments that audiences for classical music are in decline, yet there has been little investigation so far of the experiences of long-term listeners that might yield insights into audience development and retention. This paper presents a case study of the Music in the Round chamber music festival, conducted over a three-year period that included the retirement of the host string quartet, the appointment of a new resident ensemble, and associated changes in audience attitudes and priorities. Questionnaire and interview data revealed the challenges faced by audience members in shifting their loyalty to a new ensemble and reappraising their own listening habits and stamina. The interaction between individual listening and collective membership of an audience is discussed, and the potential considered for understanding classical concert-goers as 'fans' or 'consumers'. Further details

Richards, D. A., Lovell, K., Gilbody, S., Gask, L., Torgerson, D., BARKHAM, M., et al. (2008). Collaborate care for depression: A randomized controlled trial. Psychological Medicine, 38, 279-287. Background Collaborative care is an effective intervention for depression which includes both organizational and patient-level intervention components. The effect in the UK is unknown, as is whether cluster- or patient-randomization would be the most appropriate design for a Phase III clinical trial. Method We undertook a Phase II patient-level randomized controlled trial in primary care, nested within a cluster-randomized trial. Depressed participants were randomized to ‘collaborative care’ – case manager-coordinated medication support and brief psychological treatment, enhanced specialist and GP communication – or a usual care control. The primary outcome was symptoms of depression (PHQ-9). Results We recruited 114 participants, 41 to the intervention group, 38 to the patient randomized control group and 35 to the cluster-randomized control group. For the intervention compared to the cluster control the PHQ-9 effect size was 0.63 (95% CI 0.18–1.07). There was evidence of substantial contamination between intervention and patient-randomized control participants with less difference between the intervention group and patient-randomized control group (−2.99, 95% CI −7.56 to 1.58, p=0.186) than between the intervention and cluster-randomized control group (−4.64, 95% CI −7.93 to −1.35, p=0.008). The intra-class correlation coefficient for our primary outcome was 0.06 (95% CI 0.00–0.32). Conclusions Collaborative care is a potentially powerful organizational intervention for improving depression treatment in UK primary care, the effect of which is probably partly mediated through the organizational aspects of the intervention. A large Phase III cluster-randomized trial is required to provide the most methodologically accurate test of these initial encouraging findings. Further details

Richardson, R., Richards, R., & BARKHAM, M. (2008). Self-help books for people with depression: a scoping review. Journal of Mental Health, 17, 543-552. Background: There has been little research into self-help books for people with depression, despite the apparent plethora of such titles. As an initial step, we undertook a scoping review of available books. Aim: To identify the number of self-help books for people with depression or mixed anxiety and depression that are available in the UK and to describe their principle characteristics. Methods: We located publicly available self-help books for people with depression or mixed anxiety and depression. We extracted data from the books we located that included descriptive information (including the psychological approach used), readability statistics and popularity measures. Results: We analysed data from 97 books. These publications were diverse in both structure and content. Structure and readability data illustrated that many potential readers may have difficulty using some of them. Popularity proved to be an unreliable way of locating books that would fulfil NICE guidance for a CBT based self-help programme. Conclusions: Many of the available books are complex to read in terms of literacy levels and may present additional problems given the concentration problems of people with depression. There is no relationship between popularity and a book being evidence-based or readable. Keywords: Self-help books; depression Further details

ROWE, R., Rijsdijk, F. V., Maughan, B., Hosang, G. M., & Eley, T. C. (2008). Heterogeneity in antisocial behaviours and comorbidity with depressed mood: A behavioural genetic approach. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 49(5), 526-534. Background: Antisocial behaviour is often comorbid with depressed mood but is itself a collection of heterogeneous behaviours. Using a genetically informative design, we examine heterogeneity in antisocial behaviour and overlaps between different forms of antisocial behaviour with depressed mood. Methods: Data were drawn from the G1219 large-scale community sample containing self-report questionnaire data from 941 twin pairs and 328 sibling-pairs aged 12-21 years. Results: Inter-correlations among oppositionality, physical aggression and delinquency, and between the antisocial subscales and depressed mood, were mediated by genetic and non-shared environmental influences. Genetic factors generally contributed more to the correlations than the non-shared environment. Conclusions: These results indicate that many genetic and non-shared environmental influences were common to all the traits studied, but there was also evidence for trait-specific effects. Further details

Saradijian, A., THOMPSON, A. R., & Datta, D. (2008). The experience of men using an upper limb prosthesis following amputation: Positive coping and minimizing feeling different. Disability and Rehabilitation, 30(11), 871-883. Purpose. Psychosocial factors are likely to play a crucial role in adjustment to upper limb amputation and prosthesis use, and yet have received only minimal exploration within the literature. This study therefore, sought to gain a rich understanding of the experience of living with an upper limb amputation and of using a prosthetic arm and hand. Methods. The qualitative method of Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis was used. Purposive sampling culminated in a homogenous sample of 11 males with unilateral upper limb amputations, who wore a prosthesis at least weekly. Semi-structured interviews were carried out, transcribed and analysed according to the methodology. Results. Participants identified a theme of ongoing awareness of difference in appearance and ability. Consequently, participants described themes of psychosocial and functional adjustment to minimize this sense of difference. This was facilitated by the participants' prostheses and their positive coping style. Within this, participants also identified the personal meanings of their prosthesis and highlighted the terms of its use. The minimization of their sense of difference resulted in participants regaining a sense of worth. Conclusions. The findings offer a greater psychological insight into adjustment from an upper limb amputation and the role of prostheses. These findings have implications for both the clinical rehabilitation of patients who undergo upper limb amputations, as well as for future research into the use and value of prostheses in facilitating the adjustment to this experience. Further details

Shryane, N. M., Corcoran, R., Rowse, G., Moore, R., Cummins, S., Blackwood, N., et al. (2008). Deception and False Belief in Paranoia: modelling Theory of Mind Stories. Cognitive Neuropsychiatry, 13(1), 8-32. Background. This study used Item Response Theory (IRT) to model the psychometric properties of a Theory of Mind (ToM) stories task. The study also aimed to determine whether the ability to understand states of false belief in others and the ability to understand another's intention to deceive are separable skills, and to establish which is more sensitive to the presence of paranoia. Method. A large and diverse clinical and nonclinical sample differing in levels of depression and paranoid ideation performed a ToM stories task measuring false belief and deception at first and second order. Results. A three-factor IRT model was found to best fit the data, consisting of first- and second-order deception factors and a single false-belief factor. The first-order deception and false-belief factors had good measurement properties at low trait levels, appropriate for samples with reduced ToM ability. First-order deception and false beliefs were both sensitive to paranoid ideation with IQ predicting performance on false belief items. Conclusions. Separable abilities were found to underlie performance on verbal ToM tasks. However, paranoia was associated with impaired performance on both false belief and deception understanding with clear impairment at the simplest level of mental state attribution. Further details

Shyrane, N. M., Cocoran, R., ROWSE, G., Moore, R., Cummins, S., Blackwood, N., et al. (2008). Deception and false belief in paranoia: modelling theory of mind stories. Cognitive Neuropsychiatry, 13(1), 8-32. Background. This study used Item Response Theory (IRT) to model the psychometric properties of a Theory of Mind (ToM) stories task. The study also aimed to determine whether the ability to understand states of false belief in others and the ability to understand another's intention to deceive are separable skills, and to establish which is more sensitive to the presence of paranoia. Method. A large and diverse clinical and nonclinical sample differing in levels of depression and paranoid ideation performed a ToM stories task measuring false belief and deception at first and second order. Results. A three-factor IRT model was found to best fit the data, consisting of first- and second-order deception factors and a single false-belief factor. The first-order deception and false-belief factors had good measurement properties at low trait levels, appropriate for samples with reduced ToM ability. First-order deception and false beliefs were both sensitive to paranoid ideation with IQ predicting performance on false belief items. Conclusions. Separable abilities were found to underlie performance on verbal ToM tasks. However, paranoia was associated with impaired performance on both false belief and deception understanding with clear impairment at the simplest level of mental state attribution. Further details

Smith, H., & MILNE, E. (2008). Reduced change blindness suggests enhanced attention to detail in individuals with autism. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry. Background: The phenomenon of change blindness illustrates that a limited number of items within the visual scene are attended to at any one time. It has been suggested that individuals with autism focus attention on less contextually relevant aspects of the visual scene, show superior perceptual discrimination and notice details which are often ignored by typical observers. Methods: In this study we investigated change blindness in autism by asking participants to detect continuity errors deliberately introduced into a short film. Whether the continuity errors involved central/marginal or social/non-social aspects of the visual scene was varied. Thirty adolescent participants, 15 with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) and 15 typically developing (TD) controls participated. Results: The participants with ASD detected significantly more errors than the TD participants. Both groups identified more errors involving central rather than marginal aspects of the scene, although this effect was larger in the TD participants. There was no difference in the number of social or non-social errors detected by either group of participants. Conclusion: In line with previous data suggesting an abnormally broad attentional spotlight and enhanced perceptual function in individuals with ASD, the results of this study suggest enhanced awareness of the visual scene in ASD. The results of this study could reflect superior top-down control of visual search in autism, enhanced perceptual function, or inefficient filtering of visual information in ASD. Further details

Stiles, W. B., BARKHAM, M., & Mellor-Clark, J. (2008). Responsive regulation of treatment duration in routine practice in United Kingdom primary care settings. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 76, 298-305. Replicating a previous study (M. Barkham et al., 2006), the authors examined rates of improvement in psychotherapy in United Kingdom primary care settings as a function of the number of sessions attended. Included in the study were adult clients who returned valid assessments at the beginning and the end of their treatment, had planned endings, began treatment above the clinical cutoff score, and were seen for 20 or fewer sessions (N = 9,703; 72.4% female; 87.7% Caucasian; average age = 40.9 years). Clients' average assessment scores improved substantially across treatment, with a pretreatment-posttreatment effect size of 1.96; 62.0% achieved reliable and clinically significant improvement (RCSI). Clients' mean pretreatment-posttreatment change was approximately constant regardless of treatment duration (in the range of 0 to 20 sessions); the RCSI rate decreased slightly with treatment duration, as fewer clients fell below the cutoff at longer durations. Results were interpreted as suggesting that therapists and clients tend to make appropriately responsive decisions about treatment duration. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved) Further details

Stiles, W. B., BARKHAM, M., Mellor-Clark, J., & Connell, J. (2008). Effectivesss of cognitive-behavioural, person-centered, and psychodynamic therapies in UK primary care routine practice: Replication with a larger sample. Psychological Medicine, 38, 677-688. Background Psychotherapy's equivalence paradox is that treatments tend to have equivalently positive outcomes despite non-equivalent theories and techniques. We replicated an earlier comparison of treatment approaches in a sample four times larger and restricted to primary-care mental health. Method Patients (n=5613) who received cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT), person-centred therapy (PCT) or psychodynamic therapy (PDT) at one of 32 NHS primary-care services during a 3-year period (2002–2005) completed the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation – Outcome Measure (CORE-OM) at the beginning and end of treatment. Therapists indicated which approaches were used on an End of Therapy form. We compared outcomes of groups treated with CBT (n=1045), PCT (n=1709), or PDT (n=261) only or with one of these plus one additional approach (e.g. integrative, supportive, art), designated CBT+1 (n=1035), PCT+1 (n=1033), or PDT+1 (n=530), respectively. Results All six groups began treatment with equivalent CORE-OM scores, and all averaged marked improvement (overall pre/post effect size=1.39). Neither treatment approach nor degree of purity (‘only’ v. ‘+1’) had a statistically significant effect. Distributions of change scores were all similar. Conclusions Replicating the earlier results, the theoretically different approaches tended to have equivalent outcomes. Caution is warranted because of limited treatment specification, non-random assignment, incomplete data, and other issues. Insofar as these routine treatments appear effective for patients who complete them, those who fail to complete (or to begin) treatment deserve attention by researchers and policymakers. Further details

Stiles, W. B., BARKHAM, M., Mellor-Clark, J., & Connell, J. (2008). Routine psychological treatment and the Dodo Verdict: A rejoinder to Clark et al. 2008, 38, 905-910. Further details

THOMPSON, A. R., Donnison, J., Warnock-Parkes, E., TURPIN, G., Turner, J. & Kerr, I.B. (2008). Multidisciplinary community mental health team staff's experience of a ‘skills level’ training course in cognitive analytic therapy. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 17, 131-137. his study sought to explore community mental health teams' (CMHTs) experiences of receiving an innovative introductory level training in cognitive analytic therapy (CAT). CMHTs are important providers of care for people with mental health problems. Although CMHTs have many strengths, they have been widely criticized for failing to have a shared model underlying practice. Inter-professional training which develops shared therapeutic models from which to plan care delivery is, therefore, essential. We have been developing such a training based on the psychotherapeutic principles of CAT. Twelve community mental health staff (six mental health social workers and six community psychiatric nurses) were interviewed by an independent interviewer following the completion of the training programme. The interviews were analysed using a qualitative thematic analysis. The analysis revealed that the programme increased the participants' self-assessed therapeutic confidence and skill and fostered the development of a shared model within the team, although the training was also perceived as adding to workload. The results of this study suggest that whole-team CAT training may facilitate cohesion and also suggest that having some shared common language is important in enabling and supporting work with 'difficult' and 'complex' clients, for example, those with personality disorders. Further development of such training accompanied by rigorous evaluation should be undertaken. Further details

THOMPSON, A. R., Powis, J., & Carradice, A. (2008). Community mental health nurses’ experiences of working with people who engage in deliberate self-harm: an interpretative phenomenological analysis. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 17, 151-159. his paper reports on a study that explored community psychiatric nurses' experiences of working with people who self-harm. Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis was used with eight experienced community psychiatric nurses who participated in semi-structured interviews. Established quality control procedures were utilized including audit of the analysis process and validating the results with participants. The participants described struggling to conceptualize self-harm behaviour and generally reported finding working with people who self-harm stressful particularly in terms of managing the emotional impact upon themselves and the boundaries of their professional responsibilities in relation to managing risk. The therapeutic relationship was viewed as crucial and a variety of coping methods to manage the impact of the work, which had largely developed through 'on the job', experience were described. The results highlight the potential difficulties faced by community staff and can be translated into clear recommendations for training and support. Further details

TOTTERDELL, P., Holman, D., & Hukin, A. (2008). Social networkers: Measuring and examining individual differences in propensity to connect with others. Social Networks, 30, 283-296. The research examined individual differences in people's propensity to connect with others (PCO). A measure of PCO, with components for making friends (strong ties), making acquaintances (weak ties), and joining others (bridging ties), was developed and tested in two studies involving 144 undergraduates and 197 health-care employees. PCO and its components were significantly positively associated with social network characteristics (including size, betweenness centrality, and brokerage) and indicators of personal adjustment including support received, attainment, well-being, influence, and suggestion-making. PCO had effects beyond those of major personality traits, and PCO components displayed distinctive relationships with work network characteristics. Further details

TOTTERDELL, P., & KELLET, S. (2008). Restructuring mood in cyclothymia using cognitive behavioral therapy: An intensive time-sampling study. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 64, 501-518.

TURPIN, G., Richards, D., Hope, R., & Duffy, R. (2008). Delivering the IAPT programme. Healthcare Counselling and Psychotherapy Journal, 8, 2-8. Further details

TURPIN, G., Richards, D., Hope, R., & Duffy, R. (2008). Improving access to psychological therapies: A national initiative to ensure the delivery of high quality evidence-based therapies. Papeles del Psicologo, 29, 271-280.

Walpole, P., ISAAC, C. L., & Reynders, H. (2008). A comparison of emotional and cognitive intelligences in people with and without temporal lobe epilepsy. Epilepsia, 49(8). Medial temporal lobe structures have been hypothesized to be important in emotional intelligence (EI) and social cognition. There is some evidence associating temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with impairments in social cognition. This study aimed to establish whether TLE is also associated with deficits in EI. Sixteen patients with TLE and 14 controls without epilepsy matched for age and current intelligence quotient were compared on measures of EI, recognition of facial expressions of emotion, and distress. Results indicated that patients with TLE showed both impaired EI and impaired recognition of facial expressions. They also reported greater psychological distress, which correlated negatively with EI. It is suggested that some of the psychosocial problems experienced by patients with TLE can be conceptualized as the consequences of deficits in EI, possibly resulting from epilepsy-related disruption to medial temporal lobe functioning. Further details

WEBB, T. L., & SHEERAN, P. (2008). Mechanisms of implementation intention effects: The role of intention, self-efficacy, and accessibility of plan components. British Journal of Social Psychology, 47, 373-395. Although considerable evidence suggests that forming an implementation intention increases rates of goal attainment, less research has examined the mechanisms that underlie these effects. The present research investigated the role of deliberative processes and accessibility of plan components as explanation for the relationship between implementation intentions and goal achievement. Study I used meta-analysis to quantify the effects of implementation intentions on goal intentions and self-efficacy. The results of 66 tests suggested that forming implementation intentions had negligible effects on both variables. Study 2 focused on the accessibility of plan components and found that the effect of implementation intentions on goal achievement was mediated simultaneously by the accessibility of specified situational cues and by the strength of the association forged between these cues and the intended response. These findings suggest that implementation intention effects are not explained by increased deliberation, but rather accrue from heightened accessibility of specified opportunities and strong opportunity-response links. Further details

Wilbram, M., Kellett, S., & BEAIL, N. (2008). Compulsive hoarding: A qualitative investigation of partner and carer perspectives. British Journal Of Clinical Psychology, 47, 59-73. Objective: This study explores the experiences of family members caring for a person who compulsively hoards. Design: Ten participants, all `key carers' for a hoarding family member, were interviewed using a semi-structured interview schedule designed for the purpose of the study. Methods: Transcribed interviews were analysed using interpretive phenomenological analysis. Results: Five superordinate, discrete but interconnecting themes were identified: `loss of normal family life'; `the need for understanding'; `coping with the situation'; `impact on relationships'; and `marginalization'. Carers' accommodation of hoarding behaviours and role isolation were examined in drawing connections between themes. Outlying themes suggesting factors protective of relationships and facilitating coping were also identified. Conclusion: Carers struggled to cope with both the environmental and interpersonal impacts of the hoarding. Lacking both formal and informal networks of support, carers are in need of information and treatment options for themselves and their families. Possible avenues for future clinical and theoretical research are suggested. Further details

Wilson, N., Clegg, J., & HARDY, G. (2008). What informs and shapes research in Intellectual Disabilities services. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 52, 608-612. Background Theoretical literature in the intellectual disability (ID) field identified a mismatch between professional codes of practice (which assume clients to be 'autonomous') and the reality of fostering autonomy for people with ID (who at times are completely dependent on others). This research aimed to understand how professionals bridged this disjunction and actually provided ethical services with this client group. Method Nine professionals from adult ID services who had consulted with local Ethical Advisory Groups were interviewed about their experience of addressing an ethical issue within their work. Accounts were subjected to narrative analysis. Results Professionals' narratives featured the following themes: differing sources of conflict, professional vulnerability and seeking validation around resolution, centrality of relationships, fragility of resolutions and maintaining moral integrity. Conclusions Findings revealed systemic pressure on professionals to find 'definitive' solutions to ethical dilemmas when the issues were not open to such resolution. Findings were reviewed in light of ethical literature that shows how professionals' work inevitably features close and enduring relationships with people with ID. We suggest professionals need to draw on ethical frameworks that can accommodate relational aspects of their practice. Further details

Allmark, P., Boote, J., Chambers, E., Clarke, A., McDonnell, A., THOMPSON, A., et al. (2009). Ethical issues in the use of in-depth interviews: literature review and discussion. Research Ethics Review, 5(2), 48-54. This paper reports a literature review on the topic of ethical issues in in-depth interviews. The review returned three types of article: general discussion, issues in particular studies, and studies of interview-based research ethics. Whilst many of the issues discussed in these articles are generic to research ethics, such as confidentiality, they often had particular manifestations in this type of research. For example, privacy was a significant problem as interviews sometimes probe unexpected areas. For similar reasons, it is difficult to give full information of the nature of a particular interview at the outset, hence informed consent is problematic. Where a pair is interviewed (such as carer and cared-for) there are major difficulties in maintaining confidentiality and protecting privacy. The potential for interviews to harm participants emotionally is noted in some papers, although this is often set against potential therapeutic benefit. As well as these generic issues, there are some ethical issues fairly specific to in-depth interviews. The problem of dual role is noted in many papers. It can take many forms: an interviewer might be nurse and researcher, scientist and counsellor, or reporter and evangelist. There are other specific issues such as taking sides in an interview, and protecting vulnerable groups. Little specific study of the ethics of in-depth interviews has taken place. However, that which has shows some important findings. For example, one study shows participants are not averse to discussing painful issues provided they feel the study is worthwhile. Some papers make recommendations for researchers. One such is that they should consider using a model of continuous (or process) consent rather than viewing consent as occurring once, at signature, prior to the interview. However, there is a need for further study of this area, both philosophical and empirical.

ARMITAGE, C. J. (2009). Effectiveness of experimenter-provided and self-generated implementation intentions to reduce alcohol consumption in a sample of the general population: A randomized exploratory trial. Health Psychology, 28(545-553). Objective: To test the effectiveness of implementation intentions to decrease alcohol consumption and control for possible demand characteristics by employing an active control condition and contrasting experimenter-provided with self-generated implementation intentions. Design: Two hundred forty-eight participants were randomly allocated to I of 4 conditions: questionnaire-only; questionnaire plus planning instruction; questionnaire, planning instruction plus experimenter-provided implementation intention; or questionnaire, planning instruction plus self-generated implementation intention. Main Outcome Measure: Alcohol intake. Results: There were clinically and statistically significant decreases in alcohol consumption in the 2 experimental conditions, but not in the 2 control conditions, F(3, 237) = 3.34, p < .05, eta(2)(p) = .04 There were no significant differences between experimenter-provided and self-generated implementation intentions (p = .62). Compliance moderated the effects of self-generated implementation intentions only, such that alcohol intake only significantly decreased in participants who complied with the instructions, F(l, 52) = 4.20, p < .05, eta(2)(p) = .07. However, simply choosing an experimenter-provided implementation intention was just as effective as writing it out in full, implying that implementation intentions work even with minimal information processing. Conclusion: The findings further support use of implementation intentions to protect against health risk behaviors and are congruent with laboratory research showing that implementation intentions are a case of strategic automaticity. Further details

Bayley, T. M., SLADE, P., & Lashen, H. (2009). Relationships between attachment, appraisal, coping and adjustment in men and women experiencing infertility concerns. Human Reproduction, 24(11), 2827-2837. BACKGROUND: Attachment style may influence distress and relationship satisfaction in infertile couples. Appraisal and coping have also been linked to adjustment to infertility and may be related to attachment patterns. The study examined these associations in men and women around the time of attending initial appointments at fertility clinics. METHODS: Attachment, appraisal, coping, general well-being, infertility-related stress and relationship satisfaction questionnaires were completed by 98 women and 64 men. Data were analysed by gender comparisons, correlations and path analysis. RESULTS: Attachment anxiety was associated with well-being in women via appraisal of infertility as a loss and use of self-blame and avoidance (SBA) coping. Attachment anxiety was also linked with infertility-related stress through SBA. In men, attachment anxiety was associated with well-being and infertility-related stress again via SBA coping. Attachment anxiety and avoidance were related to lower relationship satisfaction in women, whereas only the former was important for men. CONCLUSIONS: Attachment patterns link to couples' relationship satisfaction and are associated with adjustment via appraisal and coping. Identification of such patterns may assist in identifying need and tailoring cognitive interventions to individuals. Participants were mainly white and well-educated, and wider generalization cannot automatically be assumed. Further details

Bentall, R. P., ROWSE, G., Shyrane, N. M., Kinderman, P., Howard, R., Blackwood, N., et al. (2009). The cognitive and affective structure of paranoid delusions: A transdiagnostic investigation of patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and depression. Archives of General Psychiatry, 66(3), 236-247. Context Paranoid delusions are a common symptom of a range of psychotic disorders. A variety of psychological mechanisms have been implicated in their cause, including a tendency to jump to conclusions, an impairment in the ability to understand the mental states of other people (theory of mind), an abnormal anticipation of threat, and an abnormal explanatory style coupled with low self-esteem. Objective To determine the structure of the relationships among psychological mechanisms contributing to paranoia in a transdiagnostic sample. Design Cross-sectional design, with relationships between predictor variables and paranoia examined by structural equation models with latent variables. Setting Publicly funded psychiatric services in London and the North West of England. Participants One hundred seventy-three patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders, major depression, or late-onset schizophrenia-like psychosis, subdivided according to whether they were currently experiencing paranoid delusions. Sixty-four healthy control participants matched for appropriate demographic variables were included. Main Outcome Measures Assessments of theory of mind, jumping to conclusions bias, and general intellectual functioning, with measures of threat anticipation, emotion, self-esteem, and explanatory style. Results The best fitting ({chi}296 = 131.69, P = .01; comparative fit index = 0.95; Tucker-Lewis Index = 0.96; root-mean-square error of approximation = 0.04) and most parsimonious model of the data indicated that paranoid delusions are associated with a combination of pessimistic thinking style (low self-esteem, pessimistic explanatory style, and negative emotion) and impaired cognitive performance (executive functioning, tendency to jump to conclusions, and ability to reason about the mental states of others). Pessimistic thinking correlated highly with paranoia even when controlling for cognitive performance (r = 0.65, P < .001), and cognitive performance correlated with paranoia when controlling for pessimism (r = –0.34, P < .001). Conclusions Both cognitive and emotion-related processes are involved in paranoid delusions. Treatment for paranoid patients should address both types of processes. Further details

Brown, I., SHEERAN, P., & Reuber, M. (2009). Enhancing antiepileptic drug adherence: A randomized controlled trial. Epilepsy & Behavior, 16(4), 634-639. Suboptimal adherence to antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment is commonplace, and increases the risk of status epilepticus and sudden unexplained death in epilepsy. This randomized controlled trial was designed to demonstrate whether an implementation intention intervention involving the completion of a simple self-administered questionnaire linking the intention of taking medication with a particular time, place, and other activity can improve AED treatment schedule adherence. Of the 81 patients with epilepsy who were randomized, 69 completed a 1-month monitoring period with an objective measure of tablet taking (electronic registration of pill bottle openings, Medication Event Monitoring System [MEMS]). Intervention participants showed improved adherence relative to controls on all three outcomes: doses taken in total (93.4% vs. 79.1%), days on which correct dose was taken (88.7% vs. 65.3%), and doses taken on schedule (78.8% vs. 55.3%) (P < 0.01). The implementation intention intervention may be an easy-to-administer and effective means of promoting AED adherence. Further details

Brown, J., & BEAIL, N. (2009). Self harm among people with intellectual disabilities in secure service provision: A qualitative exploration. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 22, 503-519. Research into self-harm among people with intellectual disabilities has focused predominantly on high frequency internally maladaptive behaviour among people whose disability is severe or profound. Research into different forms of self-harm, such as cutting or burning the skin, found in those with mild intellectual disabilities; especially those living in secure accommodation, has largely been neglected, although there has been recognition of its impact on individuals and staff working in this field. This study aimed to address this issue through exploration of the experiences and understanding of self-harm among people with intellectual disabilities living in secure accommodation. A second aim was to explore experiences of interventions associated with this behaviour. Method and Results Semi-structured interviews were carried out with nine people who self harm, have intellectual disabilities and had been placed in secure accommodation. Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis yielded three master themes. The first related to the interpersonal context of self-harm and included sub themes relating to past experiences of abuse and loss, and current issues of control and protection. The second master theme related to the emotional experience of self-harm, which varied throughout the process of self-harm and was characterized by anger, frustration, hopelessness, relief, guilt and regret. The third master theme related to the management of self-harm. Participants had experience of helpful individual and collaborative strategies, as well as interventions that were experienced as controlling, unhelpful or ridiculing. Conclusion Emerging themes are considered in relation to the wider-self-harm literature. Further details

Bugg, A., TURPIN, G., Mason, S., & Scholes, C. (2009). A randomised controlled trial of the effectivness of writing as a self-help intervention for traumatic injury patients at risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder. Behavior Research and Therapy, 47, 6-12. The study investigated the effects of writing and self-help information on severity of psychological symptoms in traumatic injury patients at risk for developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Patients attending Accident and Emergency (A & E), were screened for Acute Stress Disorder and randomised to an information control group (n=36) or a writing and information group (n=31). Participants in both groups received an information booklet one-month post-injury. Participants in the writing group also wrote about emotional aspects of their trauma during three 20-min sessions, five to six weeks post-injury. Psychological assessments were completed within one month and at three and six months post-injury. There were significant improvements on measures of anxiety, depression and PTSD over time. Differences between groups on these measures were not statistically significant. However, subjective ratings of the usefulness of writing were high. In conclusion, the results do not currently support the use of writing as a targeted early intervention technique for traumatic injury patients at risk of developing PTSD. Further details

CHAPMAN, J., ARMITAGE, C. J., & NORMAN, P. (2009). Comparing implementation intention interventions in relation to young adults' intake of fruit and vegetables. Psychology and Health, 24, 317-332. This study tests whether the effectiveness of implementation intention-based interventions to increase fruit and vegetable intake in a young adult population can be enhanced using additional pre-intervention instructions and alternative formats; namely, an 'if-then' implementation intention versus a more general, 'global' plan that does not explicitly link a situational cue with a goal-directed response. Participants (N = 557) completed pre-test measures of planning, motivation and behaviour with respect to increasing their fruit and vegetable intake before being randomised to a 3 (intervention format: control vs. 'if-then' vs. 'global' implementation intentions) times 2 (pre-intervention instruction vs. no pre-intervention instruction) between-participants design. Results revealed a significant intervention format by time interaction, such that intake significantly increased by 0.50 portions in the if-then format condition compared with 0.31 in the global format and 0.01 in the control condition. These results suggest that 'if-then' manipulations are superior in promoting behaviour change in an applied setting. The use of pre-intervention instructions had no additional effect on behaviour, providing evidence for the efficacy of implementation intentions even when experimenter demand is reduced. Evidence is also presented to suggest that reported increases in intake are not related to demand characteristics. Further details

Cochrane, T., Davey, R. C., Gidlow, C., Smith, G. R., Fairburn, J., ARMITAGE, C. J., et al. (2009). Small area and individual level predictors of physical activity in urban communities: A multi-level study in Stoke on Trent, England. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 6, 654-677. Reducing population physical inactivity has been declared a global public health priority. We report a detailed multi-level analysis of small area indices and individual factors as correlates of physical activity in deprived urban areas. Multi-level regression analysis was used to investigate environmental and individual correlates of physical activity. Nine individual factors were retained in the overall model, two related to individual intentions or beliefs, three to access to shops, work or fast food outlets and two to weather; age and gender being the other two. Four area level indices related to: traffic, road casualties, criminal damage and access to green space were important in explaining variation in physical activity. Further details

COIZET, V., Graham, J. H., Moss, J., Bolam, J. P., Savasta, M., McHaffie, J. G., et al. (2009). Short-latency visual input to the subthalamic nucleus is provided by the midbrain superior colliculus. Journal of Neuroscience, 29, 5701-5709.

Davies, C., KELLET, S., & BEAIL, N. (2009). Utility of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 114, 172-178. The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) continues to be used to purportedly measure self-esteem of people with intellectual disabilities, despite the lack of sound evidence concerning its validity and reliability when employed with this population. The psychometric foundations of the RSES were analyzed here with a sample of 219 participants with intellectual disabilities. The factor analytic methods employed revealed two factors (Self-Worth and Self-Criticism) and more specific problems with RSES Items 5 and 8. Overall, this scale showed only moderate temporal and moderate internal reliability and poor aspects of criterion validity. Results are discussed with reference to either developing a new measure of self-esteem or redesigning and simplifying the RSES in order to increase its initial face validity in intellectual disability samples. Further details

Dommett, E. J., OVERTON, P. G., & Greenfield, S. A. (2009). Drug therapies for attentional disorders alter the signal-to-noise ratio in the superior colliculus. Neuro-science, 164, 1369-1376.

Donnison, J., THOMPSON, A. R., & Turpin, G. (2009). A qualitative study of the conceptual models employed by community mental health team staff. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 18, 310-317. Further details

Durkin, K., & BLADES, M. (2009). Young people and the mass media. . British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 27, 1-12.

Durkin, K., BLADES, M., & (Eds). (2009). Special Issue on Children and Media. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 27, 1-245.

Elliot, M. A., & ARMITAGE, C. J. (2009). Promoting drivers' compliance with speed limits: Testing an intervention based on the theory of planned behaviour. British Journal of Psychology, 100, 111-132. The efficacy of a theory of planned behaviour (TPB)-based intervention to promote drivers' compliance with speed limits was tested. Participants (N=300) were randomly assigned to an experimental condition, and received persuasive messages designed to change beliefs as specified in the TPB, or a control condition. Baseline and follow-up (1 month post-baseline) measures of TPB variables and behaviour were collected using postal questionnaires. Results showed that the intervention had a significant effect on one control belief, and significantly increased perceived behavioural control and reported behaviour. Mediation analyses confirmed that the control belief change generated the perceived behavioural control change and that the perceived behavioural control change generated the behaviour change. Implications for promoting road safety are discussed. Further details

Escott, D., SLADE, P., & Spilby, H. (2009). Preparation for pain management during childbirth:The psychological aspects of coping strategy development in antenatal education Clinical Psychology Review 7, 617-622. Further details

Evans, D., & NORMAN, P. (2009). Illness representations, coping and psychological adjustment to Parkinson's Disease. Psychology & Health, 24, 1181-1196. The present study reports an application of the common sense model (CSM) of illness representations to the prediction of psychological distress in people with Parkinson's disease (PD). The study sought to (i) examine cross-sectional and prospective associations between illness representations, coping and psychological distress, and (ii) test the hypothesis that coping would mediate any relationships between illness representations and psychological distress. Patients with PD (n = 58) completed the Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised, the Medical Coping Modes Questionnaire and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Patients (n = 57) were followed-up at 6 months. Illness representations explained large amounts of variance in time 1 anxiety (R2 = 0.42) and depression (R2 = 0.44) as well as additional variance in time 2 anxiety (ΔR2 = 0.12) and depression (ΔR2 = 0.09) after controlling for baseline scores. In addition, avoidance mediated the effect of emotional representations on time 1 anxiety, and acceptance-resignation mediated the effects of both consequences and emotional representations on time 1 depression. The present study therefore provides partial support for the mediational model outlined in the CSM, as significant mediation effects were found only in the cross-sectional analyses. Further details

Gangstad, B., NORMAN, P., & Barton, J. (2009). Cognitive processing and posttraumatic growth following stroke. Rehabilitation Psychology, 54, 69-75. Objective: To examine whether posttraumatic growth (PTG) after stroke is associated with cognitive processing and psychological distress and whether time since stroke moderates relationships between these variables. Method: A sample of stroke survivors (N = 60) completed the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory, the Cognitive Processing of Trauma Scale and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Results: PTG correlated positively with four indicators of cognitive processing (i.e., positive cognitive restructuring, downward comparison, resolution, and denial) and negatively with depression. Time since stroke moderated a number of these relationships. As length of time since stroke increased, the relationships between PTG and anxiety and depression became more negative and significant, and the relationships between PTG and downward comparisons and resolution became more positive and significant. Discussion: The findings indicate the possibility of PTG after stroke and suggest that cognitive processing is an important process for engendering such growth. Further details

Gollwitzer, P. M., & SHEERAN, P. (2009). Self-regulation of consumer decision making and behavior: The role of implementation intentions. Journal of Consumer Psychology, 19, 593-607. In the present paper, we argue that people can use the self-regulatory strategy of forming implementation intentions (i.e., if-then plans) to make better consumer decisions and facilitate the translation of those decisions into action. First, research on the mechanisms and effects of implementation intentions is reviewed. Second, we discuss how implementation intentions can be used to improve consumer decision making by promoting attention control and information elaboration, and overcoming disruptive influences. Third, we consider the various problems that militate against the enactment of one’s decisions, and evidence is presented to show that implementation intentions are still effective even when goal attainment does not seem to be amenable to self-regulation. Finally, potential moderators of implementation intention effects are discussed. Further details

Gollwitzer, P. M., SHEERAN, P., Michalski, V., & Seifert, A. E. (2009). When intentions go public: Does social reality widen the intention-behavior gap? . Psychological Science, 20, 612-618. Based on Lewinian goal theory in general and self-completion theory in particular, four experiments examined the implications of other people taking notice of one's identity-related behavioral intentions (e.g., the intention to read law periodicals regularly to reach the identity goal of becoming a lawyer). Identity-related behavioral intentions that had been noticed by other people were translated into action less intensively than those that had been ignored (Studies 1-3). This effect was evident in the field (persistent striving over 1 week's time; Study 1) and in the laboratory (jumping on opportunities to act; Studies 2 and 3), and it held among participants with strong but not weak commitment to the identity goal (Study 3). Study 4 showed, in addition, that when other people take notice of an individual's identity-related behavioral intention, this gives the individual a premature sense of possessing the aspired-to identity. Further details

Hall, K. E., ISAAC, C., & HARRIS, P. (2009). Memory complaints in epilepsy: an accurate reflection of memory impairment or an indicator of poor adjustment? A Review of the Literature. Clinical Psychology Review, 29, 354-367. Further details

Hall, K. E., ISAAC, C. L., & HARRIS, P. R. (2009). Memory complaints in epilepsy: an accurate reflection of memory impairment or an indicator of poor adjustment? A Review of the Literature. Clinical Psychology Review, 354-367. Further details

HARRIS, P., & EPTON, T. (2009). The impact of self-affirmation on health cognition, health behaviour and other health-related responses: A narrative review. Social and Personality Psychology Compass, 3, 962-978. Further details

HARRIS, P., Sillence, E., & Briggs, P. (2009). The effect of credibility-related design cues on responses to a web-based message about the breast cancer risks from alcohol. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 11(e37). Further details

Haywood, A., SLADE, P., & King, H. (2009). A qualitative investigation of women's experiences of the self and others in relation to their menstrual cycle. British Journal Health Psychology., 14, 127-141. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to compare and contrast detailed accounts of a community sample of women, with prospectively defined low or high premenstrual symptoms, highlighting differences/similarities. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 16 women (9 with 'low' and 7 with 'high' symptom levels) and analysed using template analysis. RESULTS: 'Low symptom' women perceived themselves as generally laid back but demonstrated a need for organization and control in the family environment. They accepted less than perfect relationships, compared themselves favourably to others and perceived themselves as having strong support networks. There was a negative perception of the introduction to menarche but this was coupled with strong maternal support. 'High symptom' women showed patterns of perfectionism, an emphasis on self-sacrifice and unfavourable comparison of self with others. They reported feeling alone, overwhelmed by tasks and experienced relationships as characterized by unresolved tensions. Menarche was viewed as a positive experience but accompanied by low maternal support. Both groups viewed their symptoms as irrational and controllable outside the home, but vented on partner, close family and children. There was acknowledgement of difference from 'normal' ('low') with an emphasis on the all-encompassing nature of symptoms ('high'). CONCLUSIONS: Women with high and low menstrual cycle symptoms viewed aspects of themselves and their relationships with others in both similar and different ways. A major issue for high symptom women was that they struggled to tolerate imperfections, both in their own performance or in their relationships with others, potentially emphasizing the role of cognitive appraisals in interventions. Further details

Hughes, J., Naqvi, H., Saul, K., et_al_including, Thompson, A. R., & as_part_of_Appearance_Research_Consortium. (2009). South Asian Community views about indviduals with a disfigurement. Diversity in Health & Care, 6(4), 241-253. Further details

Johnson, H., THOMPSON, A. R., & Downs, M. (2009). Non-western interpreters' experiences of trauma: Culturally protective factors following exposure to extreme stress. Ethnicity & Health, 14(4), 407-418. Further details

KELLETT, S., BEAIL, N., Bush, A., Dyson, G., & Wilbram, M. (2009). Single case experimental evaluations of psychodynamic and cognitive-behavioural psychotherapy: examples of methods and outcomes. advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities., 3(4), 36-44. Single case experimental design (SCED) is a well established tradition in evaluating the effectiveness of behavioural interventions for people with learning difficulties and behavioural problems. However, the use of SCED is severely hampered once the focus is shifted to other psychological modalities such as psychodynamic psychotherapy, or differing presenting problems such as interpersonal problems. This paper examines the application of single case experimental design methodologies in the evaluation of treatment for three particular clients. Case one describes the psychodynamic psychotherapy of hypochondriasis in an A/B design. Case two describes the psychodynamic psychotherapy of ambulophobia in an A/B design. Case three describes a cognitive-behavioural therapy of anger and aggression in a shifting criterion design. Statistical analysis of the data shows the hypochondriasis and anger cases responded to treatment, whereas the ambulophobia case shows a degree of deterioration during the intervention. Discussing each case in turn, the strengths and weaknesses of the methodologies are explained, and the relative merits of SCED in accruing evidence in the evaluation of the plethora of psychological modalities are now being made available to clients with learning disabilities. www.scie-socialcareonline.org.uk/profile.asp?guid=fe170d75-95c2-4232-a673-e7b17490f3e7

Klein, W. M. P., & HARRIS, P. R. (2009). Self-affirmation enhances attentional bias toward threatening components of a persuasive message. Psychological Science, 12, 1463-1467. Further details

Knowles, R., & Tarrier, N. (2009). The intensive care unit diary and posttraumatic stress disorder. Critical Care Medicine, 37(6), 2145-2146. Further details

KNOWLES, R., & Tarrier, N. (2009). Evaluation of the effect of prospective patient diaries on emotional well-being in intensive care unit survivors: A randomized controlled trial. Critical Care Medicine, 37(1), 184-191. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of a prospective diary intervention on levels of anxiety and depression in a group of intensive care unit survivors. DESIGN: Pragmatic randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Adult intensive care unit, medical/surgical wards of a district general hospital and community bases. PATIENTS: A total of 36 patients who were admitted to the intensive care unit between March 2006 and March 2007 for a minimum of 48 hrs. INTERVENTIONS: Prospective diary kept by nursing staff for the duration of the patient's stay on intensive care unit, containing daily information about their physical condition, procedures and treatments, events occurring on the unit, and significant events from outside the unit. MEASUREMENT AND MAIN RESULTS: At initial assessment, almost half of patients fell into the "disorder likely" category on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (44% for anxiety and 47.2% for depression). Paired-samples Student's t tests to compare the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores at time 1 and time 2 in the two participant groups revealed that the experimental group displayed statistically significant decreases in both anxiety (t (1,17) = 2.65, p < 0.05) and depression (t (1,17) = 3.33, p < 0.005) scores, while the control group did not, a difference attributed to the diary intervention. CONCLUSIONS: Survivors of critical illnesses are likely to experience clinically significant symptoms of anxiety and depression following their discharge from hospital. The prospective diary intervention designed to help patients understand what happened to them in intensive care and it has a significant positive impact on anxiety and depression scores almost 2 months after patients' discharge from intensive care unit. Attempts to replicate these results using larger samples are therefore encouraged, with the aim of informing best practice guidelines. Further details

MARTIN, J., SHEERAN, P., Wright, A., & Dibble, T. (2009). Implementation intention formation reduces consultations for emergency contraception and pregnancy testing among teenage women. Health Psychology, 28, 762-769. Objective: This study examined the impact of implementation intention formation in reducing consultations for emergency contraception and pregnancy testing in young women. Design: Teenage girls (N = 261) visiting a family planning clinic were randomly assigned to implementation intention versus control conditions and completed questionnaires at recruitment. Main Outcome Measures: Objective measures of consultation outcomes were obtained from clinic records at baseline and 9-month follow-up (n = 200). Results: Forming implementation intentions significantly reduced consultations for emergency contraception and pregnancy testing at follow-up compared with the control group (38% vs. 55%). There were also differences between the groups in consultation outcomes over time. For instance, whereas 31% of implementation intention participants changed from consulting for emergency contraception and pregnancy testing at baseline to consulting for contraceptive supplies only at follow-up, only 16% of control participants did so. Conclusion: These results suggest that implementation intention formation is a simple yet effective means of promoting pregnancy prevention among teenagers Further details

Martindale, S. J., Chambers, E., & THOMPSON, A. (2009). Clinical psychology service uers' experiences of confidentiality and informed consent: A qualitative analysis. Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice, 82, 355-368. Objectives: To explore and describe the experience of clinical psychology service users in relation to the processes associated with confidentiality and the generation of informed consent in individual therapy. Design: A qualitative interview-based study employing interpretative phenomenological analysis was conducted with service users. User researchers were active collaborators in the study. Methods: A focus group of four users was convened to explore issues related to confidentiality and consent, which then informed the development of the semi-structured interview schedule. Twelve users of community mental health clinical psychology services were interviewed by user researchers. A user researcher and a clinical psychologist undertook joint analysis of the data. A second clinical psychologist facilitated reflexivity and wider consideration of validity issues. Results: Four main themes were identified from the data: being referred; the participant's feelings, mental health difficulties, and their impact; relationships with workers and carers; and autonomy. Conclusions: The meaningfulness of processes of discussing confidentiality, and generating informed consent, can be improved by psychologists placing a greater emphasis on choice, control, autonomy, individual preferences, and actively involving the user in dialogue on repeated occasions. Further details

Martínez-Iñigo, D., TOTTERDELL, P., Alcover, D. M., & Holman, D. (2009). The source of display rules and their effects on primary health care professionals’ well-being. Spanish Journal of Psychology, 12, 618-631. Employees' perceptions of the emotional requirements of their work role are considered a necessary antecedent of emotion work. The impact of these requirements on the emotions employees display, their well-being, and their clients' satisfaction has been explored in previous research. Emotional requirements have been characterized as organizationally-based expectations (e.g., Brotheridge & Lee, 2003), formal and informal organizational rules (e.g., Cropanzano, Weiss & Elias, 2004), occupational norms (e.g., Rafaeli & Sutton, 1987; Smith & Kleinman, 1989) and job-based demands (Brotheridge & Lee, 2002). Although all these definitions assume some kind of shared source for perceptions of emotional requirements, it remains unclear to what extent these different sources contribute and to what extent the requirements are shared by different units, teams and individuals in the organization. The present study analyses the perception of emotional requirements from a survey of ninety-seven Primary Health Care teams composed of general practitioners, nurses and administrative staff (N = 1057). The relative contribution of different sources of variance (team, organizational, and occupational) to perceived emotional requirements and the effects on employees' job satisfaction and well being are examined. Results confirm the relevance of the source and show the contribution of emotional demands to prediction of emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction levels.

Mason, S., Farrow, T., Fawbert, D., Smith, R., Bath, P., Hunter, M., et al. (2009). The development of a clinically useful tool for predicting the development of psychological disorder following injury. British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 48, 31-45. OBJECTIVES: To identify factors significantly associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety, and depression at 3 months post-injury; to develop a generic model to predict the occurrence of PTSD, anxiety, and depression at 3 months post-injury; and to validate this model in a test data set of patients. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. METHODS: Participants were 823 patients attending an emergency department (ED) following accidental injury. Baseline questionnaires were completed, with 1 and 3 months postal follow-ups. Predictor variables demonstrating significant associations with two of the three outcome measures (3-month HAD anxiety and depression scores and PTSD symptoms) were included in multivariate regression models for each outcome. Non-significant predictor variables were removed until all remaining independent variables made the most significant contribution to each of the three models. Models were validated using a test dataset. RESULTS: Previous history of mental health problems, neuroticism score and having PTSD symptoms at 1 month predicted adverse outcomes at 3 months. When used on the test datasets, the areas under the receiver operating curve (ROC) curve for the models predicting outcomes at 3 months were: PTSD=0.91 (sensitivity=88.5%); anxiety=0.87 (sensitivity=93.7%); and depression=0.87 (sensitivity=96.7%). CONCLUSIONS: The final model performed moderately well across the three outcomes and may be useful clinically as a generic rule-out tool to identify those who will not require follow up, watchful waiting or intervention. Further details

MILNE, E., SCOPE, A., PASCALIS, O., BUCKLEY, D., & Makeig, S. (2009). Independent Component Analysis Reveals Atypical Electroencephalographic Activity During Visual Perception in Individuals with Autism. Biological Psychiatry, 65, 22-30. Background: Individuals with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) experience atypical visual perception, yet the etiology of this remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the neural correlates of visual perception in individuals with and without ASD by carrying out a detailed analysis of the dynamic brain processes elicited by perception of a simple visual stimulus. Methods: We investigated perception in 20 individuals with ASD and 20 control subjects with electroencephalography (EEG). Visual evoked potentials elicited by Gabor patches of varying spatial frequency and stimulus-induced changes in α- and γ-frequency bands of independent components were compared in those with and without ASD. Results: By decomposing the EEG data into independent components, we identified several processes that contributed to the average event related potential recorded at the scalp. Differences between the ASD and control groups were found only in some of these processes. Specifically, in those components that were in or near the striate or extrastriate cortex, stimulus spatial frequency exerted a smaller effect on induced increases in α- and γ-band power, and time to peak α-band power was reduced, in the participants with ASD. Induced α-band power of components that were in or near the cingulate gyrus was increased in the participants with ASD, and the components that were in or near the parietal cortex did not differ between the two groups. Conclusions: Atypical processing is evident in individuals with ASD during perception of simple visual stimuli. The implications of these data for existing theories of atypical perception in ASD are discussed. Further details

Moondore, A., BLADES, M., Oates, C., & Blumberg, F. (2009). Young children’s ability to recognize advertisements on Web pages. . British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 27, 71-83.

Morrell, C. J., Warner, R., SLADE, P., & all, e. (2009). Psychological interventions for postnatal depression: cluster randomised trial and economic evaluation. The PoNDER trial. Health Technology Assessment 13(30), 1-153. Further details

Morrell, J., SLADE, P., & all, e. (2009). Clinical effectiveness of psychological interventions for postnatal depression. British Medical Journal 338, a3045. Further details

Napper, L., HARRIS, P., & EPTON, T. (2009). Developing and testing a self-affirmation manipulation. Self and Identity, 8, 45-62. We developed a new manipulation of self-affirmation that is simple to use, can be employed when circumstances prevent pre-screening or using essay-based methods, and has a highly equivalent control task. In the process, we addressed theoretical and empirical questions highlighted in a recent review as requiring attention. In comparison to five controls, the manipulation promoted positive changes on measures designed to test whether people are self-affirmed. It produced a similar pattern on these measures to an existing self-affirmation manipulation. The matched control also performed well. There was no evidence of mediation by mood or state self-esteem or moderation by trait self-esteem. We discuss the potential of the method and associated dependent measures in future self-affirmation research. Further details

Napper, L., HARRIS, P., & EPTON, T. (2009). Developing and testing a self-affirmation manipulation. Self and Identity, 8, 45-62. Further details

NIVEN, K., TOTTERDELL, P., & Holman, D. (2009). A classification of controlled interpersonal affect regulation strategies. Emotion, 9, 498-509. Controlled interpersonal affect regulation refers to the deliberate regulation of someone else’s affect. Building on existing research concerning this everyday process, the authors describe the development of a theoretical classification scheme that distinguishes between the types of strategy used to achieve interpersonal affect regulation. To test the theoretical classification, the authors generated a corpus of 378 distinct strategies using self-report questionnaires and diaries completed by student and working samples. Twenty participants then performed a card-sort of the strategies. Hierarchical cluster analysis was used to determine how well the theoretical classification represented spontaneous understandings of controlled interpersonal affect regulation. The final classification primarily distinguished between strategies used to improve versus those used to worsen others’ affect, and between strategies that engaged the target in a situation or affective state versus relationship-oriented strategies. The classification provides a meaningful basis for organizing existing research and making future conceptual and empirical distinctions. Further details

Rivis, A., SHEERAN, P., & ARMITAGE, C. J. (2009). Expanding the affective and normative components of the theory of planned behavior: A meta-analysis of anticipated affect and moral norms. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 39, 2985-3019. Meta-analysis was used to determine the predictive validity of anticipated affect and moral norms in the theory of planned behavior (TPB; Ajzen, 1991). Medium-to-large sample-weighted average correlations were obtained. Anticipated affect and moral norms increased the variance explained in intentions by 5% and 3%, respectively, controlling for TPB variables. Intention mediated the influence of both variables on behavior. Moderator analyses showed that younger samples and behaviors with a moral dimension were associated with stronger moral-norm/intention relations, and anticipated regret was associated with a stronger anticipated-affect/intention relation. The implications of the findings for the TPB are discussed. Further details

Rothman, A., SHEERAN, P., & Wood, W. (2009). Reflective and automatic processes in the initation and maintenance of dietary change. Annals of Behavioural Medicine, 38 (Suppl. 1). Purpose and Methods: This paper examines the social cognitive processes that regulate people's eating behavior. Specifically, we examine how eating behavior can be regulated by reflective, deliberative processes as well as automatic and habitual processes. Moreover, we consider how these processes operate when people are not only initiating a change in behavior but also maintaining the behavior over time. Results and Discussion: Decomposing action control and behavior change into a 2 (reflective, automatic) × 2 (initiation, maintenance) matrix offers a useful way of conceptualizing the various determinants of eating behavior and suggests that different intervention strategies will be needed to target particular processes during respective phases of behavior change. The matrix also helps to identify key areas of intervention development that deserve attention. Further details

ROWE, R., Horswill, M. S., Kronvall-Parkinson, M., Poulter, D. R., & McKenna, F. P. (2009). The Effect of Disguise on Novice and Expert Tennis Players’ Anticipation Ability Journal of Applied Sport Psychology, 21, 178-185. Skilled performers interpret cues in the preparatory movements of their opponents to anticipate future events in many sports. Little work has tested whether these cues can be disguised. Using a temporal occlusion paradigm, this paper examines the effect of disguise on an Australian sample of expert (16 male, 2 female, age M = 24.67, SD = 9.47 years) and novice players' (24 male, 38 female, age M = 22.26, SD = 5.24 years) anticipation of tennis ground strokes. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that expert anticipation was more accurate than novice overall (p < .001), and disguise reduced accuracy (p = .001). The disguise effect differed by expertise across occlusion points (p = .027). The experts' anticipatory advantage was removed by disguise at 40 ms before contact. Novice performance was significantly below chance for disguise shots occluded at contact. These results indicate that disguise is an important topic for research and practice. Further details

Thomas, J., Bentall, R. P., KNOWLES, R., & Tai, S. (2009). Indirect measurement of dysfunctional attitudes in bipolar affective disorder. Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice, 82(3), 261-266. OBJECTIVE: The present study uses an indirect measure to explore whether dysfunctional attitudes are characteristic of all phases of bipolar disorder. Previous studies with bipolar patients using indirect measurements have uncovered depression-like responses that were otherwise undetected. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study design was adopted to explore the presence of dysfunctional attitudes within each phase of the illness. METHOD: Manic patients, depressed bipolar patients, remitted bipolar patients, and healthy controls were compared on a sentence stem completion task designed to implicitly assess dysfunctional attitudes. RESULTS: The manic, depressed, and remitted patients all exceeded the controls on implicit measures of dysfunctional attitudes. CONCLUSIONS: The findings are consistent with the hypothesis that all phases of bipolar disorder are associated with depressogenic dysfunctional attitudes. Further details

THOMPSON, A. (2009). Managing the psychosocial impact of skin conditions: theory and the nursing role. Dermatological Nursing, 8, 43-48.

THOMPSON, A., Wilde, E., & Boon, K. (2009). The development of group cognitive behavioural therapy for the treatment of road traffic accident related posttraumatic stress disorder: A pilot study. The Cognitive Behavioural Therapist, 2(1), 32-42. Individually focused CBT for road traffic accident (RTA)-related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) involving exposure and cognitive restructuring has been shown to be effective. Group CBT interventions provide an opportunity for treatment to be delivered in a cost-effective fashion and may also be ‘normalizing’ for patients, but few evaluations have been published. Many elements of CBT lend themselves well to group presentation, although implementing exposure presents a specific problem. The development and preliminary evaluation of a group (n = 6) targeting RTA-related PTSD is described here. Pre- and post-questionnaire evaluation is accompanied by assessment of patient satisfaction. Four of the group no longer met diagnostic criteria and the remaining two showed clinically significant change in both the number and severity of symptoms. In addition symptoms of depression decreased from the severe to the mild range within the group and there were high levels of participant satisfaction reported. Further research is required to evaluate this and similar packages before group treatment can be advocated as an alternative to individual CBT for PTSD. Further details

THOMPSON, A. R., & Broom, L. (2009). Positively managing intrusive reactions to disfigurement: An interpretative phenomenological analysis of naturalistic coping. Diversity in Health & Care, 6, 171-180.

Thompson, J., Cooper, C. L., Boote, J., Ward, P., ARMITAGE, C. J., & Jones, G. L. (2009). Health researchers' attitudes towards public involvement in health research. Health Expectations, 12, 209-220. Objective: To investigate health researchers' attitudes to involving the public in research. Background: Public involvement in research is encouraged by the Department of Health in the UK. Despite this, the number of health researchers actively involving the public in research appears to be limited. There is little research specifically addressing the attitudes of health researchers towards involving the public: how they interpret the policy, what motivates and de-motivates them and what their experiences have been to date. Design: A qualitative research design, using semi-structured telephone interviews. Setting and participants: Fifteen purposively sampled UK-based University health researchers were the participants. Interviews were conducted over the telephone. Findings: The participants suggested varying constructions of public involvement in research. Arguments based on moral and political principles and consequentialist arguments for involving the public in research were offered and most participants highlighted the potential benefits of involving the public. However, feelings of apprehension expressed by some participants imply that a number of researchers may still be uncomfortable with involving the public, as it presents a different way of working. Further details

TURPIN, G. (2009). The future world of psychological therapies: implications for counseling and clinical psychologists. Counseling Psychology Review, 24, 23-33.

WEBB, T. L., SHEERAN, P., & Luszczynska, A. (2009). Planning to break unwanted habits: Habit strength moderates implementation intention effects on behavior change. British Journal of Social Psychology, 48, 507-523. Implementation intention formation promotes effective goal striving and goal attainment. However, little research has investigated whether implementation intentions promote behaviour change when people possess strong antagonistic habits. Experiment 1 developed relatively habitual responses that, after a task switch, had a detrimental impact on task performance. Forming an if-then plan reduced the negative impact of habit on performance. However, the effect of forming implementation intentions was smaller among participants who possessed strong habits as compared to participants who had weaker habits. Experiment 2 provided a field test of the role of habit strength in moderating the relationship between implementation intentions and behaviour in the context of smoking. Implementation intentions reduced smoking among participants with weak or moderate smoking habits, but not among participants with strong smoking habits. In summary, habit strength moderates the effectiveness of if-then plan formation in breaking unwanted habits. Further details

Banks, S., Allmark, P., Barnes, M., et_al_including, & THOMPSON, A. R. (2010). Interprofessional ethics: a developing field? Notes from the Ethics Social Welfare conference, Sheffield, May 2010. Ethics & Social Welfare, 4(3). Further details

Bradley, R., & SLADE, P. (2010). A review of mental health problems in new fathers. Journal of Reproductive and Infant Psychology 29, 19-42. Further details

Carek, V., NORMAN, P., & Barton, J. (2010). Cognitive appraisals and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms in informal caregivers of stroke survivors. Rehabilitation Psychology, 55, 91-96. OBJECTIVE: To examine associations between cognitive appraisals (i.e., negative appraisals about the self, negative appraisals about the world, and self-blame) and the severity of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in informal caregivers (i.e., family relatives or close associates) of stroke survivors. METHOD: A cross-sectional study was conducted in which informal caregivers (N = 51) of recent stroke survivors completed the Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale and the Posttraumatic Cognitions Inventory. RESULTS: PTSD symptom severity correlated significantly with the Posttraumatic Cognitions Inventory Self, World, and Self-Blame subscales and with time since stroke and age (negative relationship). Cognitive appraisals explained 58% of the variance in PTSD symptom severity. CONCLUSION: The associations found between negative cognitive appraisals and the severity of PTSD symptoms are consistent with current cognitive models of PTSD and the recommended use of trauma-related cognitive-behavioral therapy for individuals with PTSD. Further details

COIZET, V., DOMMETT, E. J., Klop, E. M., REDGRAVE, P., & Overton, P. G. (2010). The parabrachial nucleus is a critical link in the transmission of short latency nociceptive information to midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Neuroscience, 168, 263-272.

Godin, G., SHEERAN, P., Conner, M., Belanger-Gravel, A., Gallani, M. C. B., & Nolin, B. (2010). Social structure, social cognition and physical activity: A test of four models. British Journal of Health Psychology, 15, 79-95. Objective. This study investigated the combined influence of social structural factors (e.g. income) and cognitions in predicting changes in physical activity. Four models were tested: (a) direct effects (social structural factors influence behaviour controlling for cognitions), (b) mediation (cognitions mediate social structural influence), (c) moderation (social structural factors moderate cognition–behaviour relations), and (d) mediatedmoderation (cognitions mediate the moderating effects of social structural position). Design. Baseline and 3-month follow-up surveys. Methods. A random sample of 1,483 adults completed self-report measures of physical activity at baseline and 3-month follow-up. Measures of age, gender, education, income, material and social deprivation, intention, perceived behavioural control (PBC), and intention stability also were taken. Results. Apart from age, social structural factors exhibited very small or marginal effects on behaviour change, and only education moderated the intention–behaviour relation. In contrast, the magnitude of direct effects of the social cognition variables was comparatively large and intention stability mediated the moderating effect of education. Conclusions. Stable intentions and PBC are the key predictors of changes in physical activity. Consequently, our findings would suggest the value of focusing on cognitions rather than social structural variables when modelling the determinants of physical activity. Further details

Godin, G., SHEERAN, P., Conner, M., Delage, G., Germain, M., Belanger-Gravel, A., et al. (2010). Which survey questions change behavior? Randomized controlled trial of mere measurement interventions. . Health Psychology, 29, 636-644. Objective: Evidence indicates that receiving a questionnaire about a behavior increases the likelihood that the person will perform that behavior—a phenomenon termed the mere measurement effect. This research tested the role of (a) the type of questions, and (b) questionnaire completion in optimizing the impact of mere measurement interventions designed to retain novice blood donors. Design: Novice blood donors (N = 4391) were randomly allocated to four conditions that varied the content of a questionnaire about blood donation (behavioral intention-only, behavioral intention plus regret, implementation intention-only, implementation intention plus regret) or to a no-questionnaire control condition. Main Outcome Measures: Objective measures of registration at blood drives were obtained at 6 and 12 months postbaseline. Results: Participants in the implementation intention-only condition donated more frequently at 6 months compared to participants in each of the other conditions. At 12 months both implementation intention conditions outperformed the other conditions. Implementation intentions increased the frequency of donations over 1 year by 12%. Measuring anticipated regret did not augment the impact of interventions whereas questionnaire completion had an important impact on donation behavior. Conclusion: Questions about implementation intentions but not behavioral intentions promote retention of novice blood donors. Further details

Hall, C. R., Rodgers, W. M., Wilson, P. M., & NORMAN, P. (2010). Imagery use and self-determined motivations in a community sample of exercisers and non-exercisers. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 40, 135-152. This study examined the patterns of imagery use and motivational self-determination, and the relationships between them in regular exercisers (RE), non-exercisers who intend to exercise (NE-I), and non-exercisers who do not intend to exercise (NE-N). A survey was conducted through the random sampling of a large population. The NE-N group reported using the same amount of imagery as the other 2 groups. NE-N participants were the least and RE participants the most self-determined, with NE-I participants in between. The patterns of association among imagery and self-determination were different for the NE-N participants than the other 2 groups. It was concluded that imagery interventions that might be successful with RE and NE-I participants are unlikely to be effective with NE-N participants. Further details

HARRIS, P., & EPTON, T. (2010). The impact of self-affirmation on health-related cognition and health behaviour: Issues and prospects. . Social and Personality Psychology Compass, 4, 439-454. Further details

Holman, D. J., Axtell, C., SPRIGG, C. A., TOTTERDELL, P., & Wall, T. (2010). The mediating role of job characteristics in job redesign experiments: A serendipitous quasi-experiment. . Journal of Organizational Behavior, 31, 84-105. The aim of this paper is to examine the mediating role played by five key job characteristics in the relationship between employee participation in a job redesign intervention and employee well-being. In studies of job redesign interventions, it has been assumed that any effects of employee participation in job redesign on well-being are a result of changes in job characteristics rather than participation in change per se. It is therefore important to statistically test for mediation in job redesign intervention studies to help establish that the change in job characteristics is the mechanism through which job redesign interventions work. However, this has rarely been tested directly, either because data to allow tests of mediation have not been collected (e.g. assessments of job characteristics) or because data have been collected but mediation has not been tested using accepted procedures. This makes it unclear whether changes in job characteristics explain the effects. Results from multilevel analyses of a longitudinal 9-month long serendipitous quasi-experimental participative job redesign intervention showed that changes in job control, participation, skill utilization and feedback, but not task obstacles, were sufficient to account for the relationship between the intervention and employee well-being. http:/dx.doi.org/10.1002/job.631

KELLETT, S., Greenhalgh, R., BEAIL, N., & Ridgway, N. (2010). Compulsive Hoarding: An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, 38, 141-155. Background: This project aimed to explore the experiences of people who compulsively hoard and how they make sense of their own hoarding behaviours. Method: A total of 11 compulsive hoarders were recruited and interviewed using a simple semi-structured interview format, designed for the purposes of the study. The resulting transcribed interviews were analyzed using interpretive-phenomenological analysis. Results: Four super-ordinate discrete, but interacting, themes were found: (1) childhood factors; (2) the participants' relationship to their hoarded items; (3) cognitive and behavioural avoidance of discard; and (4) the impact of hoarding on self, others and the home environment. The themes as a whole described people entrapped in massively cluttered physical environments of their own making. Efforts at discard appeared consistently sabotaged by cognitive/behavioural avoidance, thereby creating maintaining factors of associated personal distress and environmental decline. Conclusions: The results are discussed in the context of the extant evidence concerning hoarding, the distinct contribution made by the current results and the identified methodological shortcomings of the research approach. Further details

Klein, W. M. P., Lipkus, I. M., Scholl, S. M., McQueen, A., Cerully, J. L., & HARRIS, P. (2010). Self-affirmation moderates effects of unrealistic optimism and pessimism on reactions to tailored risk feedback. . Psychology and Health, 25, 1476-8321. Further details

Lavda, A. C., & THOMPSON, A. (2010). Psychosocial impact of skin conditions: interventions for nurses. Dermatological Nursing, 9(4), 38-41.

MATTHEWS, D., & Bannard, C. (2010). Children's production of unfamiliar word sequences is predicted by positional variability and latent classes in a large sample of child directed speech. Cognitive Science. We explore whether children's willingness to produce unfamiliar sequences of words reflects their experience with similar lexical patterns. We asked children to repeat unfamiliar sequences that were identical to familiar phrases (e.g., A piece of toast) but for one word (e.g., a novel instantiation of A piece of X, like A piece of brick). We explore two predictions—motivated by findings in the statistical learning literature—that children are likely to have detected an opportunity to substitute alternative words into the final position of a four-word sequence if (a) it is difficult to predict the fourth word given the first three words and (b) the words observed in the final position are distributionally similar. Twenty-eight 2-year-olds and thirty-one 3-year-olds were significantly more likely to correctly repeat unfamiliar variants of patterns for which these properties held. The results illustrate how children's developing language is shaped by linguistic experience. Further details

MATTHEWS, D., Lieven, E., & Tomasello, M. (2010). What’s in a manner of speaking? Children’s sensitivity to partner-specific referential precedents. Developmental Psychology. This study investigated whether young children form ‘referential pacts’ (Brennan & Clark, 1996; Metzing & Brennan, 2003) such that they expect people to refer to objects with the same terms over time unless there is a good reason to switch to using a new expression. 128 children aged 3 and 5 years participated in a study where they co-operated with an experimenter (E1) to move toys around to new locations on a shelf. E1 established referential terms for all the toys in a warm up game. Then, either E1 (original partner condition) or a new experimenter, E2 (new partner condition), played a second game with the same toys. In the second game, two critical toys were referred to with their original terms and two with new terms. Children were significantly slower to pick up a toy if it was referred to with a new term than with an old term. Crucially, this difference in reaction times was significantly greater in the original partner condition. This suggests that children found it harder to process a new term when it was produced by someone who had previously referred to the same toy with a different expression. That is, children as young a 3 years of age show adult-like sensitivity to referential pacts. Further details

Nicholson, J., SLADE, P., & Fletcher, J. (2010). The Experiences of Gynaecological Nurses Involved in Termination of Pregnancy Services. Journal Advanced Nursing, 66, 2245-2256. Further details

Palayiwa, A., SHEERAN, P., & THOMPSON, A. R. (2010). "Words Will Never Hurt Me": Implementation Regulate Attention to Stigmatising Comments about Appearance. Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, 29, 575-598. Further details

Payne, N., Jones, F., & HARRIS, P. (2010). A daily diary investigation of the impact of work stress on exercise intention realisation: Can planning overcome the disruptive influence of work? Psychology and Health, 25, 111-129. Further details

Pyykkönen, P., MATTHEWS, D., & Järvikivi, J. (2010). Verb semantics affects children’s pronoun comprehension: Evidence from eye-movements. Language and Cognitive Processes. Online studies of pronoun comprehension have revealed that children tend to treat pronouns as co-referential with the subject (and first- mentioned referent) in the prior linguistic context (Song & Fisher, 2006). The current study aimed to add to our understanding of the factors that affect children’s processing of temporarily ambiguous pronouns. It investigated whether, in addition to syntactic information, verb semantics might also affect children’s pronoun comprehension. One type of semantic information that very young children might be sensitive to is that of verb transitivity (Dowty, 1991). Highly transitive verbs (e.g. hit) have prototypical agents and patients, whereas low transitivity verbs (e.g. see) have less active, causal agents and less affected patients. Such differences in verb semantics might affect children’s pronoun comprehension. We selected 30 transitive verbs from the CHILDES corpus and had them rated for transitivity by 20 undergradute psychology students (Kako, 2006). We took as stimuli the 10 verbs with the highest ratings (high-transitivity verbs: fed, pinched, phoned, cuddled, squashed, kissed, squeezed, kicked, banged, hit) and 10 with the lowest ratings (low-transitivity verbs: bumped, teased, found, loved, hated, ignored, liked, heard, lost, saw). Fifteen three-year-olds participated in a visual-world study in which they looked at a screen, presenting two characters and a location (figure 1), while listening to corresponding four-sentence stories of the following form: 1. The X [verb]ed the Y near the [location]. 2. Do you know what happened next? 3. He did something very silly. 4. He [verb]ed. The verb in the first sentence was either high or low transitive. Children’s eye movements for each 40-millisecond frame following the onset of the pronoun ‘he’ in sentence 3 were coded as looking to the subject (of sentence 1), the object or the location. The number of looks to each area was counted for six consecutive 520 milliseconds time-bands. Children were significantly more likely to look to both the subject and the object of the first sentence if the verb had been highly transitive. This effect was significant from 520 to 2600ms after pronoun onset. There was also a significant preference for looking at the subject of the verb, although this effect occurred later (between 2080 and 3120ms after pronoun onset). There were no reliable interactions between transitivity and grammatical role, indicating that the subject preference was not modified by verb transitivity. We conclude that children had stronger expectations about both referents in the high-transitivity condition. This finding accords with accounts that explain pronoun comprehension in terms of assumptions about the causes and consequences of events and the expectations these generate about how a discourse will unfold (Crinean & Garnham, 2006). Higher transitivity verbs depict events that have more powerful causes and consequences and, thus, create greater expectations, which stimulate increased looking behaviour. The fact that the effect of verb semantics arose quickly suggests that, like adults, children rapidly generate expectations about the upcoming discourse (Koornneef & Van Berkum, 2006).

REDGRAVE, P., COIZET, V., Comoli, E., McHaffie, J. G., Leriche, M., Vautrelle, N., et al. (2010). Interactions between the midbrain superior colliculus and the basal ganglia. Front. Neuroanat., 4(pii), 132.

Rise, J., SHEERAN, P., & Moan, S. (2010). The role of self-identity in the theory of planned behavior: A meta-analysis. . Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 40, 1085-1105. The present study used meta-analysis to evaluate the role of self-identity in the theory of planned behavior (TPB). Altogether, 40 independent tests (N = 11607) could be included in the review. A large, sample-weighted average correlation between self-identity and behavioral intention was observed (r+ = .47). Multiple regression analyses showed that self-identity explained an increment of 6% of the variance in intention after controlling for the TPB components, and explained an increment of 9% of the variance when past behavior and the TPB components were controlled. The influence of self-identity on behavior was largely mediated by the strength of behavioral intentions. Theoretical implications of the findings are discussed. Further details

Rivis, A., SHEERAN, P., & ARMITAGE, C. J. (2010). Explaining adolescents’ cigarette smoking: A comparison of four modes of action control and test of the role of self-regulatory mode. Psychology & Health, 25, 893-909. The present study compared how well four modes of action control (intentional, habitual, reactive and stereotype activation) explain adolescents' cigarette smoking, and examined whether individual differences in self-regulation (locomotion and assessment tendencies; Higgins, Kruglanski, & Pierro, 2003) moderate the behavioural impact of the respective modes. Findings from a prospective questionnaire survey showed that (a) willingness, prototype perceptions and past behaviour-but not intention-predicted smoking behaviour, and explained 63% of the variance, and (b) the assessment mode of self-regulation moderated the past behaviour-future behaviour relation such that past behaviour had less impact on future smoking behaviour at high levels of assessment. These findings suggest that adolescents' smoking is controlled by stereotype activation, habitual and reactive processes. Implications of the results for designing effective adolescent smoking cessation programmes are considered. Further details

Simpson, J., Hillman, R., Crawford, T., & OVERTON, P. G. (2010). Self-disgust and self-esteem both mediate the relationship between dysfunctional cognitions and depressive symptoms. Motivat. Emot, 34.

SLADE, P., & Cree, M. (2010). An action plan for perinatal care. The Psychologist, 23, 194-197.

SLADE, P., Morrell, C. J., Rigby, A., Ricci, K., Spittlehouse, J., & Brugha, T. S. (2010). A qualitative primary care study of women's experiences of identification of high depressive symptoms postnatally and the provision of support by health visitors. British Journal Of General Practice, 580, 829-836.

Stevenson, M. D., SCOPE, A., Sutcliffe, P. A., Booth, A., SLADE, P., Parry, G., et al. (2010). Group cognitive behavioural therapy for postnatal depression: a systematic review of clinical effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and value of information analyses. Health Technol Assess. , 14(44), 1-135. Further details

THOMPSON, A. R., Clark, S. A., Newell, R. J., Gawkrodger, G. J., & Appearance_Research_Consortium. (2010). Vitiligo linked to stigmatisation in British South Asian women: A qualitative study of the experiences of living with vitiligo. British Journal of Dermatology, 163(3), 481-486. Further details

Trafimow, D., Clayton, K. D., SHEERAN, P., Darwish, A. F. E., & Brown, J. (2010). How do people form behavioral intentions when others have the power to determine social consequences? Journal of General Psychology, 137, 287-309. Much literature has suggested that people who are discriminated against or are in collectivist cultures are particularly susceptible to the social consequences of society. In the present study, the authors conducted 3 experiments to test how this factor influences attitudinal versus normative control over behaviors. First, they measured males' and females' attitudes, subjective norms, and behavioral intentions with respect to a large number of behaviors. Although between-participants analyses were mostly uninformative, within-participants analyses uncovered strong evidence that behaviors are more under attitudinal control for females than for males. Similar analyses in a crosscultural experiment involving participants from the United States, the United Kingdom, China, and Mexico support the hypothesis that behaviors are more under attitudinal control for collectivists than for individualists. Finally, experimental data collected in the United States and Saudi Arabia further support this conclusion. Taken together, the findings suggest that although social consequences are both social and consequences, the latter is more important than the former. Further details

Webb, T. L., Ononaiye, M. S. P., Sheeran, P., Reidy, J., & Lavda, S. (2010). Using implementation intentions to modify the effects of social anxiety on attention and responses to evaluative situations. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 36, 612-627. The present research examines whether forming implementation intentions can help people with social anxiety to control their attention and make more realistic appraisals of their performance. In Experiment 1, socially anxious participants (relative to less anxious participants) exhibited an attentional bias toward social threat words in a Visual Dot Probe task. However, socially anxious participants who formed implementation intentions designed to control attention did not exhibit this bias. Using a spatial cuing task, Experiment 2 showed that forming implementation intentions also promoted rapid disengagement from threatening stimuli. Experiment 3 ruled out the possibility that implementation intentions were effective merely because they provided additional goal-relevant information. In Experiment 4, participants gave a speech and subsequently rated their performance. Forming implementation intentions prevented the underestimation of performance that characterizes socially anxious individuals. Together, the findings suggest that forming implementation intentions may provide an effective means of handling self-regulatory problems in social anxiety. Further details

Webb, T. L., & Sheeran, P. (2010). A viable, integrative framework for contemporary research in health psychology: Commentary on Hall and Fong’s Temporal Self-regulation Theory. Health Psychology Review, 4, 79-82. Further details

Brugha, T., Morrell, C. J., SLADE, P., & Walters, S. J. (2011). Universal prevention of depression in women postnatally. Cluster randomized trial evidence in primary care. Psychological Medicine, 41, 739-748. Further details

Dykes, K., SLADE, P., & Haywood, A. (2011). A long term follow-up of women's emotional experiences after termination of pregnancy: women's views at menopause. Journal Reproductive and Infant Psychology , 29, 93-112. Further details

Iles, J., SLADE, P., & Spilby, H. (2011). Posttraumatic stress and postnatal depression in couples after childbirth: the roles of partner support and attachment. Journal Anxiety Disorders 25, 520-530.

Lepora, N. F., Overton, P. G., & GURNEY, K. (2011). Efficient fitting of conductance-based model neurons from somatic current clamp. J. Comp . Neurosci

Martin, J., SHEERAN, P., SLADE, P., Wright, A., & Dibble, T. (2011). Durable effects of implementation intentions: reduced rates of confirmed pregnancy at 2 years. Health Psychology, 30, 368-373. Further details

MARTIN, J., SLADE, P., SHEERAN, P., Wright, A., & Dibble, T. (2011). 'If-then' planning in one-to-one behaviour change counselling is effective in promoting contraceptive adherence in teenagers. Journal of Family Planning and Reproductive Health Care, 37, 85-88. Further details

McDonald, S., SLADE, P., Spilby, H., & Iles, J. (2011). Post traumatic stress symptoms, parenting stress and mother-child relationships following childbirth and at two years postpartum. Jounral of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 32, 141-146. Further details

Books

HARRIS, P. (1986). Designing and Reporting Experiments: Milton Keynes: Open University Press.

HOCKEY, G. R. J., & Tattersall, A. J. (1990). The maintenance of vigilance during automated monitoring.: Dordrecht: Kluwer.

HOCKEY, G. R. J., & Wiethoff, M. (1990). Assessing patterns of adjustment to the demands of work.: Dordrecht: Kluwer.

Batten, M., Griffin, M. A., & Ainley, J. (1991). Teachers of two to five years' experience: Views and experiences of preservice education, professional development and teaching in schools. Canberra: Australian Government Publishing Service.

SIEGAL, M. (1991). Knowing children: Experiments in conversation and cognition. Hove, UK: Erlbaum (Essays in Developmental Psychology Series).

Griffin, M. A., & Batten, M. (1991). Equity in Schools: An Independent Perspective. Canberra: Australian Government Publishing Service.

MAY, J., Denley, I., Hill, B., & Jeffries, M. (1993). The potential and the problems of IBC.: Elsevier: Amsterdam.

Byerley, P. F., Barnard, P. J., & May, J. (1993). Computers, Communication and Usability: Design issues, research and methods for integrated services: Amsterdam: Elsevier North Holland.

Duke, D. J., Barnard, P. J., MAY, J., & Duce, D. A. (1995). Systematic Development of the Human Interfaces.: IEEE Computer Society Press.

O'Rourke, M. M., & DAVIES, J. (1996). Tough Love: From Conflict to Caring and Change: FCPU – Heathlands Mental Health NHS Trust.

Hart, P. M., Griffin, M. A., & Wearing, A. J. (1996). The QPASS Manual: Improving the Quality of Life in the Queensland Public Service. Brisbane: Queensland Public Service.

O'Rourke, M. M., & DAVIES, J. (1996). Keep Safe at Work: A Pocket Guide: FCPU - Heathlands Mental Health NHS Trust.

GURNEY, K. (1997). An Introduction to Neural Networks.: UCL Press. (Taylor & Francis group).

Smith, P. K., Cowie, H., & BLADES, M. (1998). Oxford: Blackwells.

Parker, S. K., & WALL, T. D. (1998). London: Sage.

Parker, S. K., Jackson., P. R., SPRIGG, C. A., & Whybrow, A. C. (1998).

FAWCETT, A. J., & NICOLSON, R. I. (1998). London, The Psychological Corporation.

Gray, M., Nadin, S., Todd, C., Whybrow, A., Bain, P., Glendenning, R., et al. (1998). University of Sheffield, Institute of Work Psychology.

Scott, P. J., & SPENCER, C. P. (1998). Oxford: Blackwells.

O'Rourke, M. M., Hammond, S. M., Smith, S., & DAVIES, J. (1998). Risk Assessment, Management and Audit System: Professional Manual. (RAMAS).

KENT, G., & Croucher, R. (1998). Achieving Oral Health. The Social Context of Dental Care.: Butterworth Heinemann, London.

Parker, S. K., Jackson., P. R., SPRIGG, C. A., & Whybrow, A. C. (1999). Organisational interventions to reduce the impact of poor work design.

Mullarkey, S., WALL, T. D., WARR, P. B., CLEGG, C. W., & Stride, C. (1999). Measures of Job Satisfaction, Mental Health and Well-Being: Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press.

Human Performance and the Workplace: Volume 2: Work Motivation. (1999). Melbourne: Imprint Books.

Children's understanding of biology and health. (1999). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (Cambridge Studies in Cognitive and Perceptual Development).

Eiser, C. (2000). The psychological impact of chronic illness on children's development.: David Fulton Publishers, London.

Roberts, K. P., & Roberts, K. P. (2000). Hillsdale, New Jersey: Erlbaum.

ANDRADE, J. (2001). Psychology Press: Hove.

HOCKEY, G. R. J. (2001). Human performance in the working environment.: Harmondsworth: Penguin.

FAWCETT, A. J. (2001). London, Whurr.

Kitchin, R., & BLADES, M. (2001). Hillsdale, New Jersey: Erlbaum.

ARMITAGE, C. J., & Conner, M. (2002). Buckingham, UK: Open University Press.

NICKEL, P. (2002). Bremerhaven: Wirtschaftsverlag NW.

WARR, P. B. (2002). Harmondsworth: Penguin.

Lawford, J., & C., E. (2002).

HARRIS, P. R. (2002). Milton Keynes: Open University Press.

PRESCOTT, T. J., GURNEY, K., & REDGRAVE, P. (2002). MIT Press.

The cognitive basis of science. (2002). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Smith, P. K., Cowie, H., & BLADES, M. (2003). Oxford: Blackwell.

EISER, J. R. (2003). Putting Humpty together again: Attitude organization from a connectionist perspective.: London: Psychology Press.

(2003).

(2003). London: Wiley.

ANDRADE, J., & MAY, J. (2003). Oxford, UK: BIOS.

SPRIGG, C. A., Smith, P. R., & Jackson., P. R. (2003). Psychosocial risk factors in call centres: An evaluation of work design and well-being: Sudbury, UK: HSE Books.

PASCALIS, O., & Slater, A. (2003). Nova Science Publishers, UK.

BIRDI, K., Denyer, D., Munir, K., Neely, A., & Prabhu, J. (2003). Post Porter: Where Does The UK Go From Here? Summary report from the AIM Management Research Forum: London: AIM.

NICKEL, P. H. a. n., K. Grzech-Sukalo, H. & Schü tte, M. (2004). Lengerich: Pabst Science Publishers.

(2004). Lengerich: Pabst Science Publishers.

ARMITAGE, C. J., & Christian, J. (2004). New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers.

Gunter, B., Oates, C., & BLADES, M. (2004). Oxford, Blackwell.

Eiser, C. (2004). Quality of life and body image.: Arnold.

Stafford, T., & Webb, M. (2004). Mind Hacks: Sebastopol, CA: O'Reilly Media, Inc.

Dyslexia in Context: Research, policy and practice. (2004). London, Whurr Publishers.

Eiser, C. (2004). Children with cancer: Quality of Life.: Lawrence Erlbaum Publishers, New Jersey, USA.

Leseure, M., BIRDI, K., Bauer, J., Denyer, D., & Neely, A. (2004). Adoption of Promising Practice: A systematic review of the evidence. AIM literature review for UK Department of Trade and Industry Innovation Review.: AIM Research, London Business School: London.

HOCKEY, G. R. J. (2005). Operator functional state: The prediction of breakdown in human performance.: Oxford: Oxford University Press.

NICKEL, P., & Nachreiner, F. (2005). Bremerhaven: Wirtschaftsverlag NW.

Conner, M., & NORMAN, P. (2005). Maidenhead: Open University Press.

Nachreiner, F., Schomann, C., Stapel, W., NICKEL, P., Eden, J., Grzech-Sukalo, H., et al. (2005). Bremerhaven: Wirtschaftsverlag NW.

White Matter in Cognitive Neurosciences: Advances in Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Its Applications. . (2005). Annals of the New York Academy of Science.

Stafford, T., & Gurney, K. (2006). Computational Models of Cognition.: Hove, UK: Psychology Press.

SPENCER, C. P., & BLADES, M. (2006). Cambridge University Press.

Children and their Environments: Learning, using and designing spaces. (2006). Cambridge University Press.

Edgerton, E., Romice, O., & SPENCER, C. P. (2007). Environmental Psychology: Putting Research into Practice: Cambridge Scholars Press.

Book Chapters

HOCKEY, G. R. J. (1990). Styles, skills and strategies: Cognitive variability and its implications for the role of mental models in HCI. In D.Ackermann & M.J.Tauber (Eds.), Mental Models and Human Computer Interaction: Amsterdam: Elsevier.

HARRIS, P. (1990). Shyness and embarrassment in psychological theory and ordinary language. In R. Crozier (Ed.), Shyness and Embarrassment: Perspectives from Social Psychology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Voigt, U.-B., MAY, J., Whitefield, A., & Denley, I. (1991). Enabling States Analysis - Gestaltung benutzbarer Gruppenarbeitssysteme. In Tagunugsunterlagen der Ersten Fachtagung Computergestƒtzte Gruppenarbeit: Bremen.

Vaernes, R., T., B., Warncke, M., Ursin, H., Aakvag, A., & HOCKEY, G. R. J. (1991). Workload and stress: Effects on psychobiological and psychosomatic stress reactions. In S.L.Bonting (Ed.), Advances in Space Biology and Medicine (Vol. 3, pp. 95-120): Greenwich, Ct: JAI Press.

SIEGAL, M. (1991). A clash of conversational worlds: Interpreting cognitive development through communication. In L. B. Resnick, J. M. Levine & S. D. Teasley (Eds.), Perspectives on socially shared cognition. (pp. 23-40): Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Whitefield, A., Byerley, P., Denley, I., Esgate, A., & MAY, J. (1992). Integration of services for human end-users (1): Design Principles, Enabling States Analysis and a Design Method. In P. Byerley & S. Connell (Eds.), Integrated Broadband Communications: Views from RACE? Usage Aspects: Elsevier: Amsterdam.

MAY, J., Whitefield, A., Denley, I., Voigt, U.-B., Hermann, S., & Esgate, A. (1992). Integration of services for human end-users (2): A case study of a cooperative document production system. In P. Byerley & S. Connell (Eds.), Integrated Broadband Communications: Views from RACE? Usage Aspects: Elsevier: Amsterdam.

MAY, J., Denley, I., Voigt, U.-B., Hermann, S., & Byerley, P. (1992). Designing IBC services which enable users to reach their goals. In G. C. v. d. Veer, M. Tauber, S. Bagnara & M. Antalovits (Eds.), Proc. 6th European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics: CUD: Rome.

NICOLSON, R. I., & FAWCETT, A. J. (1993). Towards the origins of dyslexia. In S. F. Wright & R. Groner (Eds.), Dyslexia and its remediation. (pp. 371-392).

MAY, J., Tweedie, L., & Barnard, P. J. (1993). Modelling User Performance in Visually Based Interactions. In J. L. Alty, D. Diaper & S. Guest (Eds.), People and Computers VIII. (pp. 95-110): CUP: Cambridge.

MAY, J., Byerley, P., Denley, I., Hill, B., Adamson, S., Patterson, P., et al. (1993). The enabling states method. In P. F. Byerley, P. J. Barnard & J. May (Eds.), Computers, Communication and Usability: Design issues, research and methods for integrated services (pp. 247-290): Elsevier: Amsterdam.

Maule, A. J., & HOCKEY, G. R. J. (1993). State, stress and time pressure. In O.Svenson & A. J. Maule (Eds.), Time Pressure and Stress in Human Judgement and Decision Making (pp. 83-102): London: Plenum.

HOCKEY, G. R. J., & Wiethoff, M. (1993). Cognitive fatigue in complex decision making. In S.L.Bonting (Ed.), Advances in Space Biology and Medicine (Vol. 3, pp. 139-150): Greenwich, Ct: JAI Press.

HOCKEY, G. R. J. (1993). Cognitive-energetical control mechanisms in the management of work demands and psychological health. In A.D.Baddeley & L.Weiskrantz (Eds.), Attention, Selection, Awareness and Control: A Tribute to Donald Broadbent (pp. 328-345): Oxford: OUP.

ANDRADE, J., & Baddeley, A. (1993). Human memory and anesthesia. In J. G. Jones (Ed.), Depth of Anesthesia (pp. 39-51): Little, Brown and Co.: Boston.

ANDRADE, J. (1993). Consciousness: Current views. In J. G. Jones (Ed.), Depth of Anesthesia (pp. 13-25): Little, Brown and Co.: Boston.

SIEGAL, M., & Peterson, C. C. (1994). Children's theory of mind and the conversational territory of cognitive development. In C. Lewis & P. Mitchell (Eds.), Children's early understanding of mind: Origins and development. (pp. 427-455): Hove, UK: Erlbaum.

Wright, M. J., & GURNEY, K. (1995). From spatiotemporal tuning to velocity analysis. In Basic and Clinical Perspectives on Vision Research Kluwer.

MAY, J., Scott, S., & Barnard, P. (1995). Structuring Displays: a psychological guide. In Tutorial Notes Series.: Geneva: European Association for Computer Graphics.

MAY, J., & Barnard, P. J. (1995). Cinematography and Interface Design. In K. Nordby, P. H. Helmersen, D. J. Gilmore & S. A. Arnesen (Eds.), Human-Computer Interaction: Interact'95. (pp. 26-31).

HOCKEY, G. R. J., & Sauer, J. (1995). Cognitive fatigue and complex decision making under prolonged isolation and confinement. In S.L.Bonting (Ed.), Advances in Space Biology and Medicine (Vol. 5, pp. 309-330): Greenwich, Ct: JAI Press.

HARRIS, P. R., & Middleton, W. (1995). Social cognition and health behaviour. In D. Messer & C. Meldrum (Eds.), Psychology for Nurses and Health Care Professionals (pp. 107-130). London: Prentice Hall.

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Last update: 10 Nov 2011